Preventing the Spread of
Illness in Child Care or
School
Common Sicknesses in Child Care
and School
•The viruses responsible for colds or the flu cause the most
common sicknesses ...
•Any child with respiratory symptoms (cough, runny nose, or
sore throat) and fever should be excluded from their child
car...
•To reduce the risk of becoming sick with the flu, child care
providers and all the children being cared for must receive ...
Reducing Disease
Transmission
•In many child care programs, as well as public and private schools,
parents are contacted r...
Reducing Disease
Transmission
•In many child care programs, as well as public and private schools,
parents are contacted r...
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Preventing the spread of illness in child care or school

The viruses responsible for colds or the flu cause the most common sicknesses in child care facilities and schools. Even though your child has had his immunizations, he can get other infectious diseases common in children such as colds, sore throats, coughs, vomiting, and diarrhea. In fact, most children in child care and school settings have as many as 8 to 12 colds a year. Diarrheal episodes occur once or twice a year in the typical child.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Preventing the spread of illness in child care or school

  • 1. Preventing the Spread of Illness in Child Care or School
  • 2. Common Sicknesses in Child Care and School •The viruses responsible for colds or the flu cause the most common sicknesses in child care facilities and schools. Even though your child has had his immunizations, he can get other infectious diseases common in children such as colds, sore throats, coughs, vomiting, and diarrhea. In fact, most children in child care and school settings have as many as 8 to 12 colds a year. Diarrheal episodes occur once or twice a year in the typical child.
  • 3. •Any child with respiratory symptoms (cough, runny nose, or sore throat) and fever should be excluded from their child care program. The child can return after the fever has resolved (without the use of fever-reducing medicine), the child is able to participate in normal activities, and staff can care for the child without compromising their ability to care for the other children in the group Whenever children are together, there is a chance of spreading infections. This is especially true among infants and toddlers who are likely to use their hands to wipe their noses or rub their eyes and then handle toys or touch other children. These children then touch their noses and rub their eyes so the virus goes from the nose or eyes of one child by way of hands or toys to the next child who then rubs his own eyes or nose.  .
  • 4. •To reduce the risk of becoming sick with the flu, child care providers and all the children being cared for must receive all recommended immunizations, including the flu vaccine. The single best way to protect against the flu is to get vaccinated each year. This critically important approach puts the health and safety of everyone in the child care setting first. The flu vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older, including child care staff.
  • 5. Reducing Disease Transmission •In many child care programs, as well as public and private schools, parents are contacted right away when their child shows signs of even a mild illness, like a cold. In others, a child is allowed to stay at the facility as long as he doesn’t have a fever and can take part in most activities. Either way, be certain that the school or caregiver has a way to reach you at all times—make your phone numbers at home and work available, as well as your cell phone number. •In many child care facilities and schools, the staff simply cannot care for a sick child, although in others, the child is kept comfortable in a separate area so a cold, a cough, or diarrhea doesn’t spread throughout the facility. In these programs, a staff member is trained to care for ill children, often in a “get-well room” where they won’t pass the disease to others. There may also be a place to lie down while remaining within sight of a staff member if a child needs to rest. In some communities, special sick child care centers have been established for children with mild illnesses who should be kept apart from healthy children.
  • 6. Reducing Disease Transmission •In many child care programs, as well as public and private schools, parents are contacted right away when their child shows signs of even a mild illness, like a cold. In others, a child is allowed to stay at the facility as long as he doesn’t have a fever and can take part in most activities. Either way, be certain that the school or caregiver has a way to reach you at all times—make your phone numbers at home and work available, as well as your cell phone number. •In many child care facilities and schools, the staff simply cannot care for a sick child, although in others, the child is kept comfortable in a separate area so a cold, a cough, or diarrhea doesn’t spread throughout the facility. In these programs, a staff member is trained to care for ill children, often in a “get-well room” where they won’t pass the disease to others. There may also be a place to lie down while remaining within sight of a staff member if a child needs to rest. In some communities, special sick child care centers have been established for children with mild illnesses who should be kept apart from healthy children.

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