Enabling transformative learning and
developing graduate attributes in
students: enhancement of
engagement via partnership...
Conceptions of engagement –
the dominant paradigm
 Roots in the USA (Becker, 1961: Pace, 1979: Astin, 1977:
Pascarella an...
Our own evidence from students
 Early work with Len Hand then with Christine
Hardy
 Major longitudinal study over 4 year...
A wider exploration of the
literature
 Strong evidence base and critical perspective
from schools SE research
(Fredricks ...
 To meet regularly to discuss SE.
 To involve and work with students in partnership
 An early goal was to develop a con...
The nature of student engagement
Holistic and socially constructed
 Every student is an individual and different (Haggis,...
The flipside of SE
 Alienation, inertia/anomie and
disengagement
 Performativity and disciplinary power – alienating imp...
Transforming to? Becoming
what?
Seeing the world differently
 Knowledge -Intellectually developed (ways of knowing –
self...
The value of engagement after
HE
 Integrated development of the whole person
(and ‘disposition’)
 Graduateness and gradu...
Key influences on engagement
1. Student expectations and perceptions – match to the ‘personal
project’ and interest in sub...
A revised definition of SE
Student engagement is about what a student brings to
Higher Education in terms of goals, aspira...
Principles of engaging students
1. Foster student’s willingness and readiness to engage by enhancing
their self-belief
2. ...
6. Foster autonomy and creativity, and offer choice and opportunities
for growth and enriching experiences in a low risk a...
So what works? Kuh (2008)
i. First year seminars (e.g. SI and PAL)
ii. Learning communities – cross module
iii. Service le...
Engaging students in the
curriculum
 Active learning
 Assessment for learning/peer assessment
 Choice within the module...
Engaging students outside
the curriculum
 Engaging experiences which enable
student to build confidence, develop and
lear...
How to create strong engagement?
PARTNERSHIP
AIT/GMIT seminars
The Student Engagement Agenda
 Now embedded across the sector – in strategy and in
practice with a wide range of examples...
The virtues of partnership
Epitomises positive values in society
 Ethical
 Democratic
 Enables Higher Education to a ma...
The ethos of partnership
Principles of respect, repricocity and responsibility
The individual student must perceive:
 Tha...
Partnership Practices
Healey, Flint and Harrington (2014)
A typology of SaP roles e.g.
 Consultant to staff
 Co-designin...
Benefits of partnership
(Cook-Sather, Bovill and Felten, 2014)
Enhances (for both students AND
staff)
 Engagement (motiva...
A holistic approach to a degree
programme
 Combined Honours at Newcastle
 Diverse and complex
 Individuals doing unique...
Involving the students
 Student representation:
 Student-Staff Committee
 Empowerment- Student led, working groups
 Ac...
Enhancing engagement in
Combined Honours
 Peer mentoring – social integration
 PASS scheme – academic integration
Both s...
Enhancing engagement in
Combined Honours
 Building community:
 Facilities and spaces
 Social agenda – the CHS
 Joining...
Reflections on the CH strategy
 Involves at least 50 students per year –over 10%
 Wider opportunities for involvement – ...
Challenges and barriers
 Can you think of any?
AIT/GMIT seminars
Challenges and barriers
Will depend on context, who the students and staff are:
 Student lack expertise
 Everybody is to...
Trickier challenges
 The power differential – what about assessment?
 Can we create opportunities for all students (and ...
 Attempt to create and embed a partnership ethos and
culture FOR ALL STUDENTS
 Collective, group based
 Through the cur...
Partnership within modules
 Doing as much as possible in partnership,
includes co-deciding:
Shape and delivery (in part)...
Issues
 Students sign up for the module and not
necessarily partnership
 Some don’t like partnership– it actually
diseng...
Early evaluation
 Pre-disposition to partnership helps!
 The more engaged in the first place
 Identity, values and beli...
Some advice
 Start small
 Be patient
 Form alliances
 Don’t coerce or rush in – induct and nurture
 Be conscious of y...
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Enabling transformative learning and developing graduate attributes in students: enhancement of engagement via partnership approaches in and beyond the curriculum

National Seminar Series, Athlone Institute of Technology, April 28 2015 with Colin Bryson and Ruth Furlonger, Newcastle University
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Enabling transformative learning and developing graduate attributes in students: enhancement of engagement via partnership approaches in and beyond the curriculum

  • 1. Enabling transformative learning and developing graduate attributes in students: enhancement of engagement via partnership approaches in and beyond the curriculum Colin Bryson and Ruth Furlonger: Newcastle University colin.bryson@ncl.ac.uk ruth.furlonger@ncl.ac.uk
  • 2. Conceptions of engagement – the dominant paradigm  Roots in the USA (Becker, 1961: Pace, 1979: Astin, 1977: Pascarella and Terenzini, 1991, 2005)  A focus on active classroom behaviours - (National Student Survey on Engagement) – George Kuh  Student engagement is defined as students’ involvement in activities and conditions that are linked with high-quality learning. A key assumption is that learning outcomes are influenced by how an individual participates in educationally purposeful activities.  Survey used very widely - Over 200 publications http://nsse.iub.edu/index.cfm  Transfer to other settings….Coates developed NSSE into the AUSSE (and now we have SASSE and NSSE-China) AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 3. Our own evidence from students  Early work with Len Hand then with Christine Hardy  Major longitudinal study over 4 years and subsequent  And other studies on graduateness, staff perspectives, and action research Informed by a much wider perspective on the literature Understanding and Developing Student Engagement, Routledge, 2014 AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 4. A wider exploration of the literature  Strong evidence base and critical perspective from schools SE research (Fredricks et al; Gibbs & Posskitt; Harris)  Relational engagement (Solomonides, Reid and Petocz, 2012)  Ways of being a student - (Dubet, in Jary and Lebeau, 2009) -Personal project; Integration into university; Intellectual engagement with subject AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 5.  To meet regularly to discuss SE.  To involve and work with students in partnership  An early goal was to develop a concept map and set of principles that underpin the promotion of SE  To establish an annual conference drawing together leading edge work on SE - and to feed into publication through journals and books. (Next conference– Sept 2015, Nottingham)  To gain funding to support these events and activities.  To create a bank of useful resources for us to share.  To facilitate communication between us (web, email network etc) http://raise-network.ning.com/ AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 6. The nature of student engagement Holistic and socially constructed  Every student is an individual and different (Haggis, 2004)  Engagement is a concept which encompasses the perceptions, expectations and experience of being a student and the construction of being a student in HE (Bryson and Hand, 2007).  Engagement underpins learning and is the glue that binds it together – both located in being and becoming. (Fromm, 1977)  Salience of transformative learning  More than about doing and behaving! (and thus unmeasurable in a meaningful way)  SE is dynamic and fluid  SE is multidimensional, includes student’s whole lives and it is the interaction and pattern that matters AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 7. The flipside of SE  Alienation, inertia/anomie and disengagement  Performativity and disciplinary power – alienating impact of assessment (Mann, 2001)  Battle between cultures and values (Krause, 2005)  Inclusiveness and recognising what students bring (Hockings 2010; 2011)  Critiques  Compliance (Zyngier, 2008)  Serves a neo-liberal agenda (Zepke, 2014) AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 8. Transforming to? Becoming what? Seeing the world differently  Knowledge -Intellectually developed (ways of knowing – self authorship)  A critical being – learning, reflection and evaluation  A social being and (global) citizen – morality and ethics The danger of being prescriptive! AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 9. The value of engagement after HE  Integrated development of the whole person (and ‘disposition’)  Graduateness and graduate attributes (Barrie, 2007)  Graduate identity (Holmes, 2001) and USEM (Yorke and Knight, 2006)  The whole HE experience – thus the extracurricular is vital – authentic experiences  The engaged students tends to take up more opportunities AND are better able to join them up in their thinking AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 10. Key influences on engagement 1. Student expectations and perceptions – match to the ‘personal project’ and interest in subject 2. Sufficient challenge and appropriate workload 3. Degrees of choice, autonomy, risk, and opportunities for growth and enjoyment 4. Trust relationships 5. Communication and discourse 6. A sense of belonging and community 7. Supportive social networks 8. Opportunities for, and participation in activities and roles – to enable ownership, self-assurance and self-efficacy AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 11. A revised definition of SE Student engagement is about what a student brings to Higher Education in terms of goals, aspirations, value and beliefs and how these are shaped and mediated by their experience whilst a student. SE is constructed and reconstructed through the lenses of the perceptions and identities held by students and the meaning and sense a student makes of their experiences and interactions. As players and shapers of the educational context, educators need to foster educational, purposeful SE to support and enable students to learn in constructive and powerful ways and realise their potential in education and society. AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 12. Principles of engaging students 1. Foster student’s willingness and readiness to engage by enhancing their self-belief 2. Embrace the point that students have diverse backgrounds, expectations, orientations and aspirations – thus different ‘ways of being a student’, and to welcome, respect and accommodate all of these in an inclusive way 3. Enable and facilitate trust relationships (between staff:students and students:students) in order to develop a discourse with each and all students and to show solidarity with them 4. Create opportunities for learning (in its broadest sense) communities so that students can develop a sense of competence and belonging within these communities 5. Teach in ways to make learning participatory, dialogic, collaborative, authentic, active and critical AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 13. 6. Foster autonomy and creativity, and offer choice and opportunities for growth and enriching experiences in a low risk and safe setting. 7. Recognise the impact on learning of non-institutional influences and accommodate these 8. Design and implement assessment for learning with the aim to enable students to develop their ability to evaluate critically the quality and impact of their own work. 9. Work in partnership at all opportunities by seeking to negotiate and reach a mutual consensus with students on managing workload, challenge, curriculum and assessment for their educational enrichment – through a partnership model – without diluting high expectations and educational attainment; by developing mechanisms for all students to democratically participate in all aspects of the university that impact directly or indirectly on them. 10. Enable students to become active citizens and develop their social and cultural capital. AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 14. So what works? Kuh (2008) i. First year seminars (e.g. SI and PAL) ii. Learning communities – cross module iii. Service learning – experiential iv. Common intellectual experiences v. Writing intensive courses vi. Collaborative projects vii. Undergraduate research viii. Diversity learning ix. Internships x. Capstone courses AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 15. Engaging students in the curriculum  Active learning  Assessment for learning/peer assessment  Choice within the module -Integrated projects  Collaborative learning and building trust relationships  Authenticity  Taking risks – opportunities to reflect on mistakes AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 16. Engaging students outside the curriculum  Engaging experiences which enable student to build confidence, develop and learn  101 opportunities to be as attractive and inclusive as possible  Showing that we as staff value that….recognising  And what about joining this with the curriculum? AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 17. How to create strong engagement? PARTNERSHIP AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 18. The Student Engagement Agenda  Now embedded across the sector – in strategy and in practice with a wide range of examples and initiatives  Universal agreement that the student experience matters and that the student voice matters  At least partially addressing the alienating forces – although some are more intractable…  And sometimes the SE agenda can be appropriated (that neoliberal and managerialist agenda)  But strong engagement is about more than that –  Enabling transformative learning and becoming AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 19. The virtues of partnership Epitomises positive values in society  Ethical  Democratic  Enables Higher Education to a make a more profound contribution to society  Education should be exemplary but also dynamic, be progressive and ‘public’ AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 20. The ethos of partnership Principles of respect, repricocity and responsibility The individual student must perceive:  That their participation and contribution is valued and valuable;  A sense of co-ownership, inclusion, and equalising of power relations between students and staff;  A sense of democracy, with an emphasis on participative democracy;  Membership of a community related to learning and educational context And this needs to be realised in practice – a virtuous circle AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 21. Partnership Practices Healey, Flint and Harrington (2014) A typology of SaP roles e.g.  Consultant to staff  Co-designing  Co-researching  Change-agent Focussed on SoTL, curriculum, QA, subject based Characterised by individual students working with closely with staff AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 22. Benefits of partnership (Cook-Sather, Bovill and Felten, 2014) Enhances (for both students AND staff)  Engagement (motivation, in the learning process itself, sense of responsibility, recognition)  Metacognitive awareness and identity  Actual teaching and classroom experiences AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 23. A holistic approach to a degree programme  Combined Honours at Newcastle  Diverse and complex  Individuals doing unique degree  Missing sense of identity/ belonging  But few resources and so difficult to influence the curriculum So how to address? AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 24. Involving the students  Student representation:  Student-Staff Committee  Empowerment- Student led, working groups  Active agenda – providing solutions  The engine room of change  Success stories Little things and bigger things  Inclusion for CH students  Exam feedback  Combined Honours Week  Module co-design AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 25. Enhancing engagement in Combined Honours  Peer mentoring – social integration  PASS scheme – academic integration Both schemes student led but strong staff support AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 26. Enhancing engagement in Combined Honours  Building community:  Facilities and spaces  Social agenda – the CHS  Joining it all up – events and activities are shared and promoted by all parties  Overlap of roles  The Graduate Development modules – rewarding good practice and enabling projectsAIT/GMIT seminars
  • 27. Reflections on the CH strategy  Involves at least 50 students per year –over 10%  Wider opportunities for involvement – other projects, internships etc, and as recipients  Evolving and growing – had very good outcomes but needs constant refreshment (‘keeping it radical’) and emergence/supply of student ‘champions’ to maintain continuity  Outcomes very strong – massive improvement in quality of student experience – strong evidence of that (cohort surveys etc) – 100% satisfaction in the NSS AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 28. Challenges and barriers  Can you think of any? AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 29. Challenges and barriers Will depend on context, who the students and staff are:  Student lack expertise  Everybody is too busy  What’s in it for us?  Counter to values of staff AND/OR of students  Lack of confidence  How do I start?  Scaling it up AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 30. Trickier challenges  The power differential – what about assessment?  Can we create opportunities for all students (and are attractive to all)?  Keeping it exciting/new each time  Raising expectations – should all education and the experience be like this?  Managing disagreement  The issue of risk AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 31.  Attempt to create and embed a partnership ethos and culture FOR ALL STUDENTS  Collective, group based  Through the curriculum  Get partnership going earlier in student life-cycle Within Modules – Year 1: c160 students on interdisciplinary module – in 2014-15 Year 2 and 3 – Graduate development module options (c25 students per year) - in 2013-15 Year 3 – independent studies module option (c40 students) - in 2013-15 Bringing in Model B AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 32. Partnership within modules  Doing as much as possible in partnership, includes co-deciding: Shape and delivery (in part) of the module The types of assessment and weighting Deadlines Criteria (and thus learning outcomes)  Modules also feature ‘pedagogies of partnership’ to at least some extent AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 33. Issues  Students sign up for the module and not necessarily partnership  Some don’t like partnership– it actually disengaged them – a sense of frustration as ‘too much risk’ and unwanted responsibility that did not chime with their aims  More challenging for students at earlier degree stage  Tension between democratic principles vs ethics; collective v individual  Module feedback is interesting! AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 34. Early evaluation  Pre-disposition to partnership helps!  The more engaged in the first place  Identity, values and beliefs (ethical position)  Stage of intellectual development  Partnership appears to be a threshold concept (Alison Cook-Sather) But lots of potential….and a combination of model A and B seems to be the way… AIT/GMIT seminars
  • 35. Some advice  Start small  Be patient  Form alliances  Don’t coerce or rush in – induct and nurture  Be conscious of your behaviour and how it is perceived  Seek advice  Learn from mistakes AIT/GMIT seminars