©
 Andy
 Blyth
 2014
 
Simply
 Perform
 
07590187014
 
Pressure Cheat Sheet
Some people love the feeling of ...
©
 Andy
 Blyth
 2014
 
Simply
 Perform
 
07590187014
 
Body Language
Many people are aware that their body l...
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Pressure Cheat Sheet

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pressure Cheat Sheet

  • 1. ©  Andy  Blyth  2014   Simply  Perform   07590187014   Pressure Cheat Sheet Some people love the feeling of being under pressure in sport, some really dislike it! Below is the Simply Perform cheat sheet to managing feelings of pressure. Imagery Regularly imagine yourself playing well under pressure. Use as many of your senses as possible to include things such as: • colour of opponents shirt, • noise in the room, • other players competing around you, • how your bat feels in your hand and so on This actually changes your brain in a way that makes it more likely that you will play well under pressure in real life! Focus When under pressure, there’s a tendency to focus on things that are not important! Keep this key word in mind: W.I.N It stands for What’s Important Now Imagine a pressure situation you’ve been in and complete the two columns below… Important Not Important
  • 2. ©  Andy  Blyth  2014   Simply  Perform   07590187014   Body Language Many people are aware that their body language shows others how they’re feeling. If you’re feeling tense and nervous whilst under pressure in table tennis and therefore rushing shots or making many mistakes – how do you think this makes your opponent feel? However, body language can also influence how we feel. Identify a player you know of (amateur or professional) who you think deals with pressure well. How do they look when pressure is on? How do you look when pressure is on? If there are differences between the two columns above, which ones can you start building into your game to help you manage pressure better? One more way… Sometimes athletes can think that if they learn all the “mental techniques” in the world, they’ll be immune to pressure. This is unrealistic. Name one athlete from any sport that you definitely know does not experience pressure in some form…. It’s difficult. Usain Bolt? Mario Balotelli? But then nobody can ever know exactly what he or she is thinking and feeling. After all, they probably have media personas to keep up! Perhaps a clue for a different way of dealing with pressure is not to do with confidence but rather courage. Rollo May, a psychotherapist, said “courage is not the removal of doubt and anxiety, but the attitude that we can move forward in spite of doubt and anxiety”. What does courage look like in your own game? When have you acted courageously? When have you not acted courageously? What would you have to do to make it more likely that you’ll act courageously more often?

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