HOT STUFF MUSEUM
DISPOSITION
FIRMOGRAPHICS
• Opened in 2011
• $20 million annual budget; $45 million endowment
• Permanent...
patron profile
HOT STUFF MUSEUM
Ms. Sam Cecil Shephard
Address: 1724 Luxour Street, Baltimore, MD 21224
Age: 37
Gende...
DEMOGRAPHIC DATA
from city-data.com (cross-referenced with livebaltimore.com)
Data source: 2013 U.S. Census
Geographic a...
PSYCHOGRAPHIC DATA
from the free snapshot components of the sources
Esri.com – Top Tapestry
(Environmental Systems Researc...
BALTIMORE MEDIA INFORMATION
a selection of media outlets in Baltimore, MD
PRINT - NEWSPAPER
• b - weekly publication, tar...
How can we cultivate this patron?
Context:
Business disposition: Hot Stuff Museum is the premier museum in the US for awes...
What would be your banner message to Sam? (i.e. What is the unique selling proposition?)
_________________________________...
DATA RESOURCES NOT ALL OF THEM, BUT GOOD PLACES TO START
factfinder.census.gov
A helpful tool that walks you through pulli...
of 8

Nampc contextual marketing_Patron Exercise

Contextual marketing handout - David Dombrosky, National Arts Marketing Project Conference 2015
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Marketing      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nampc contextual marketing_Patron Exercise

  • 1. HOT STUFF MUSEUM DISPOSITION FIRMOGRAPHICS • Opened in 2011 • $20 million annual budget; $45 million endowment • Permanent collection with 48,000 pieces of contemporary sculpture from around the world • 275,000 square feet of exhibition space • 5 galleries – 3 for rotating exhibits drawn from the permanent collection, 1 for special higher-profile exhibitions, and 1 for smaller temporary exhibitions • A 200 seat theatre • 65 full-time and 80 part-time staff members • Hours of operation: Tue-Sun from 10am-5pm, plus extended hours on Thurs until 8pm CATALOG • Rotating exhibits from the permanent collection • Special, temporary exhibitions from outside sources • Memberships and single ticket admissions • Educational classes and workshops • Lectures and performances • Galas and special events • Café food items and beverages • Gift shop merchandise STRATEGY • The museum has a strategic plan in place with the marketing goal of increasing membership by 18% over the next two years. • The museum’s competitive strategy focuses on leveraging special, temporary exhibitions to raise awareness and draw new audiences. • The patron relationship strategy focuses on moving patrons from single-attendance to multi-attendance to membership to donor. MARKET SEGEMTNATION • Hot Stuff Museum is the premiere museum in the United States for contemporary sculpture. • Hot Stuff Museum is a springboard for mid- career sculptors by providing them with their first nationally prominent solo exhibitions. SITUATION INVENTORY • Individual membership is $50/yr. Currently, 30,000 individual members contributing $1.5M to the annual budget • Family membership is $80/yr. Currently, 6,250 family members contributing $500K to the annual budget • General museum admission, non-members is $15. • Special exhibition admission, non-members is $25. This includes general admission to the museum. Personnel • During the annual membership drive, the museum employs a cadre of part-time marketing assistants for 60 days to directly contact current members for renewals and prospective members from the pool of last year’s multi admission buyers • The graphic designer is having a surgical procedure next week and will be unavailable for one week thereafter • The museum increases the number of staff at the Admissions Desk, café, and gift shop during special exhibitions to cover the increase in attendance Organizational Factors • The annual membership drive is supervised by the Marketing department, which hands off executed renewals and new memberships to the Membership department for on-going contact and support. • Tomorrow is the opening for a 12-week special exhibition of works by acclaimed sculptor Anish Kapoor (reference point: Chicago’s “Bean” sculpture). • A general operating support grant from the Maryland State Arts Council was awarded at 75% of the ask. Modest budget cuts are expected in all departments. Environmental Activity • The American Visionary Art Museum announced that it will be increasing its corporate sponsorship in order to provide free admission to Baltimore residents. • The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore recently entered into a reciprocal membership agreement with a consortium of museums across the country. Members at the Supporter Level now receive privileges and free admission at over 40 museums around the U.S. • Last week, Hurricane Zelda inflicted $30,000 worth of damage to the roof in our smaller, temporary exhibition gallery.
  • 2. patron profile HOT STUFF MUSEUM Ms. Sam Cecil Shephard Address: 1724 Luxour Street, Baltimore, MD 21224 Age: 37 Gender: Female Ethnicity: White Marital status: Single Transactional History Ticket revenue: $270.00 Fiscal Year 1 General admission: $15 General admission: $15 Fiscal Year 2 General admission: $15 General admission: $15 Lecture—Gothic Battlements: $25 Special event—Gala: $100 Fiscal Year 3 General admission: $15 General admission: $15 Lecture—Baroque Era: $25 Special event—Fashion Show: $30 membership revenue: $0.00 -- donation revenue: $0.00 -- NOTES Sam always purchases one ticket per visit. She visits exhibitions on Thursdays. Sam regularly visits jewelry and fashion arts exhibitions in our small gallery. Sam sometimes attends our educational classes and workshops. Sam attended both architectural exhibition lectures offered in the last three fiscal years.
  • 3. DEMOGRAPHIC DATA from city-data.com (cross-referenced with livebaltimore.com) Data source: 2013 U.S. Census Geographic area: 21224 – Baltimore, MD Neighborhood designation: Southeast Baltimore Canton Park, Greek Town, Little Italy, Patterson Park Large populations of residents with Polish, Greek, Italian and Hispanic ancestry make this one of the most ethnically diverse sections of the city. Waterfront communities like Butchers Hill, Canton and Fells Point are popular among young professionals due to two- and three-story row homes, downtown jobs, quaint shops, pubs and local eateries. Population: 49,552 The Hispanic population is above the State average. Average age of residents: 32.5 years. The largest age group is 21-34. Median age below State average. Average household size: 2.6 people Median household income: $55,085 (State median: $72,183) The cost of living is higher than the U.S. average. Median house/condo value: $185,000 Median gross rent: $1,135 The majority of residents in this zip code drive, carpool, or take the bus/trolley to work. Educational attainment: High school or higher: 75.3% Bachelor’s degree or higher: 29.8% Graduate or professional degree: 12.0% Top occupations: Legal occupations Architecture and engineering occupations Law enforcement workers including supervisors Computer and mathematical occupations Health diagnosing and treating practitioners Management occupations Gender Male 50% Female 50% Renters 41% Home owners 59% residency Never married 46.8% Married 35.4% marital status Separated: 3% Widowed: 5.1% Divorced: 9.6% Black 17% White 59% Ethnicity Asian: 2% American Indian: 1% Two or more races: 2% Hispanic 19%
  • 4. PSYCHOGRAPHIC DATA from the free snapshot components of the sources Esri.com – Top Tapestry (Environmental Systems Research Institute) Segment: 27 – Metro Renters Residents in this highly mobile and educated market live alone or with a roommate in older apartment buildings and condos located in the urban core of the city. This is one of the fastest growing segments; the popularity of urban life continues to increase for consumers in their late twenties and thirties. Metro Renters residents income is close to the US average, but they spend a large portion of their wages on rent, clothes, and the latest technology. Computers and cell phones are an integral part of everyday life and are used interchangeably for news, entertainment, shopping, and social media. Metro Renters residents live close to their jobs and usually walk or take a taxi to get around the city. Claritas.com - PRZM Segment: 04 – Young Digerati Tech-savvy and live in fashionable neighborhoods on the urban fringe. Affluent, highly educated, and ethnically mixed, Young Digerati communities are typically filled with trendy apartments and condos, fitness clubs and clothing boutiques, casual restaurants and all types of bars—from juice to coffee to microbrew. Management-level employment, graduate-level education. TYPICAL TRAITS • Strive to be sophisticated; value education and creativity • Become well informed before purchasing • Socializing and social status very important • Work long hours LEISURE ACTIVITIES • Yoga, Pilates, and downhill skiing • Travel overseas and domestically CULTURAL ACTIVITIES • Frequent museums and cinemas SHOPPING HABITS • Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Banana Republic, The Gap, Nordstrom, Bloomingdale’s, Crate & Barrel, Pier 1 Imports, amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com MEDIA HABITS • Use a tablet for reading newspapers and magazines • Favorite websites: Facebook and YouTube • Read Dwell, New York Times, history books • Listen to classical music, jazz, all-news, and public radio stations • Seldom watch TV, but prefer programs from Independent Film Channel, Travel Channel TAKEAWAYS jot down your preliminary thoughts on marketing to Sam
  • 5. BALTIMORE MEDIA INFORMATION a selection of media outlets in Baltimore, MD PRINT - NEWSPAPER • b - weekly publication, targeted at young adults • The Baltimore Sun - largest daily newspaper supplying coverage of news, events, people and industries • Baltimore Business Journal - business news from a local, regional, and national perspective • Baltimore City Paper - an alternative source of news and opinions on local politics, communities, culture, and the arts PRINT - MAGAZINES • Baltimore Magazine - award-winning feature stories about prominent local people, arts and culture, and sports • Baltimore Style - lifestyle magazine covering home and garden, fashion, food, travel, and local personalities • JHU Gazette - free monthly publication of the Johns Hopkins University, distributed at campuses • SoBo Voice - South Baltimore Peninsula area publication RADIO • WBAL - home of the Orioles, talk and news, leans conservative • WYPR - NPR affiliate • WCAO - Urban gospel • WBJC - classical • WCBM - talk radio, leans conservative • WLIF - adult contemporary • WEAA - jazz OUT OF HOME • Maryland Transit Administration offers advertising opportunities on buses, trains, and bus shelters • Private companies offer advertising opportunities on billboards, wallscapes, and bike hubs TELEVISION • Maryland Public Television (PBS) • WBAL-TV Channel 11 (NBC) • WBFF Channel 45 (FOX) • WJZ Channel 13 (CBS) • WMAR Channel 2 News (ABC) …and don’t forget about social media Designed by freepik.com
  • 6. How can we cultivate this patron? Context: Business disposition: Hot Stuff Museum is the premier museum in the US for awesome contemporary sculpture. We’re moving into a new fiscal year and are focused on membership acquisition. Business situation: The museum has many visitors who buy tickets to exhibitions and events, but are not members. There are many next steps that Sam could take, but your organization wants Sam to become a member. This objective is where you believe your business circumstance and Sam’s customer circumstance align. Sam’s disposition: As you can see in her patron profile, Sam has purchased tickets to multiple exhibitions and events at Hot Stuff Museum. What does the data suggest? Challenges: What are some reasons that Sam might say “NO”? 1. __________________________________________________________________ 2. __________________________________________________________________ 3. __________________________________________________________________ Opportunities: What are some ways that we might get her to say “YES”? 1. __________________________________________________________________ 2. __________________________________________________________________ 3. __________________________________________________________________ Sam’s situation: What’s one moment of need in which you could meet Sam’s needs? __________________________________________________________________________ What now? Where/when would you address your message to Sam? Where would Sam be? __________________________________________________ When would she get your message? ________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ HOT STUFF MUSEUM How can we cultivate this patron? Context: Business disposition: Hot Stuff Museum is the premier museum in the US for awesome contemporary sculpture. We’re moving into a new fiscal year and are focused on membership acquisition. Business situation: The museum has many visitors who buy tickets to exhibitions and events, but are not members. There are many next steps that Sam could take, but your organization wants Sam to become a member. This objective is where you believe your business circumstance and Sam’s customer circumstance align. Sam’s disposition: As you can see in her patron profile, Sam has purchased tickets to multiple exhibitions and events at Hot Stuff Museum. What does the data suggest? Challenges: What are some reasons that Sam might say “NO”? 1. __________________________________________________________________ 2. __________________________________________________________________ 3. __________________________________________________________________ Opportunities: What are some ways that we might get her to say “YES”? 1. __________________________________________________________________ 2. __________________________________________________________________ 3. __________________________________________________________________ Sam’s situation: What’s one moment of need in which you could meet Sam’s needs? __________________________________________________________________________ What now? Where/when would you address your message to Sam? Where would Sam be? __________________________________________________ When would she get your message? ________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________
  • 7. What would be your banner message to Sam? (i.e. What is the unique selling proposition?) ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ What three primary channels would you use to get your message to Sam? 1. ___________________________________ 2. ___________________________________ 3. ___________________________________ What three channels would you probably NOT use to get your message to Sam? 1. ___________________________________ 2. ___________________________________ 3. ___________________________________ What is the ideal call-to-action and/or offer? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ What specific action do you want Sam to take upon receiving the message? ___ call patron services ___ go to service counter ___ get online and sign up ___ mail something ___ Other: ____________________ What is Sam’s next most-likely action after receiving your message? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________
  • 8. DATA RESOURCES NOT ALL OF THEM, BUT GOOD PLACES TO START factfinder.census.gov A helpful tool that walks you through pulling data from the U.S. Census. bls.gov/cex/ Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES), provides information on the buying habits of American consumers, including data on their expenditures, income, and consumer unit (families and single consumers) characteristics. city-data.com Detailed, informative profiles of all cities in the United States. Free. claritas.com Home of Nielsen’s PRIZM® model, the industry- leading lifestyle segmentation system. Offers free snapshots of every segment, but full profiles require purchase. acorn.caci.co.uk It’s like PRIZM®, but for the United Kingdom. esri.com/landing-pages/tapestry Esri’s primary work is GIS (geographic information systems), and they acquire a lot of data. Tapestry is their segmentation system. Offers free snapshots, but you have to subscribe for the full service. You can try a 30-day free trial of ArcGIS Online, which is the system that houses Tapestry. PDF of cluster narratives: http://www.esri.com/ library/whitepapers/pdfs/community-tapestry.pdf srds.com Media planning and research. Not nearly as expensive as you’d expect. MarketResearch.com Database of expert insights on global industries, companies, products, and trends. Reports to fit most any budget. euromonitor.com Home of Passport, a robust global market research system. Also industry-specific data reports. Bigger and more expensive than you need, but if you can afford it, fascinating data. Principal Urban Centers: Young, mobile, diverse in metros of 2.5 + million people LIFEMODE SUMMARY GROUPS 1. Affluent Estates: Established wealth—educated, well-travelled married couples 2. Upscale Avenues: Prosperous, married couples in higher density neighborhoods 3. Uptown Individuals: Younger, urban singles on the move 4. Family Landscapes: Successful younger families in newer housing 5. GenXurban: Gen X in middle age; families with fewer kids and a mortgage 6. Cozy Country Living: Empty nesters in bucolic settings 7. Ethnic Enclaves: Established diversity— young, Hispanic homeowners with families 8. Middle Ground: Lifestyles of thirtysomethings 9. Senior Styles: Senior lifestyles reveal the effects of saving for retirement 10. Rustic Outposts: Country life with older families, older homes 11. Midtown Singles: Millennials on the move; single, diverse, and urban 12. Hometown: Growing up and staying close to home; single householders 13. Next Wave: Urban denizens; young, diverse, hardworking families 14. Scholars and Patriots: College campuses and military neighborhoods Urban Periphery: City life for starting families with single-family homes Metro Cities: Affordable city life, including smaller metros, satellite cities Suburban Periphery: Affluence in the suburbs, married couple-families, longer commutes Semirurals: Small town living, families with affordable homes Rural: Country living with older families, low density, and low diversity TAPESTRY SEGMENTATIONThe Fabric of America’s Neighborhoods TM FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT TAPESTRY SEGMENTATION • Call 1-800-447-9778 • Visit esri.com/tapestry • Send an e-mail to info@esri.com Copyright © 2014 Esri. All rights reserved. URBANIZATION SUMMARY GROUPS 1A 1B 1C 1D 1E 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 4A 4B 4C 5A 5B 5C 5D 5E 6A 6B 6C 6D 6E 6F 7A 7B 7C 7D 7E 7F Top Tier Professional Pride Boomburbs Savvy Suburbanites Exurbanites Urban Chic Pleasantville Pacific Heights Enterprising Professionals Laptops and Lattes Metro Renters Trendsetters Soccer Moms Home Improvement Middleburg Comfortable Empty Nesters In Style Parks and Rec Rustbelt Traditions Midlife Constants Green Acres Salt of the Earth The Great Outdoors Prairie Living Rural Resort Dwellers Heartland Communities Up an Urban Ameri Barrio Valley South Households: 2,052,000 Households: 1,878,000 Households: 1,695,000 Households: 3,543,000 Households: 2,320,000 Households: 1,574,000 Households: 2,674,000 Households: 870,000 Households: 1,627,000 Households: 1,240,000 Households: 1,734,000 Households: 1,264,000 Households: 3,327,000 Households: 2,058,000 Households: 3,319,000 Households: 2,973,000 Households: 2,675,000 Households: 2,411,000 Households: 2,685,000 Households: 3,043,000 Households: 3,794,000 Households: 3,517,000 Households: 1,850,000 Households: 1,307,000 Households: 1,215,000 Households: 2,864,000 Househo Househo Househo Househo Househ Househo Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Income Median Incom Median Incom Median Incom Median Incom Median Incom Median Incom Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Age Median Ag Median Ag Median Ag Median Ag Median Ag Median Ag 46.2 40.5 33.6 44.1 49.6 42.6 41.9 41.8 34.8 36.9 31.8 35.5 36.6 37.0 35.3 46.8 41.1 40.3 38.4 45.9 43.0 43.1 46.3 43.4 52.4 41.5 30.7 33.3 31.8 28.3 26.6 33.8 $157k $127k $105k $104k $98k $98k $85k $84k $77k $93k $52k $51k $84k $67k $55k $68k $66k $55k $49k $48k $72k $53k $53k $51k $46k $39k $64k $58k $48k $36k $32k $27k Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Singles Household Singles Household Singles Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples w/No Kids Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples w/No Kids Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples w/No Kids Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Household Married Couples Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Multi-Units; Single Family Housing High-Density Apartments Housing Multi-Unit Rentals Housing High-Density Apartments Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Family Housing Single Fam/Seasonal Housing Single Family 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 4 1 1 1 4 4 5 4 3 4 2 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 2 2 2 5 2 LifeMode 1: AFFLUENT ESTATES 11,488,000 Households 9.7% of US Households LifeMode 2: UPSCALE AVENUES 6,744,000 Households 5.7% of US Households LifeMode 3: UPTOWN INDIVIDUALS 4,238,000 Households 3.6% of US Households LifeMode 4: FAMILY LANDSCAPES 8,704,000 Households 7.3% of US Households LifeMode 5: GENXURBAN 13,787,000 Households 11.6% of US Households LifeMode 6: COZY COUNTRY LIVING 14,547,000 Households 12.2% of US Households E Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Own lavish vacation homes ■ Hire financial advisers ■ Shop at high-end retailers/chains ■ Access radio and newspapers online ■ Purchase/Lease fully equipped luxury cars Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Upgrade picture-perfect homes ■ Hold401(k)andIRAplans/securities ■ Own latest tablets, smartphones, and laptops ■ Read epicurean, sports, home service magazines ■ Own 2–3 vehicles Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Hold gym membership; own home equipment ■ Have home mortgage ■ Prioritize physical fitness ■ Own, use latest devices ■ Prefer SUVs, luxury cars, minivans Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Enjoy good food, wine ■ Carry first, second mortgages ■ DIY gardening, home remodeling ■ Shop, bank online ■ Prefer late-model SUVs minivans, station wagons Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Contract for home care services ■ Invest actively; use financial planners ■ Prefer natural, organic products ■ Support public TV/radio ■ Choose late-model luxury cars, SUVs Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Visit museums, art galleries ■ Own healthy portfolios ■ Ski; practice yoga; hike; play tennis ■ Shop, bank online ■ Choose luxury imports Prof/Mgmt/Svcs College Degree White ■ Enjoy outdoor gardening ■ Invest conservatively ■ Go to the beach, theme parks, museums ■ Have bundled services (TV/Internet/phone) ■ Own/Lease imported SUV Prof/Svcs/Mgmt College Degree Asian/Pacific Islander ■ Own iPods, iPads, newer Macs ■ Invest conservatively ■ Gamble at casinos; visit theme parks ■ Watch Showtime, HBO, Travel Channel, CNN ■ Choose imported, late-model vehicles Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Gamble; visit museums ■ Own 401(k) through work ■ Buy trendy clothes online ■ Watch movies, TV on demand ■ Buy digital books for tablet Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Support environmental groups ■ Save for retirement ■ Stay connected via laptop, iPad, mobile phone ■ Listen to classic rock, jazz, blues ■ Take public transportation; walk; bike Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Preferenvironmentallysafeproducts ■ Spend wages on rent ■ Practice yoga, Pilates; ski ■ Active on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, LinkedIn ■ Take public transportation, taxis; walk; bike Prof/Svcs/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Travel frequently ■ Seek financial advice; build stock portfolios ■ Shop at Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s ■ Stay connected; prefer texting ■ Choose subcompacts, public transportation Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Go jogging, biking, target shooting ■ Carry high level of debt ■ Visit theme parks, zoos ■ Shop, bank online ■ Own 2+ vehicles (minivans, SUVs) Prof/Svcs College Degree White ■ Eat at Chili’s, Chick-fil-A, Panera Bread ■ Invest conservatively ■ Shop warehouse/club, home improvement stores ■ Watch DIY Network ■ Own minivan, SUV Prof/Svcs College Degree White ■ Buy children’s toys, clothes ■ Carry some debt; invest for future ■ Go hunting, bowling, target shooting ■ Watch country, Christian TV channels ■ Own trucks, SUVs Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Play golf; ski; work out regularly ■ Save/Invest prudently ■ Prefer to eat at home ■ Listen to sports radio; watch sports on TV ■ Own 1–2 vehicles Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Support arts, theater, concerts, museums ■ Hold retirement savings, insurance policies ■ Use coupons, mobile coupons ■ Carry, use smartphones ■ Own late-model SUVs or trucks Prof/Mgmt/Admin HS Diploma Only White ■ Take US vacations ■ Budget wisely ■ Play blackjack, poker online ■ Watch Animal Planet, Discovery, History Channel ■ Own domestic truck or SUV Svcs/Prof/Admin HS Diploma Only White ■ Buy American-made products ■ Hold home mortgage ■ Play games online ■ Read newspapers; watch TV ■ Own 2–3 vehicles Prof/Svcs College Degree White ■ Attend church; are members of fraternal orders ■ Have retirement income, Social Security ■ Read; go fishing; play golf ■ Watch country, Christian TV channels ■ Own domestic SUVs, trucks Prof/Mgmt College Degree White ■ Are member of veterans’ club, fraternal order ■ Bank, pay bills online ■ Do home improvement projects ■ Watch TV by satellite ■ Own truck/SUV Prof/Svcs HS Diploma Only White ■ Go fishing, hunting, boating, camping ■ Buy insurance from agent ■ Tackle home improvement projects ■ Access Internet by dial-up modem ■ Own truck, ATV Prof/Svcs College Degree White ■ Belong to AARP, veterans’ clubs ■ Might invest in real estate ■ Own pet dogs or cats ■ Watch CMT, History Channel, Fox News ■ Own 4-wheel drive trucks Mgmt/Prof/Svcs HS Diploma Only White ■ Shop at Walmart; eat at Subway ■ Own CDs, term/whole life insurance ■ Go fishing, hunting, boating, camping ■ Read fishing, hunting, auto magazines ■ Own truck, ATV/UTV Svcs/Prof HS Diploma Only White ■ Tend vegetable gardens ■ Own low-risk assets ■ Go hunting, freshwater fishing ■ Watch Animal Planet, Discovery Channel, DIY Network ■ Own older, domestic vehicles Svcs/Prof HS Diploma Only White ■ Go hunting, fishing; ride motorcycles ■ Buy insurance from agent ■ Participate in local activities ■ Listen to country music; watch CMT ■ Own domestic truck, SUV PRIZM® segments

Related Documents