Natural health: Ingrown hairs | Irish Examiner
Q: I get ingrown hair bumps on my thighs and bikini line. It doesn't seem t...
addition to your cat's regular food. For clean white teeth and healthy gums, make sure that your cat
has access to raw bon...
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Natural health: Ingrown hairs | Irish Examiner

Q: I get ingrown hair bumps on my thighs and bikini line. It doesn't seem to make any difference if ...
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
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Transcripts - Natural health: Ingrown hairs | Irish Examiner

  • 1. Natural health: Ingrown hairs | Irish Examiner Q: I get ingrown hair bumps on my thighs and bikini line. It doesn't seem to make any difference if I shave, wax, or use creams, I always end up with ingrown hairs. This is not a big problem, since there are only about six or eight at any given time, and they don't get infected, but I would like to know if there is any way I can prevent this from happening. A: Ingrown hairs may seem like a minor annoyance, but can be particularly problematic if they do become infected, so it is a good idea to minimise the likelihood of them appearing if possible. This is not just an issue for women -- ingrown hairs are a problem that occurs with facial hair, and even on the scalp. A tip for those who shave is to shave with, rather than against, the grain. If your hair is naturally curly, then you will be more prone to ingrown hairs regardless of your hair removal method -- tweezing, waxing, shaving or depilatory creams. The telltale bump indicating a hair has become ingrown is caused by hair that curls back on itself and becomes buried underneath the skin, which is why people who have more of a curl tend to have this issue. The type of clothing you wear is another consideration, particularly during the couple of days just after hair removal. Anything synthetic seems to cause more of a problem, and tight fitting items can contribute to the likelihood of hairs becoming ingrown. There are treatments for ingrown hairs, typically these are glycolic or salicylic acid combined with moisturiser. Glycolic acid is a fruit acid that has mild exfoliating properties, commonly found in products designed for beards and bikini lines. For prevention of ingrown hairs, this treatment can be used successfully (although the strength ingrown hairs of glycolic acid will need to be at least 10%). Salicylic acid does a similar job -- mild exfoliation and prevention of oil build-up in the hair follicles and pores. When removing an ingrown hair that doesn't seem get rid of hairs to be coming free of its own accord, you need to apply a warm, moist flannel to the area, compressing it onto the skin until the hair is apparent. You may need to repeat this a few times a day. Once you can see the hair, continue with the compress treatment as it will soften both the hair and the skin, allowing the hair to rise closer to the surface. A sterile needle or fine tweezers can be used to gently raise the end of the hair above the skin's surface, but whatever you do, don't 'dig around' for the hair, as this can cause damage and increase the risk of infection. Make sure any tools you use are sterile by boiling them in water for 10 minutes or using alcohol to clean them. When the hair is free, place a warm damp cloth on the area and then treat the area with a natural antiseptic, such as tea tree, manuka, or witch hazel. This is an unusual question, but I hope you can help me. My cat has terrible breath, she is only five- years-old, what will resolve this problem? Dogs and cats alike do need to have their dental health monitored on a regular basis. It is important to establish a regular teeth cleaning and maintenance schedule with your local veterinary clinic, but you can also try dietary changes. Raw bones act as a natural toothbrush for carnivorous animals, so raw meaty bones are a good
  • 2. addition to your cat's regular food. For clean white teeth and healthy gums, make sure that your cat has access to raw bones at least four days a week. Cooked bone is not a suitable replacement for raw, since it is not digestible and can cause problems. Instead, opt for a suitably sized raw bone so that your animal can really have a good chew. Cats do well with raw chicken necks. Small whole fish are also a good choice. The first time you offer your cat a raw bone, watch carefully to make sure that she doesn't have any issues with chewing it. Cats can be particularly fussy about new foods, so your pet may need a few weeks to get used to the idea. © Irish Examiner Ltd. All rights reserved

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