NASA Research & Research Missions: <br />Applications for Space Weather Forecasting<br />Michael Hesse<br />Chief, Space W...
Challenge Group 1<br /><ul><li>Understand solar eruptions
Observe solar eruptions
Understand their evolution in interplanetary space</li></li></ul><li>Present Missions: SOHO<br /><ul><li>Launch Dec. 2, 1995
Instruments operating normally (almost)
Current baseline mission (“BOGART”) includes:</li></ul>	-Transforming into supporting solar observatory<br />-Coronal imag...
Present Missions: STEREO<br /><ul><li>Launch Oct. 25, 2006
Instruments operating normally
Providing beacon data
At 2015 at opposite side of Sun</li></ul>Beacon (space weather) data – available ‘immediately’<br />SECCHI: ~7 256 X 256 ...
STEREO Orbits<br />4 yr.<br />3 yr.<br />Ahead @ +22o/year<br />2 yr.<br />1 yr.<br />Sun<br />Sun<br />Earth<br />1yr.<br...
STEREO: Advantage of Perspective<br />STEREO Behind<br />STEREO Ahead<br />SOHO, SDO<br />
STEREO: Advantage of Perspective – <br />SW Prediction<br />
Future Missions: Solar Dynamics Observatory<br /><ul><li>SDO launched February 23, 2010
Inclined geosynchronous orbit
Continuous 150Mbps downlink.
Dedicated ground station.
SWx data with approximate 15min delay
Five year prime mission
Operations starting in April 2010</li></li></ul><li>SDO Space Weather Data<br /><ul><li>EUV Variability Experiment Space W...
Ionospheric disturbance nowcasting (XUV/EUV flare response)
Input for GAIM (Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model)
Input for SOLAR2000 (solar irradiance model), for operational atmospheric, ionospheric, and neutral thermospheric wind models
First-ever near-realtime XUV and EUV flare monitor
Atmospheric Imaging Assembly Space Weather Goals:
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NASA Research & Research Missions: Applications for Space Weather Forecasting

Michael Hesse, 2010 American Astronautical Society Goddard Memorial Symposium
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NASA Research & Research Missions: Applications for Space Weather Forecasting

  • 1. NASA Research & Research Missions: <br />Applications for Space Weather Forecasting<br />Michael Hesse<br />Chief, Space Weather Laboratory<br />NASA GSFC<br />48th Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium<br />March 10, 2010<br />
  • 2. Challenge Group 1<br /><ul><li>Understand solar eruptions
  • 3. Observe solar eruptions
  • 4. Understand their evolution in interplanetary space</li></li></ul><li>Present Missions: SOHO<br /><ul><li>Launch Dec. 2, 1995
  • 5. Instruments operating normally (almost)
  • 6. Current baseline mission (“BOGART”) includes:</li></ul> -Transforming into supporting solar observatory<br />-Coronal imager<br />-Solar energetic particles for forecasting<br />-Solar wind data<br />-3-4h/day RT coverage<br />
  • 7. Present Missions: STEREO<br /><ul><li>Launch Oct. 25, 2006
  • 8. Instruments operating normally
  • 9. Providing beacon data
  • 10. At 2015 at opposite side of Sun</li></ul>Beacon (space weather) data – available ‘immediately’<br />SECCHI: ~7 256 X 256 images every hour <br /> IMPACT: 10 sec aves of B, 1 min aves solar wind moments and selected SEP fluxes<br /> PLASTIC: 1 minute resolution selected moments and fluxes<br /> SWAVES: 1 minute summaries of alternate frequencies (0.1-16 MHz)<br />
  • 11. STEREO Orbits<br />4 yr.<br />3 yr.<br />Ahead @ +22o/year<br />2 yr.<br />1 yr.<br />Sun<br />Sun<br />Earth<br />1yr.<br />Ahead<br />Behind @ -22o/year<br />Earth<br />2yr.<br />Behind<br />3 yr.<br />4 yr.<br />Heliocentric Inertial Coordinates<br />(Ecliptic Plane Projection)<br />Geocentric Solar Ecliptic Coordinates<br />Fixed Earth-Sun Line<br />(Ecliptic Plane Projection)<br />
  • 12. STEREO: Advantage of Perspective<br />STEREO Behind<br />STEREO Ahead<br />SOHO, SDO<br />
  • 13. STEREO: Advantage of Perspective – <br />SW Prediction<br />
  • 14. Future Missions: Solar Dynamics Observatory<br /><ul><li>SDO launched February 23, 2010
  • 15. Inclined geosynchronous orbit
  • 16. Continuous 150Mbps downlink.
  • 17. Dedicated ground station.
  • 18. SWx data with approximate 15min delay
  • 19. Five year prime mission
  • 20. Operations starting in April 2010</li></li></ul><li>SDO Space Weather Data<br /><ul><li>EUV Variability Experiment Space Weather Goals:
  • 21. Ionospheric disturbance nowcasting (XUV/EUV flare response)
  • 22. Input for GAIM (Global Assimilative Ionospheric Model)
  • 23. Input for SOLAR2000 (solar irradiance model), for operational atmospheric, ionospheric, and neutral thermospheric wind models
  • 24. First-ever near-realtime XUV and EUV flare monitor
  • 25. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly Space Weather Goals:
  • 26. Irradiance-calibrated images in 8 EUV/X-ray wavelengths
  • 27. Quicklook data (1kx1k images, movies of each wavelength covering past hour & day.)
  • 28. Helioseismic Magnetic Imager Space Weather Goals:
  • 29. Line of sight magnetograms every 50 sec
  • 30. Vector magnetograms every 10 min
  • 31. Essential products to drive models
  • 32. Far-side images, active region emergence</li></li></ul><li>Future Missions: Solar Orbiter<br /><ul><li>ESA mission with NASA contributions
  • 33. Elliptical orbit around the Sun with perihelion as low as 0.23 AU and with increasing inclination up to more than 30° with respect to the solar equator.
  • 34. Visible, extreme ultra violet, X-rays imaging, in situ plasma and fields
  • 35. NASA: EUV spectrometer (SWRI), Heliospheric imager (NRL), Suprathermal ion spectrograph (APL)
  • 36. Launch tbd</li></li></ul><li>Challenge Group 2<br />Understand the impact solar eruptions have in near Earth space and throughout the heliosphere<br />
  • 37. Present Missions: ACE<br /><ul><li>Launch Aug. 25, 1997
  • 38. Prime Solar Wind information source
  • 39. Fuel reserves until 2017 or 2018
  • 40. Almost full RT coverage
  • 41. RT plasma data limitations</li></li></ul><li>Future Missions: RBSP<br /><ul><li>Radiation Belt Storm Probes launch date: May 2012
  • 42. 2 S/C, 5.8RE apogee, 600km perigee, 10 degree inclination
  • 43. 2 year nominal mission lifetime
  • 44. The RBSP Space Weather (SW) broadcast will be a transmission like those on ACE and STEREO.
  • 45. NOAA studying ground station optimization.
  • 46. Ground processing for SWx products will be provided by receiving organization(s).
  • 47. Input regarding RT data products requested</li></li></ul><li>Challenge Group 3<br />Develop science models and data drivers that can<br /><ul><li>Predict solar eruptions
  • 48. Predict their impacts
  • 49. Predict space environment consequences
  • 50. Augment the sparse data coverage</li></li></ul><li>Modeling<br /><ul><li>NASA supports the development of space science models, including those with Space Weather applications
  • 51. Through LWS TR&T program
  • 52. Models run at CCMC in support of
  • 53. Forecasting centers
  • 54. Research
  • 55. Education
  • 56. Tool development for NASA missions and space weather interests
  • 57. Infrastructure development for transition to operation
  • 58. Collaborations with NSF</li></ul>Community Coordinated Modeling Center at GSFC<br />http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov<br />
  • 59. ENLIL Heliosphere Model<br />3D MHD equations solved from 21.5rs to 2 AU<br />Input at rotating inner boundary<br />(Coronal Models: WSA, MAS)<br />Output<br />Magnetic field<br />Velocity<br />Density <br />Temperature<br />Two operating modes<br />Ambient solution<br />CME modeling using Cone model approximation<br />D. Odstrcil, NASA/GSFC/GMU<br />
  • 60. Magnetic connectivity product<br />Based on WSA/ENLIL, input from AFWA<br />
  • 61. CME Simulation<br />
  • 62. Solar energetic particle forecasts<br />Solar Energetic Particle<br /> Forecast model <br />(M. Nunez, U. Malaga)<br />Solar Energetic Particle<br /> Forecast model <br />(A. Posner)<br />
  • 63. Magnetopause Position<br />Quiet magnetosphere<br />Active<br />magnetopause position<br />GOES 11&12<br />geosynchronous. orbit<br />Geosynchronous orbit inside Magnetopause<br />Magnetopause crossinggeosynch. orbit<br />
  • 64. RBSP Data Source for Assimilative Radiation Belt Model (DREAM) <br />GEO & GPS & Polar Observations<br />Data Assimilation Model<br />Modeled HEO Fluxes<br />Measured HEO Fluxes<br />R. Friedel/LANL<br />
  • 65. Neutral Atmosphere<br />Heating Rate<br />Drag<br />effects<br />
  • 66. Innovative Dissemination: iSWA<br />> 180 products iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov<br />
  • 67. Innovative dissemination: Google Earth<br />
  • 68. Conclusions<br />NASA SMD missions and priorities are driven by scientific objectives, including the goal to understand Space Weather<br />NASA missions can, do, and will provide substantial and critical space weather information<br />With the growing use of assimilative models, ingestion of NASA-provided data streams can create invaluable input into space science and space weather models<br />NASA is proud of its contributions to real-time Space Weather forecasting, and we look forward to working with the partner agencies in the future.<br />

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