Pompey’s Theatre By Akshath Kale, Ben French.
Name of the building and other names it might have been called. <ul><li>In modern times the building is simply known as ...
The purposes of the Building. <ul><li>As the name derives, the primary purpose of the building was to provide the ground...
Appearance and architectural features. <ul><li>Much of the architecture seen within the Theatre can be traced to Greek s...
Location within the forum and its relevance to the surrounding buildings. <ul><li>The theatre was located in the 11 th re...
Pictures.
Relevance to the Study of Rome. <ul><li>The design and construction of the theatre allows researchers an opportunity to g...
Interesting Information. <ul><li>The remnants of the theatre were excavated under the leadership of Benito Mussolini, It...
A modern day equivalent. <ul><li>A modern day equivalent of the Theatre of Pompey within Australia is the internal layout...
Bibliography. <ul><li>Beacham R., The Theatre in Antiquity, (1998), [ONLINE], available from the internet June 7 th : h...
of 10

Pompey’s Theatre

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Business      Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pompey’s Theatre

  • 1. Pompey’s Theatre By Akshath Kale, Ben French.
  • 2. Name of the building and other names it might have been called. <ul><li>In modern times the building is simply known as the theatre of Pompey or Pompey’s Theatre named so after it financer and patron Gnaeus Pompey. </li></ul>
  • 3. The purposes of the Building. <ul><li>As the name derives, the primary purpose of the building was to provide the grounds for staging production from both Greek and Roman mythology. </li></ul><ul><li>In addition to this the building was also used to house large gatherings, mainly of political nature. </li></ul>
  • 4. Appearance and architectural features. <ul><li>Much of the architecture seen within the Theatre can be traced to Greek styles of construction. Similarities between the Greek and Roman construction can be the large curvature of the seating arrangement and the centralized location of the stage. </li></ul>
  • 5. Location within the forum and its relevance to the surrounding buildings. <ul><li>The theatre was located in the 11 th region of Rome (XI), within the valley between Palatine and Aventine Hill. The symbols within the actual structure were mostly dedicated to Pompey and his military and political dexterity. Following his death these symbols became more prominent. </li></ul>
  • 6. Pictures.
  • 7. Relevance to the Study of Rome. <ul><li>The design and construction of the theatre allows researchers an opportunity to glimpse into the formative design of early theatres. It also gives insight into Roman Architectural techniques and what sources they drew inspiration from. </li></ul>
  • 8. Interesting Information. <ul><li>The remnants of the theatre were excavated under the leadership of Benito Mussolini, Italy’s Fascist dictator of the 1930’s and 1940’s. </li></ul><ul><li>Julius Caesar was supposedly killed in the East Portico of the Theatre on the Ides of March 44 BC. </li></ul>
  • 9. A modern day equivalent. <ul><li>A modern day equivalent of the Theatre of Pompey within Australia is the internal layout of the Sydney Opera House. </li></ul>
  • 10. Bibliography. <ul><li>Beacham R., The Theatre in Antiquity, (1998), [ONLINE], available from the internet June 7 th : http://www.pompey.cch.kcl.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Theatre of Pompey”, (2002), [ONLINE], available from the internet on June 8 th : http://www.maquettes-historiques.net/P16b.html </li></ul><ul><li>Platner S., Theatrum Pompey, (2007), [ONLINE], available from the internet on June 7 th : </li></ul><ul><li>http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/Europe/Italy/Lazio/Roma/Rome/Texts/PLATOP/Theatrum Pompei.html </li></ul>