CONSTRUCTION OF VIDEOGAMES FOR
MODELING LEARNING BY
ENGINEERING STUDENTS
Angel Pretelín-Ricárdez¹ ², Ana Isabel Sacrist...
AIM OF THIS WORK
2
PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK
3
Model-eliciting
activities (MEAs)
(Hamilton, Lesh & Lester, 2008)
Constructionism
(Papert & ...
METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS
4
PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
THE ACTIVITIES SEQUENCE
5
Initial questionnaire
•What step are needed to
build a model?
Activity 1
• Collaborative
...
STUDENTS’ CONSTRUCTIONS
6
PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
OBSERVATIONS
 Through the MEAs, students engaged in producing
a working model that was meaningful for them.
 The acti...
REFLECTING ON THE PROCESS
 Students gained a deeper understanding of all
elements involved in the modeling process
Man...
FUTURE WORK
 Experimentation with other models of physical
systems
 Using more robust videogame engines.
9
PME 38 /...
THANK YOU!
Contact:
Angel Pretelín-Ricárdez, apretelin@ipn.mx
Ana Isabel Sacristán, asacrist@cinvestav.mx
REFERENCES
 Hamilton, E., R. Lesh, Lester, F. (2008). Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) as a Bridge Between Engineering ...
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Construction of videogames for modeling learning by engineering students

Do you want to cite this work? ¿Quieres citar este trabajo? Pretelín-Ricárdez, A., & Sacristán A. I., (2014). Construction of videogames for modeling learning by engineering students. In Oesterle, S., Nicol, C., Liljedahl, P., & Allan, D. (Eds.) Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of PME 38 and PME-NA 36,Vol. 6, p. 199. Vancouver, Canada: PME: ISBN: 978-0-86491-360-9. ISSN:0771-100X You can find the full papers in: Puedes encontrar los trabajos en extenso en: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Angel_Pretelin_Ricardez https://ipn.academia.edu/AngelPretel%C3%ADnRic%C3%A1rdez
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Construction of videogames for modeling learning by engineering students

  • 1. CONSTRUCTION OF VIDEOGAMES FOR MODELING LEARNING BY ENGINEERING STUDENTS Angel Pretelín-Ricárdez¹ ², Ana Isabel Sacristán¹ ¹Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados (Cinvestav-IPN), Mexico ²Instituto Politécnico Nacional, UPIITA, Mexico
  • 2. AIM OF THIS WORK 2 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 3. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK 3 Model-eliciting activities (MEAs) (Hamilton, Lesh & Lester, 2008) Constructionism (Papert & Harel, 1991) Learning Microworlds (Hoyles & Noss, 1987) Building-videogames Based Learning (Kafay, 1995) PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 4. METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS 4 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 5. THE ACTIVITIES SEQUENCE 5 Initial questionnaire •What step are needed to build a model? Activity 1 • Collaborative • Developing the videogames idea Activity 2 • Individual • Building a model of water behaviour • Non traditional problem • Previous knowledge needed: Algebra, vector calculus, differential calculus, fluid mechanics Activity 3 • Collaborative • Simplifying the model • Building Simulation • Building videogames Post questionnaire • What step are needed to build a model? • Draw a block diagram of steps above PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 6. STUDENTS’ CONSTRUCTIONS 6 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 7. OBSERVATIONS  Through the MEAs, students engaged in producing a working model that was meaningful for them.  The activities also led them to reflect on what is involved in a modeling process 7 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 8. REFLECTING ON THE PROCESS  Students gained a deeper understanding of all elements involved in the modeling process Many students commented on how the teachings they had previously received had given them an incorrect conception of what is involved in a modeling process: they had a traditional view of a "problem statement" that requires a fixed, final answer. But now they understood a modeling process, as an iterative and improvable activity. 8 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 9. FUTURE WORK  Experimentation with other models of physical systems  Using more robust videogame engines. 9 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014
  • 10. THANK YOU! Contact: Angel Pretelín-Ricárdez, apretelin@ipn.mx Ana Isabel Sacristán, asacrist@cinvestav.mx
  • 11. REFERENCES  Hamilton, E., R. Lesh, Lester, F. (2008). Model-Eliciting Activities (MEAs) as a Bridge Between Engineering Education Research and Mathematics Education Research. Advances in Engineering Education. 1(2), 1-25.  Hoyles, C. & Noss, R. (1987). Synthesizing mathematical conceptions and their formalization through the construction of a Logo-base school mathematics curriculum. International Journal of Mathematics education in science and technology, 18(4), 581-595.  Kafai, Y. (1995). Minds in play. Computer game design as a context for children's learning. Hilsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Kafai, Y., & Resnick, M. (1996). Constructionism in practice: Designing, thinking, and learning in a digital world. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Kafai, Y. B., Franke, M., Ching, C., & Shih, J. (1998). Game design as an interactive learning environment fostering students’ and teachers’ mathematical inquiry. International Journal of Computers for Mathematical Learning, 3(2), 149-184.  Kafai, Y. B. (2006). Playing and making games for learning: Instructionist and constructionist perspectives for game studies. Games and Culture, 1(1), 36-40.  Lesh, R., Hoover, M., Hole, B., Kelly, A., Post, T., (2000). Principles for eveloping thought-revealing activities for students and teachers. In A. Kelly, R. Lesh (Eds.), Research design in mathematics and science education, (pp. 591-646). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Lesh, R., Doerr, H. M., (2003). Foundations of a models and modelling perspective on mathematics teaching, learning, and problem solving. In R. Lesh, H. M. Doerr (Eds.), Beyond constructivism. Models and modelling perspectives on mathematics problem solving, learning and teaching, (pp. 3-33). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Papert, S. & Harel, I. (1991). Situating constructionism. In S. Papert & I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism. N.J.: Ablex Publishing Corporation.  Yoyo Games. (2013). Game Maker Studio [Software para desarrollo de videojuegos]. Recuperado de http://www.yoyogames.com/gamemaker/download 11 PME 38 / PME-NA 36 Vancouver, Canada. Pretelín & Sacristán, 2014