Political Sociology 1 Week 2: Theories of Power
Who Rules?“The governments don’t rule the world,Goldman Sachs rules the world.” Alessio Rastani, T...
Who Rules?“The governments don’t rule the world,Goldman Sachs rules the world.” Alessio Rastani, T...
3 Approaches Marxian Weberian Elitist PluralistNeo-Marxist
Marx:Capital & the State
Marx:Capital & the State
Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodel
Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodel
Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodelThe arbiter model
Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodelThe arbiter modelThe functionalistmodel
Hegemony
HegemonyGaining consent
HegemonyGaining consentCreatingcommonsense
HegemonyGaining consentCreatingcommonsenseMobilising Goodsense
Max Weber: Pluralist Elitist or Elitist Pluralist?
Elitism: Good or Bad?
Elitism: Good or Bad? Lions & Foxes
Elitism: Good or Bad? Lions & Foxes The ‘iron rule of oligarchy’
Elitism: Good or Bad? Lions & Foxes The ‘iron rule of oligarchy’ Elitism v...
Pluralising politics
Pluralising politics Bellamy’s functional representation
Pluralising politics Bellamy’s functional representation Dahl’s Polyarchy
Pluralising politics Bellamy’s functional representation Dahl’s Polyarchy Kymlicka’s group rights
Case Study: HackgateIn groups:What are the mainelements of the case?Which elements ofMarxist, elitist, orpluralist theorie...
of 24

Political Sociology Week 2: Theories of Power

his week we will be examining classical theories of political sociology examining the origins of political power. Marx and Weber have generally been seen as instigators of the two main currents in political sociological understandings of state power. Marx and Marxists have emphasised the role of capitalism in creating class divisions that stratify society. Max Weber has been credited with spawning both elitist and pluralist theories. While elitism argues that power is basically controlled by the same culturally reproduced group of power-mongers over generations, pluralists believe that power can be influenced by various groups in civil society exerting pressure on the centre of power. Marxists tend to have a class-based explanation of the state, emphasising its determination by economic structural factors and the way in which states are driven by capitalist rather than democratic priorities. They see the state as subordinate to particular economic interests rather than as balanced between the interests of plural groups in society. There are, however, differences of emphasis amongst Marxists and within the writings of Marx himself on the question of precisely how and to what extent the state is subordinate to capitalist economic priorities. We shall look at these differences, in order to explain the complexities within Marxist thinking about the importance of the state for understanding society. This has been of crucial importance for the field of political sociology. Weber was pessimistic about the possibility of mass participation in modern nation-states. He emphasised the role of parliament as a training ground for politicians rather than as a democratic arena. He suggested that parties tend to subvert parliaments and stressed the role of charismatic leadership. He also analysed processes of rationalisation and bureaucratisation, the distinctiveness of the modern nation-state, the importance of legitimacy and authority and the way in which classes and other sorts of groups struggle for power.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      News & Politics      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Political Sociology Week 2: Theories of Power

  • 1. Political Sociology 1 Week 2: Theories of Power
  • 2. Who Rules?“The governments don’t rule the world,Goldman Sachs rules the world.” Alessio Rastani, Trader
  • 3. Who Rules?“The governments don’t rule the world,Goldman Sachs rules the world.” Alessio Rastani, Trader
  • 4. 3 Approaches Marxian Weberian Elitist PluralistNeo-Marxist
  • 5. Marx:Capital & the State
  • 6. Marx:Capital & the State
  • 7. Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodel
  • 8. Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodel
  • 9. Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodelThe arbiter model
  • 10. Marx:Capital & the StateThe instrumentalmodelThe arbiter modelThe functionalistmodel
  • 11. Hegemony
  • 12. HegemonyGaining consent
  • 13. HegemonyGaining consentCreatingcommonsense
  • 14. HegemonyGaining consentCreatingcommonsenseMobilising Goodsense
  • 15. Max Weber: Pluralist Elitist or Elitist Pluralist?
  • 16. Elitism: Good or Bad?
  • 17. Elitism: Good or Bad? Lions & Foxes
  • 18. Elitism: Good or Bad? Lions & Foxes The ‘iron rule of oligarchy’
  • 19. Elitism: Good or Bad? Lions & Foxes The ‘iron rule of oligarchy’ Elitism vs. Marxism
  • 20. Pluralising politics
  • 21. Pluralising politics Bellamy’s functional representation
  • 22. Pluralising politics Bellamy’s functional representation Dahl’s Polyarchy
  • 23. Pluralising politics Bellamy’s functional representation Dahl’s Polyarchy Kymlicka’s group rights
  • 24. Case Study: HackgateIn groups:What are the mainelements of the case?Which elements ofMarxist, elitist, orpluralist theories bestdescribe the case?Create a tag cloud tosummarise the politicalsociological analysis ofHackgate (small, medium,large).