Join the TiBBS community!
Follow us on
Facebook
+ Twitter
p.1
Upcoming TIBBS-sponsored events:
Biotechnology and Drug
Deve...
p.2
Session 1 | Kickoff Workshop on Active Learning
Thursday, June 6, 1:00-5:00 pm in Kirkland Auditorium in Koury Oral He...
Getting your foot in the
biotech/pharma door -
Inside advice for
industry-facing students
and postdocs
June 13, 2:30-4 pm
...
Biography: Dr. Shantá Hinton received a bachelor’s degree
in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill ...
p.5
Continued on p. 9
If you were to listen to an introductory neuroscience class in
which synaptic transmission was being...
p.6
The GMO debate: Ideology versus ScienceBy Amanda Natalizio
I admit that I am a left-leaning scientist who enjoys pokin...
p.7
it should be pointed out that there is more evidence in support of GMO safety than climate change, yet many of the lef...
p.8
nity to design a new laboratory from scratch, which took one year to establish and was a lot of work on top of teachin...
DAR activity made good sense, as the postsynaptic NMDA receptor is permeable to calcium, which is required for many of its...
Calendar June
2013
p.10
Click here to view seminars,
workshops/events, and TIBBS
events on our TIBBS calendar.
-----------...
Cheap Things
JUNE
2013
p.11
for an afternoon of outdoor games and learn about fatherly neighbors in nature. All ages. http...
Cheap Things
JUNE
2013
p.12
UNC Campus Recreation Intramural Sports
http://campusrec.unc.edu/getting-involved
Runs:
For a ...
Cheap Things
JUNE
2013
p.13
Carolina Theatre’s “Retrofantasma” film series:
A monthly film series of double-features dedic...
Cheap Things
JUNE
2013
p.14
Carolina Brewery:
http://www.carolinabrewery.com/carolina_brewery_news.html
City Beverage, Dur...
of 14

Natalizio_TIBBSTimes_2013

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Natalizio_TIBBSTimes_2013

  • 1. Join the TiBBS community! Follow us on Facebook + Twitter p.1 Upcoming TIBBS-sponsored events: Biotechnology and Drug Development will share her years of experience advis- ing students and postdocs about career opportunities in the life science industry. Learn about these topics: • Career paths in academia, industry and government—how they compare, what it is like to work in industry • Job search strategies and networking: finding a job in industry • How to make the transition from academia to industry • Tips for optimizing a resume for the life sci- ences industry • What to look for in a company • Job Hunting for Ph.D.s and Postdocs: How to Stand Out and Get Hired • How the current economy is affecting life science jobs Please join us for a reception immediately follow- ing the presentation (approximately 4:00 pm). For more information and to register: http://tinyurl. com/orgvofn TIBBS Smoothie Social: Thursday, June 27th at noon on the MBRB Lawn Come out and enjoy some sun and refreshing fruit smoothies with your fellow graduate students! No registration is required, but please bring your One Card to be served. Coming in July: a Career Networking Lunch with Dana Peles, PhD, Industrial Postdoctoral Fellow at GlaxoSmith- Kline, a manuscript-writing workshop with Banalata Sen, PhD, and a Ben & Jerry’s ice cream social! TIBBS Summer Series: Certificate in Teaching: Starting Thursday, June 6 Are you interested in improv- ing your teaching skills? Do you want to teach at the undergraduate or graduate level? This summer TIBBS is offering a series of workshops and panel discussions to help life science graduate students and postdocs learn how to: • Become an effective teacher • Design a course • Manage a classroom • Involve undergraduates in research • Get a job at a teaching-intensive institu- tion This series consists of eight workshops, seminars, and panel discussions. Students and postdocs who attend the first session and at least 5 of the 7 remaining workshops will earn a certificate. For more information, see the flyer on page 2 and the program website. To register: http://tinyurl.com/azxnaq8 Getting your foot in the biotech/ pharma door - Inside advice for industry-facing students and post- docs (Presenter: Toby Freedman, PhD): Thursday, June 13 at 2:30pm in the Kirkland Auditorium in Koury Oral Health Sciences Dr. Toby Freedman, Executive Recruiter and author of the book Career Opportunities in Upcoming TIBBS- Sponsored Events Flyers: TIBBS Summer Series, Toby Freedman, PhD CNL with Dr. Hinton Research Spotlight The GMO Debate TIBBS Trivia Pioneering Postdoc Cheap Things In this issue: The TIBBS Times Committee Erin Hopper, PhD|Editor-in- Chief Kennita Johnson, PhD|Senior Editor Destiney Buelto|Contributing Author and Editor Vicki Brings|Contributing Author and Editor
  • 2. p.2 Session 1 | Kickoff Workshop on Active Learning Thursday, June 6, 1:00-5:00 pm in Kirkland Auditorium in Koury Oral Health Sciences Presenters | Richard Felder, PhD Hoest Celanese Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering, NCSU Rebecca Brent, EdD, President of Education Designs, Inc. Highly sought-after speakers Drs. Felder and Brent have taught hundreds of workshops on effective teach- ing and mentoring methods. This in-depth workshop will cover the following topics and more: How can I get students actively engaged in learning, even with large class sizes?; How can I avoid common pitfalls?; What does research say about active learning? Session 2 | Designing a Syllabus Tuesday, June 11, 3:30-5:00 pm in MBRB G202 Presenter | Jennifer Coble, PhD, Lecturer, Biology Department, UNC Session 3 | Learning Assessment Tuesday, June 18, 3:30-5:00 pm in Bioinformatics 1131 Presenter | Ed Neal, PhD, President of Ed Neal and Associates, past Director of Faculty Development, UNC Session 4 | Managing the Classroom Thursday, June 20, 3:30-5:00 pm in Bioinformatics 1131 Presenter | Todd Zakrajsek, PhD, Executive Director of the Center for Faculty Excellence, UNC Session 5 | Interactive Undergraduate Laboratories Tuesday, June 25, 3:30-5:00 pm in Bioinformatics 1131 Presenter | Corey Johnson, PhD, Lecturer, Biology Department, UNC Session 6 | Responding to Feedback Thursday, June 27, 3:30-5:00 pm in Bioinformatics 1131 Presenter | Donna Bailey, RN, PhD, Teaching and Learning Consultant, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNC Session 7 | Teaching our First Undergraduate Course Tuesday, July 9, 3:30-5:00 pm in Bioinformatics 1131 Presenters | Panel of Past and Present Spire Fellows: Victoria Newton, PhD, Current SPIRE Fellow; Christina Swanson, PhD, Current SPIRE Fellow; Kim Monahan, PhD, Former SPIRE Fellow and Instructor of Biology at the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics; Jason Andrus, PhD, Former SPIRE Fellow and Associ- ate Professor at Meredith College, Shannon Jones, PhD, Current SPIRE Fellow Session 8 | Developing your Teaching Statement, Portfolio, and Application Materials Thursday, July 11, 3:30-5:00 pm in Bioinformatics 1131 Presenter | Brian Rybarczyk, PhD, Director of Graduate Student Academic & Professional Development, UNC TIBBS SUMMER SERIES2013 Teaching Certificate Series Students, postdocs, faculty, and staff who attend the first workshop and at least 5 of the remaining sessions will receive a certificate of completion. UNC graduate student certificate earners will receive a book. For more information and a registration link, visit tibbs.unc.edu.
  • 3. Getting your foot in the biotech/pharma door - Inside advice for industry-facing students and postdocs June 13, 2:30-4 pm CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN THE LIFE SCIENCES INDUSTRY Learn about these topics: • Career paths in academia, industry and government—how they compare, what it is like to work in industry • Job search strategies and networking: finding a job in industry • How to make the transition from academia to industry • Tips for optimizing a resume for the life sciences industry • What to look for in a company • How the current economy is affecting life science jobs Please join us for a reception following the presentation (4:00 pm). Register to attend at http://tinyurl.com/orgvofn Toby Freedman, PhD Dr. Toby Freedman, Executive Recruiter and author of the book Career Opportunities in Biotechnology and Drug Development Kirkland Auditorium, Koury Oral Health Sciences Building p.3
  • 4. Biography: Dr. Shantá Hinton received a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and earned a PhD in Cellular and Developmental Biology from Howard University working with Dr. William Eckberg. Following graduate school, she completed a postdoc at Cold Spring Harbor Laborato- ries, working with Dr. Nicholas Tonks and studying pseudo- phosphatases. Dr. Hinton’s first faculty position was as an Assistant Professor at Hamp- ton University. Dr. Hinton has since changed institutions and currently teaches and leads a research laboratory with 10- 12 undergraduate students and one graduate student at the College of William and Mary. Dr. Hinton’s research fo- cuses on various functional characteristics of the pseudo- phosphatase map kinase serine/threonine binding protein (MK-STYX). Dr. Hinton’s full biography can be found here: http://www. wm.edu/as/biology/people/faculty/hinton_s.php Dr. Hinton spoke with a small group of students about her career in teaching and research at primarily undergradu- ate institutions. A summary of the conversation is detailed here: Did you have any teaching training during your post-doc? Dr. Hinton did not have any formal training in teaching. She remarked that Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories was an ex- tremely competitive research environment that did not fo- cus on teaching training. However, Dr. Hinton was assured that her research pedigree and good publications would make her attractive to teaching institutions and found this to be true. She remarked that at The College of William and Mary, candidates with high quality publications and research background will be hired even with little teach- ing experience as long as the individual has at least aver- age teaching skills. The belief is that teaching can be taught and improved, but research experience and quality is more p.4 important. Do you recommend a postdoc before pursuing a career in teaching and research at mostly undergraduate institu- tions? Yes! Dr. Hinton believes that the postdoc is an extremely important time to develop both as a scientist and a person. When starting the postdoc, it is important to discuss your teaching goals and establish a development plan with your advisor. Be sure to pick your postdoc topic wisely so that it will lead to your own independent research funding. Re- search faculty at a primarily undergraduate institutions are still required to publish papers and obtain grant funding. What is your teaching and research balance? Dr. Hinton found that the balance between teaching and research depends on the institution. The College of Wil- liam and Mary prides itself for strength in undergraduate research, and the faculty have a 50:50 balance between teaching and research. Currently there are no permanent teaching-only positions at The College of William and Mary. Depending on the course she is teaching, some semesters may permit more research time than others. For example, Dr. Hinton is currently teaching a seminar class that involves reading and discussing papers. This course does not involve a lab and is less time intensive, thus allowing more time for research. Other institutions may have a less equal balance between teaching and research. At Hampton University, Dr. Hinton was expected to teach many more classes and had very limited research time. Was it difficult getting started at the College of William and Mary? Dr. Hinton felt that setting up the laboratory was the hard- est part about getting started. She was given the opportu- By Rebecca Bauer Continued on p. 8 Career Networking Lunch with Dr. Shantá D. Hinton: Research and Teaching at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution
  • 5. p.5 Continued on p. 9 If you were to listen to an introductory neuroscience class in which synaptic transmission was being described, you would likely hear the terms “neurotransmitter receptor” and “post- synaptic cell” not more than a few words apart. This reflects the standard working schematic for electrochemical signaling in the brain, whereby neurotransmitter released by a presyn- aptic neuron diffuses across a synapse to bind to its cognate receptors on a nearby postsynaptic cell. The broad function of these receptors is quite clear- once neurotransmitter is bound, electrochemical changes in the postsynaptic cell confer infor- mation transfer in a unidirectional, feedforward manner. Much less intuitively understood are the neurotransmit- ter receptors that exist on the presynaptic neuron, located at or close by the neurotransmitter release site. What func- tion could these presynaptic receptors serve? What signaling mechanisms do they use? Dr. Benjamin Philpot’s laboratory (UNC Department of Cell Bi- ology and Physiology) has held a longstanding interest in a par- ticular class of neurotransmitter receptors, known as NMDARs, which localize both pre- and postsynaptically. Although the postsynaptic NMDARs are very well studied, little is known about their presynaptic counterparts (preNMDARs). In a new report in The Journal of Neuroscience, Postdoctoral Fellow Dr. Portia Kunz and colleagues in the Philpot lab probed the down- stream signaling cascades through which these receptors may function. Their results point to a highly unexpected mecha- nism of action, answering several key questions about these enigmatic receptors. The experimental setup for this research consisted of single cell electrophysiological recordings in a brain slice preparation. When neuronal firing was blocked in these cells, small electri- cal blips, known as miniature synaptic events, or “minis”, could be recorded. These minis reflected spontaneous neurotrans- mitter release, and thus provided a method for examining pre- synaptic activity. A change in the frequency of minis indicated a change in the probability of neurotransmitter release, a mechanism by which the presynaptic component to the synapse could be strength- ened or weakened. Thus, when the mini frequency was re- duced by selective blockade of preNMDARs, it signaled to the authors that these receptors were acting to tonically promote transmitter release. This result provided the necessary means to examine the important signaling players downstream of preNMDAR activity. Under conditions in which preNMDARs cannot signal properly (such as blocking a downstream signal- ing cascade), the change in mini frequency normally seen with preNMDAR blockade should be reduced or absent. Following verification that preNMDARs were present and functional in their preparation, the authors investigated the signaling cascades downstream of their activation. The major surprise came here, when calcium-dependent effects were ex- amined. Calcium is frequently described as a universal signal transducer in synaptic physiology, necessary for neurotrans- mitter release and also important for many postsynaptic re- ceptor effects. Looking for a calcium contribution to preNM- by Dan Albaugh Research Spotlight Uncovering the Signaling Mechanisms of a Presynaptic Neurotransmitter Receptor Pictured here are study co-authors Dr. Benjamin Philpot and Dr. Portia Kunz.
  • 6. p.6 The GMO debate: Ideology versus ScienceBy Amanda Natalizio I admit that I am a left-leaning scientist who enjoys poking fun at the climate change and evolution deniers of the right, but the recent anti-GMO campaign driven by the left has led me to more deeply contemplate how ideology can trump science. Emotionally charged, politicized discourse about such science topics swarms the internet via Facebook, Twitter, blogs, and the ever-entertaining comment section of online articles. Un- fortunately, such forms of communication are often lacking in scientific merit, and none more so than the hotly debated GMOs. Humans have been tinkering with plant and animal genetics through selective breeding for thousands of years, but the development of genetic engineering techniques enabled us to manipulate an organism’s DNA at a level and rate that was previously impossible. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are a relatively new technology and have been on the market since 1994. GM plants including soybeans, corn, and canola are typically engineered to grow faster, be more resilient to environmental extremes, enrich nutrients, be resistant to pes- ticides, or exhibit other beneficial characteristics. With the use of new technology comes fears of unknown consequences, but what are these fears and are they warranted? Public attention to GMOs has mainly focused on the risk side of the risk-benefit equation. The concerns are broad: safety issues, ecological concerns, and economic issues with regard to intellectual property law. While I believe we should be ad- dressing all of these important topics, I want to focus on the safety of GM food consumption as it relates to nutrition and health. There is currently a lot of dialogue going on about GMOs, but unfortunately, ideology clouds the discussion with misinformation. Many of the concerns raised by both sides of the story can be backed up with legitimate, fact-based argu- ments, but science can provide clear answers. Toxicity, allergenicity, instability of the inserted gene, and neg- ative nutritional impacts are potential GMO risks to human health. These risks can be assessed and properly managed, but consumers question the validity of risk assessments since the FDA does not require biotech companies to do premarket safe- ty testing. The American Medical Association, a supporter of GMO technology, also recommends mandatory safety testing. Fortunately, every company that has brought a GM food into the market has voluntarily complied, and hundreds of inde- pendent studies are in support of the scientific consensus that the genetically engineered crops currently on the market are safe to eat. Even with such evidence, people are still particu- larly concerned with the lack of evidence on long-term effects. The reality is that GMOs already make up a large percent of our diet. A recent poll conducted by the Food Policy Institute at Rutgers’ Cook College revealed that while plant based GMOs can be found in nearly 70% of the food currently stocked at your local grocer, only 52% of Americans knew that GM foods were sold in grocery stores, and only 26% believed they had ever eaten them. Trillions of meals made with GM foods have been consumed after nearly two decades of commercializa- tion, yet no adverse health effects have been associated with genetically engineered crops. We’ve essentially had the evi- dence right on our dinner plates. There is no need to be con- cerned with the long- or short-term safety of GM foods cur- rently on the market, though one may rightfully argue that our regulation system is flawed. In addition to the lack of mandatory GMO safety assessments, government employees that have jumped ranks from the crop industry raise concerns about the objectivity of regulatory au- thorities such as the FDA. Previous big crop industry employ- ees can be found in the FDA, the Supreme Court, and congress. Although this apparent conflict of interest must be addressed, HOW ARE YOU TODAY?The Discussion Section -- Thoughts and Opinions from UNC’s Graduate Students -- Photo Credit genetic experiment image by NiDerLander from Fotolia.com
  • 7. p.7 it should be pointed out that there is more evidence in support of GMO safety than climate change, yet many of the left-leaning climate change supporters advocate against GMOs. Anti-GMO activists say they are leery of the published research on GMO safety because they believe that most of the studies were funded by the crop industry. This point can be easily dismissed, since all conflicts of interest and funding sources are listed in reputable scientific journals. Therefore, one can systematically weed out studies with conflicts of interest, and find that there remains an abundance of data in support of GM food safety. Where then does this anti-GMO sentiment come from if not sup- ported by the science? Anti-GMO activists often make the argument that GM technology tampers too deeply with nature, and thus, we do not know the consequences. This ideology is not based on scientific fact, and GMO opponents often skew the science in their favor. One or two studies, taken out of context in relation to an entire body of research do not make a strong case against GM food safety. Additionally, interpretation, especially by those with ideological or financial bias, is always a precarious thing. Peer reviewed re- search is highly respected, in part, because it dilutes the bias of one individual. Misrepresentation of science by those that can’t understand the primary literature is at the root of how ideology can trump science. Ideological extremism can lead to anti-science no matter which end of the spectrum you occupy. We must all be aware of our biases and how our ideology may affect our communication and evaluation of scientific evidence, particularly scientific evidence we would prefer not to be true. Scientific priority is to contribute to the improvement of human and environmental health with- out compromising public safety. Considering the dynamic nature of the GM food debate, legislation and regulatory agencies rec- ommendations are likely to continually evolve, and it is vital that we strive to base our assertions on facts rather than ideology. It seems that GMOs are here to stay, so we must be more effective communicators of science, eliminate the propaganda, and establish proper regulatory standards to ensure we accurately balance the risk to benefit ratio of GM technology. Dog- matic rejection of the use of ge- netic modification in agriculture is an unwise ideology. In an age of over-population and global warming, we need every tool in the toolbox to ensure adequate food production. GMOs are likely to play a vital role in agriculture and other important resources, such as drugs and biofuels, so we must ensure that science always trumps ideology. References: Hallman, W. K., Hebden, W. C., Aquino, H.L., Cuite, C.L. and Lang, J.T.. 2003. Public Perceptions of Genetically Modified Foods: A National Study of American Knowledge and Opinion. (Publication number RR-1003-004). New Brunswick, New Jersey; Food Policy Institute, Cook College, Rutgers - The State University of New Jersey. About the author: Amanda Natal- izio is a doctoral student in the Curriculum in Genetics and Mo- lecular Biology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and works in the laboratory of Dr. Greg Matera. Her research has focused on the import pathway of small nuclear (sn)RNPs in the Drosophila model system.
  • 8. p.8 nity to design a new laboratory from scratch, which took one year to establish and was a lot of work on top of teaching and research. Luckily, she had many eager undergraduate students who helped her set up the laboratory. She was fortunate that another faculty member provided research space for her lab so that she could continue her research while her new lab space was undergoing renovation. How do the facilities at a mostly undergraduate institution differ from larger research institutions? Dr. Hinton believes there is a misconception that all undergraduate institutions have poor facilities. In fact, Dr. Hinton be- lieves that the College of William and Mary has great facilities, and she is currently working on establishing a proteomics core facility. She explains that if an institution really wants you, they will likely set you up with the facilities that you need. However, she warned that human research at undergraduate institutions is difficult as it is highly regulated and requires extensive paperwork. How do you approach teaching undergraduate students in the laboratory? Dr. Hinton currently mentors 10-12 undergraduate students in her lab and 1 graduate student, and she noted that other labs at The College of William and Mary may have upwards of 20 students. She encourages undergraduate students to start research as soon as possible and accepts students in her lab as early as the spring semester of freshman year. She also understands that some students are less certain about research and is willing to accept more advanced students even if they have no research experience. She finds that some students are more involved and committed to the research, while others may act as “floaters” who spend less time in the lab. Dr. Hinton explained that she does not change her research focus or intensity to cater to undergraduate students. She expects that her students publish and pursue their own summer funding. A system that has worked well for her is dividing the undergraduate students into teams that focus on specific research areas. How do undergraduate students differ from graduate students? Dr. Hinton remarked that The College of William and Mary may differ from other institutions because it attracts a subset of students that are very driven and understand the importance of research. She has found that the undergraduate students have a better understanding of a research experience than graduate students who came from other institutions that were not as focused on research. Any final advice? Dr. Hinton’s final advice is to pick your institution wisely. If you wish to pursue a competitive research, be sure that the institution gives you plenty of research time so that you can continue publishing and applying for grants. If your institution does not provide you much research time, you may have trouble publishing and obtaining grants. Spend the time to seek out the environment that offers what you want. About the author: Rebecca Bauer is a doctoral student in the Curriculum in Toxicology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and works in the laboratory of Dr. Ilona Jaspers. Her research is focused on understanding the mechanisms by which airway diseases and air pollution alter lung immunology. Career Networking Lunch with Dr. Shantá D. Hinton: Research and Teaching at a Primarily Undergraduate Institution Continued from p. 4 TIBBS Trivia Contest: Name That Scientist! Let’s exercise our brains with some TIBBS trivia! The first UNC graduate stu- dent with a correct response will win a UNC water bottle! Five runners up will receive a delicious candy bar! Here’s how to play: 1. Like us on Facebook 2. The trivia question will be posted on our wall a few minutes after distrib- uting the TIBBS Times. 3. Email your answer to erin_hopper@unc.edu. Good luck!
  • 9. DAR activity made good sense, as the postsynaptic NMDA receptor is permeable to calcium, which is required for many of its downstream signaling actions. To test for a role of calcium in the receptor’s activity, neurons were bathed in a calcium-free solution. If calcium is important for downstream preNMDAR signaling, then preNMDARs should not function in this nominal calcium preparation. Yet, this was not the observed result - preNMDAR blockade revealed functional receptors, even in the absence of calcium. This finding strongly suggested an unexpected, calcium-independent mechanism of preNMDAR action. Although it may be that preNMDARs may normally operate in a calcium-dependent manner, the authors clearly showed some preNMDARs functions can continue even in the absence of calcium. How is it that these preNMDARs modulate presynaptic activity in the absence of calcium? In addition to altering ionic permeability, many neurotransmitter receptors promote synap- tic changes through slower-onset biochemical changes. For example, protein phosphorylation can alter the sensitivity of the neurotransmitter release machinery, with direct consequences for synaptic function. When protein kinase activity was first inhibited, preNMDAR blockade no longer affected mini frequency. This was the first time the authors observed such an effect. Follow-up experiments revealed that Protein Kinase C (PKC) might be the downstream effector of preNMDAR action in this con- text, likely through calcium-independent actions. The work of Kunz, et al. represents a major step forward in presynaptic receptor physiology, shedding light on the mechanisms by which the poorly understood preNMDARs function. The identification of an unexpected, calcium-independent mechanism of action is especially interesting, given the central role of this ion in the regulation of neurotransmitter release. Yet the preNMDAR story is not complete, and many questions remain. What are the targets of PKC in the context of preNMDAR activity, and how do they contribute to the receptor’s presynaptic effects? More broadly, much is still to be learned about the role of these receptors in brain development, as well as sensory processing and cognition. Thanks to this new work, neuroscien- tists are now a step closer towards understanding these mysterious receptors. Reference Kunz PA, Roberts AC, Philpot BD (2013). Presynaptic NMDA receptor mechanisms for enhancing spontaneous neurotransmitter release. The Journal of Neuroscience 33(18): 7762-9. Dan Albaugh is a 3rd year graduate student in the Neurobiology Curriculum. His current research focuses on the therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s Disease. p.9 Continued from p. 5 ------------------------- ------------------------- Pioneering Postdoc ProgramsBIOGEN IDEC POSTDOCTORAL PROGRAM, Cambridge, MA Biogen Idec is pleased to announce the initiation of a postdoctoral fellow research program. The program aims to support highly promising young scientists for three years of research within Bio- gen Idec laboratories. We are seeking creative independent scientists with a significant scientific record and experience. WHAT MAKES OUR PROGRAM SPECIAL: • Opportunities to do high quality, hypothesis-driven, fundamental research in a dynamic, fast-driving environment focused on drug discovery and development for serious human diseases. Work with Biogen Idec scientists on long-term scientific projects to bring novel cutting edge technology and gain expanded knowledge in the areas of mutual interest for postdoc and Biogen Idec. • In addition to scientists looking for a first postdoctoral training, we welcome applicants for a second postdoctoral research experience. • Potential for academic mentor. • Researchers completing the Biogen Idec postdoc program may be eligible for three years’ worth of start-up support as they transition to faculty positions. FOR MORE INFORMATION & TO APPLY: For more information about our Postdoctoral Fellow Program, contact: DL-postdoc.program@biogenidec.com http://www.biogenidec.com/postdoctoral_fellow_program.aspx?ID=11451 Uncovering the Signaling Mechanisms of a Presynaptic Neurotransmitter Receptor
  • 10. Calendar June 2013 p.10 Click here to view seminars, workshops/events, and TIBBS events on our TIBBS calendar. ------------------------- Cheap Things June 2013 Groupon Groupon is a website that offers deals on things to do, services, and places to eat in your area. Living Social Offers one deal every day with discounts of up to 90% at local restaurants, bars, spas, theaters, and more. Our Local Deals Deals for the Greater Chapel Hill, Carrboro and Orange County Communities FATHER’S DAY EVENTS: DURHAM JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION Multi-cultural event celebrating the ending of slavery with entertainment, vendors, food, health fair and children’s activities. FREE admission. CCB Plaza, Corcoran & Parrish Streets. 4-10 p.m. Durham. http:// www.spectacularmag.com/NCJuneteenthCelebrationvendor.html BULL CITY CHILI CHALLENGE Annual event featuring sampling and judging of a wide selection of tasty chili showcasing lo- cal restaurants and produce. The area’s first cookoff sanctioned by the Chili Appreciation Society International! Purchase a tasting kit for $4 and you’ll be able to sample chilis and salsas from someof the area’s best cooks! 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Durham Central Park. http://www.heraldsun.com/durhamherald/x1592159165/Central-Park-up-for-the-challenge JUNE FOOD TRUCK RODEO DJ Piddipat (Pat Murray) will spin music from her prodigious music collection. Food Truck Rodeo will be at the park. Bring lawn chairs, blankets,picnics, or simply dance the night away. Pavilion at Durham Central Park. http://durhamcentralpark.org/event/food-truck-rodeo-june/ FAMILY FEATURE: DADDY AND ME GAME DAY June 16, 2013 from 2-3pm at the Crowder District Park in Apex. Take the family
  • 11. Cheap Things JUNE 2013 p.11 for an afternoon of outdoor games and learn about fatherly neighbors in nature. All ages. http://www.carolinaparent.com/ thingstodo/calendar/detail.php?Family-Feature-Daddy-and-Me-Game-Day-27962 SUPERHEROES AND SUPERDADS! June 16, 2013 from 9am-5pm at the Marbles Kids Museum in Raleigh. Superheroes and their sidekicks show off their superpowers at Marbles’ Father’s Day celebration. Design a superhero cape and mask. Experi- ment with the power of flight and feature dad in his own comic book with comic adventures art. Catch Man of Steel 3D in IMAX. http://www.carolinaparent.com/thingstodo/calendar/detail.php?Superheroes-and-Superdads-28006 JUNE EVENTS: Chapel Hill/Carrboro events: http://chapelboro.com/calendar/ Playmaker’s Theater: http://playmakersrep.org/ Chapel Hill Events this Month: http://eventful.com/chapelhill/events Chapel Hill Film Events this Month: http://movies.eventful.com/chapelhill Chapel Hill Concerts this Month: http://eventful.com/chapelhill/concerts LOCAL EVENTS CALENDARS Chapel Hill Event Calendar: http://events.triangle.com/search?city=Chapel+Hill&new=n&srad=50&st=event&swhat=&swhere=&swhen=Next+30+Days http://www.visitchapelhill.org/calendar/events/index.php?year=2013&month=01&day=1 Durham Event Calendar: http://events.triangle.com/search?city=Durham&new=n&srad=50&st=event&swhat=&swhere=&swhen=Next+30+Days http://www.durham-nc.com/visitors/event_cal.php Carrboro Citizen: http://twitter.com/#!/CarrboroCitizen http://www.carrborocitizen.com Raleigh Carrboro Events http://events.triangle.com/raleigh-nc/events/carrboro+events Independent Weekly: http://www.indyweek.com http://twitter.com/#!/indyweek ATHLETIC EVENTS Full Schedules available for every sport: http://www.goheels.com/
  • 12. Cheap Things JUNE 2013 p.12 UNC Campus Recreation Intramural Sports http://campusrec.unc.edu/getting-involved Runs: For a complete list of local runs and races: http://runwellnc.com/ Fleet Feet in Carrboro has weekly free Pub Runs, yoga, and 4, 10, ½ marathon, and marathon training workouts: http://www.fleet- feetcarrboro.com/ Some races in Chapel Hill: Father’s Day 5K Run/Walk. June 16, 2013 at 9am at The Streets at Southpoint in Durham. Maggiano’s Little Italy hosts a 5K run to benefit Make-A-Wish of Eastern North Carolina. Kids can enjoy a 1-mile fun run and 100-yard dash at 8:30am. Register online. http://www.carolinaparent.com/thingstodo/calendar/detail.php?Father-s-Day-5K-Run-Walk-28032 Chapel Hill Police Department’s Guardians of the Hill 5K, Benefitting N.C. Special Olympics. The inaugural Guardians of the Hill 5K, sponsored by the Chapel Hill Police Department, will benefit Special Olympics of North Carolina. The event will take place on Saturday, June 15th, 2013. Race day festivities will include informational booths set up by the CHPD, CHFD, Or- ange County Emergency Services and other public safety organizations. http://www.sportoften.com/events/eventDetails. cfm?pEventId=10569 THE ARTS AND SCIENCES Carolina Performing Arts: http://www.carolinaperformingarts.org/genres/all Shows at Cat’s Cradle, Carrboro: http://www.catscradle.com/schedule.html UNC Music Department Performances and Events: http://music.unc.edu/calendars/thecalendar UNC Ackland Art Gallery Calendar: http://www.ackland.org/OnView/current-exhibitions/index.htm Morehead Planetarium 250 E. Franklin St, Chapel Hill http://www.moreheadplanetarium.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=page&filename=show_schedule.html. $6 for students and chil- dren. Museum of Life and Science, Durham http://www.ncmls.org/visit $12.95 adults, $10.95 seniors 65+, $9.95 children (3-12) DSI Comedy Theatre Upcoming shows: http://www.dsicomedytheater.com/calendar/ Carrboro ArtsCenter: Craft workshops, dance classes, and live music. http://www.artscenterlive.org/
  • 13. Cheap Things JUNE 2013 p.13 Carolina Theatre’s “Retrofantasma” film series: A monthly film series of double-features dedicated to bringing classic horror movies back to the big screen in 35mm! Created in 1998, RETROFANTASMA has developed a large dedicated audience of horror movie enthusiasts whose desire to see their favorite terror flicks is matched only by their willingness to cheer at the screen. Tickets: $7. http://festivals.carolinatheatre.org/retrofantasma/ Varsity Theatre on Franklin St. The Varsity Theatre has been a landmark of Chapel Hill and Franklin Street for over 50 years. Since the Sorrell building was built in 1927, it has always housed a movie theater, starting with the original Carolina Theater and then the Village Theater before becom- ing home to the Varsity. http://www.varsityonfranklin.com/nowplaying.asp https://twitter.com/#!/varsitytheatre FOOD AND DRINK Comprehensive list of food and drink specials, bar events in the area: Carrboro Farmers’ Market 301 W. Main St., www.carrborofarmersmarket.com Saturdays 7 a.m.-noon (year-round) Wednesdays 3:30-6:30pm (starting April 13th) Pick your own fruits and vegetables: Check out these directories for local pick-your-own farms: http://www.ncfarmfresh.com/Directory.asp?product=&county=region&region=2&PYO=yes&SearchType=farms&submit=Sear ch http://www.pickyourown.org/NCpiedmont.htm CH Bar Specials: Frequently updated nightly bar specials in Chapel Hill https://twitter.com/#!/CHBarSpecials The Stagger- Chapel Hill/Durham/Raleigh area drink specials. www.thestagger.com Recession Tuesdays at ACME Carrboro All entrees $12.95 every Tuesday. Reservations highly recommended. http://www.acmecarrboro.com/pages/news.htm Tylers Taproom, Carrboro/Durham/Apex: http://www.tylerstaproom.com/happenings Rockfish Southpoint: 1/2 price bottles every Monday and Saturday $2 all drafts and free glass for featured beer every Thursday at 6pm and free appetizers 9pm-11pm. https://twitter.com/#!/RockfishNC First Fridays, Downtown Raleigh Art, Food, Music for free in downtown Raleigh http://www.godowntownraleigh.com/first-friday-raleigh
  • 14. Cheap Things JUNE 2013 p.14 Carolina Brewery: http://www.carolinabrewery.com/carolina_brewery_news.html City Beverage, Durham http://www.citybeverage-durham.com/ Broadstreet Cafe, Durham http://www.thebroadstreetcafe.com/events.html Bull City Homebrew: http://www.brewmasterstore.com/ Fifth Season Gardening Co., Carrboro: Gardening, Home, and Beer/Wine making supplies http://www.fifthseasongardening.com/ VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES UNC Hospitals Volunteer Information http://www.unchealthcare.org/site/volunteers/adult_volunteers United Way: Requires creating an account. Once registered, search by zip code for nearby volunteer events. http://volunteer.truist.com/triangle/user/login/?return_url=%2ftriangle%2fvolunteer%2fhome%2f&type=&__flash_message __=The+page+you+are+trying+to+reach+requires+you+to+log+in+or+register&__hs___flash_message__=ad9b4f32ce0331b6 64cebef21caae8fd2ab92f46 Habitat for Humanity: Orange County: http://www.orangehabitat.org/volunteer/ Durham: http://durhamhabitat.org/volunteer/volunteer-worksite.html Orange County Animal Shelter: http://www.co.orange.nc.us/animalservices/volunteers.asp

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