©
 IMSA
 Amsterdam
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ...
©
 IMSA
 Amsterdam
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ...
©
 IMSA
 Amsterdam
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ...
©
 IMSA
 Amsterdam
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 ...
of 4

Narrative Living North Sea Initiative_D01

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narrative Living North Sea Initiative_D01

  • 1. ©  IMSA  Amsterdam                                                                                                                                    April  2015 1   The  Living  North  Sea  Initiative   A  catalyst  for  ecosystem  restoration  and  sustainable  use  of  the  North  Sea   The  North  Sea,  a  showcase  of  innovative  approaches   The  North  Sea  is  the  largest  nature  area  in  North-­‐Western  Europe  and  is  one  of  the  most  varied  and  productive   marine  ecosystems  in  the  world.  Until  the  early  20th  century,  the  North  Sea  was  a  very  different  ecosystem   from  what  it  is  now.  The  bed  of  the  Southern  North  Sea,  which  is  now  characterised  by  sand  and  mud,  was   largely  covered  with  boulders  and  oyster  beds,  creating  large  natural  reefs  and  fields  of  sea  grass.  Further   north,  kelp  forests  formed  the  basis  for  diverse  ecosystems,  making  effective  use  of  the  nutrient  rich  waters  of   the  North  Sea.  Marine  life  in  the  North  Sea  was  rich  and  abundant,  allowing  for  a  large  and  thriving  fishing   sector.       Close  to  200  million  people,  from  seven  different  countries,  benefit  from  their  North  Sea  coastlines.  Access  to   its  shores  provides  them  with  bountiful  food  resources,  a  transport  thoroughfare  for  trade  and  industry  and  a   vast  energy  reservoir.  As  the  North  Sea  ecosystem  has  been  intensively  and  unsustainably  used  for  more  than   a  century,  it  is  under  pressure  from  a  variety  of  sources.  As  a  result  of  seabed-­‐disturbing  activities,  over-­‐fishing,   pollution  and  eutrophication,  large  areas  of  the  reef-­‐dependent  habitats  have  almost  disappeared,  along  with   many  of  the  species  dependent  on  these  habitats.  In  the  coming  decades  the  intensity  of  offshore  activities  is   expected  to  grow  further  while  the  effects  of  climate  change  are  likely  to  reduce  the  resilience  of  the   ecosystem.
  • 2. ©  IMSA  Amsterdam                                                                                                                                    April  2015 2       The  North  Sea  is  a  major  asset  for  the  neighbouring  countries  and  the  transition  to  sustainable  use  of  marine   resources  provides  unique  opportunities  for  regional  collaboration:  the  North  Sea  could  become  a  showcase  of   sustainable  ‘blue  growth’  for  other  regions  around  the  world,  creating  worldwide  opportunities  for  innovative   businesses. 1  To  create  the  necessary  conditions  for  sustainable  ‘blue  growth’  strategies  that  support   sustainable  growth  in  the  marine  and  maritime  sectors  as  a  whole,  we  need  to  find  ways  in  which  economic   activities  and  natural  ecosystems  become  mutually  supportive.  With  one  of  the  major  economic  activities  in   the  North  Sea  -­‐  energy  production  -­‐  undergoing  a  major  shift  in  the  coming  decades,  we  are  presented  with  an   opportunity  to  develop  new  policy  and  business  models  that  will  create  room  for  both  North  Sea  users  and   marine  ecosystems.     Challenges  and  opportunities  in  decommissioning  of  oil  and  gas  structures     For  centuries,  man-­‐made  structures  have  -­‐  often  unintentionally  -­‐  provided  reef-­‐like  habitats  to  the  North  Sea   ecosystem.  Once  artificial  structures,  like  ship  wrecks,  coastal  defences,  oil  and  gas  installations  and  most   recently  a  rapidly  growing  number  of  offshore  wind  installations,  are  placed  on  the  seabed,  they  become  part   of  the  ecosystem.  Ship  wrecks  have  been  found  to  host  a  unique  diversity  of  species  that  are  increasingly   scarce  in  other  places  in  the  North  Sea  and  oil  and  gas  installations  are  home  to  hard  and  soft  corals,   anemones,  tubeworms,  mussels  and  oysters,  various  kinds  of  algae  and  fish.  All  these  structures  serve  as   shelters  for  commercial  and  non-­‐commercial  fish  and  as  feeding  grounds  for  marine  mammals.         According  to  current  regulations,  installations  that  have  been  placed  in  the  North  Sea  with  an  economic   purpose  must  be  fully  removed  when  they  no  longer  serve  that  purpose  or  another  ‘legitimate  purpose’.   OSPAR  98/3  dictates  that  all  installations  are  fully  removed  to  shore  to  make  sure  that  the  space  occupied  may   be  given  back  to  other  users  of  the  sea  and  the  seabed  may  be  restored  in  its  ‘original’  state.  As  a  result,  more   than  500  offshore  oil  and  gas  installations  will  have  to  be  removed  in  the  North  Sea  in  the  coming  decades,   when  oil  and  gas  production  comes  to  an  end.  The  same  applies  for  offshore  wind  installations  when  their   permits  expire.       The  Living  North  Sea  Initiative  for  a  rich  and  sustainably  used  North  Sea     The  Living  North  Sea  Initiative  (LiNSI)  is  a  North  Sea  wide,  science-­‐based,  multi-­‐stakeholder  programme  that   aims  to  explore  and  facilitate  implementation  of  new  opportunities  for  restoring  a  healthy  and  rich  North  Sea   ecosystem.  LiNSI  LiNSI  is  inspired  by  Rigs-­‐to-­‐Reef  and  ecosystem  restoration  programmes  elsewhere  in  the   world.  It  explores  whether  it  might  be  possible  to  reduce  decommissioning  costs,  whilst  protecting  the   ecosystems  that  have  developed  on  and  around  these  man-­‐made  structures,  and  then  to  use  part  of  these   cost-­‐savings  to  invest  in  active  ecosystem  protection  and  the  transition  to  sustainable  use  of  marine  resources.     The  mission  of  the  LiNSi  programme  is  to:   1. Catalyse  protection,  restoration  and  the  transition  to  sustainable  use  of  the  North  Sea   2. Allow  for  decommissioning  to  be  done  in  the  best  way  for  environment  and  safety     1  Blue  Growth  is  the  European  Commission’s  long  term  strategy  to  support  sustainable  growth  in  the  marine  and  maritime   sectors  as  a  whole  (http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/blue_growth/).
  • 3. ©  IMSA  Amsterdam                                                                                                                                    April  2015 3   3. Facilitate  collaboration  and  knowledge  sharing  between  stakeholders  across  the  North  Sea  to  develop   innovative  policies  and  business  models.     Box 1: The potential of Rigs-to-Reefs LiNSI asks whether removal of disused structures should necessarily be seen as the preferred option or if we might better serve the environment and the North Sea ecosystem by leaving part of the cleaned structures (jackets) offshore. Elsewhere in the world Rigs-to-Reefs are already a proven practise, among others in the Gulf of Mexico, California, Australia, Brunei, Malaysia and Gabon. If combined with proper fisheries management programmes, Rigs-to-Reefs can have a positive ecological impact as they: • reduce the environmental impact of decommissioning • provide habitat for ecosystems and species dependent on hard substrate • support a wide variety of species, including threatened, protected and commercially-valuable species • serve as a shelter, breeding and feeding grounds for marine mammals, fish, sharks and rays • enhance local biodiversity • could create hard physical boundaries for Marine Protected Areas • could result in improved fish stocks for fisheries • enable innovative reuse and multi-use concepts, e.g. for carbon capture & storage or aquaculture To guide decision-making on decommissioning or reefing of specific structures decision-making models and guidelines need to be developed together with experts and stakeholders.   Box 2: The potential of a North Sea Fund If a Rigs-to-Reefs approach would be allowed, governments and oil & gas companies might save several billions of euros. A significant part of the cost reservations made for decommissioning could be invested in a North Sea Fund, providing a funding mechanism for innovative approaches to ecosystem restoration & sustainable use. Imagine what we could do with that money, if we could use it as seed money to catalyse a large, revolving investment fund: • develop and invest in new business models for fishermen that guarantee sustainable catches (and restoration of fish stocks) in the long term; • restore kelp forests, oyster banks and other ‘hard substrate habitats’ that provide shelter for fish, take up excess nutrients, help clean the water and potentially offers opportunities for commercial use; • invest in efficient, multi-functional use of marine space, combining energy production with protein production or facilitating reuse of current infrastructure in order to reduce the need for new pipelines, cables and installations; • invest in coastal protection that is both effective in the wake of climate change and supports the development of rich coastal ecosystems; • invest in improved safety and reduced environmental impact from shipping activities; • invest in coastal recreational activities like sport fishing and diving reefs. A North Sea Fund could offer inspiring opportunities for sustainability initiatives in the North Sea, and
  • 4. ©  IMSA  Amsterdam                                                                                                                                    April  2015 4   stakeholders are invited to engage with LiNSI in order to shape the fund and bring in new ideas.   An  exciting  journey  to  build  momentum  for  change     LiNSI  is  a  multi-­‐stakeholder  programme  that  involves  organisations  from  across  North  Sea  territories.  The   programme  was  initiated  by  IUCN,  Shell  and  IMSA  Amsterdam  and  is  currently  sponsored  by  several  oil  and  gas   companies  and  by  IMSA.  A  number  of  NGOs  also  participate  in  the  project:  IUCN  International  and  North  Sea   Foundation  as  partners;  Scottish  Wildlife  Trust  and  WWF-­‐the  Netherlands  as  observers,  bringing  in  their  own   knowledge.  IMSA  Amsterdam  is  responsible  for  the  overall  programme  management.  Stakeholder  engagement   is  being  led  by  Forum  for  the  Future  in  the  UK  and  Ecologic  in  Germany.       Motivations of some participants ‘The Living North Sea initiatives provides companies with the opportunity to leave the North Sea in a better state than when we found it - to create a positive legacy.’ (Oil & Gas company) ‘We have forgotten about the richness of the North Sea, but we might be able to bring back its natural reefs and restore some of this richness with a little help.’ (NGO)     LiNSI  is  engaging  with  a  growing  group  of  stakeholders,  including  NGOs,  scientists,  oil  and  gas  industry,   offshore  industry,  (renewable)  energy,  fisheries,  aquaculture,  shipping,  tourism,  ports,  coastal  communities   and  governments.  Together  with  industry  experts  and  scientists  we  are  putting  together  a  knowledge  base  on   the  environmental,  health  and  safety  impacts  and  costs  of  different  decommissioning  options  for  the  North   Sea.  We  are  identifying  potential  implications  for  OSPAR  and  secondary  policies  of  member  states  and   international  regulators.  In  parallel,  we  are  developing  a  business  case  for  a  North  Sea  Fund  in  which  potential   decommissioning  cost  savings  could  serve  as  a  catalyst  for  ecosystem  restoration  and  sustainable  use.  This   fund  should  be  embedded  in  a  broader  market  development  strategy  stimulating  innovative,  profitable   economic  activities  and  supporting  ecological  recovery  of  the  North  Sea,  e.g.  sustainable  fisheries,  aquaculture   and  offshore  renewables.  Engaging  with  wide  groups  of  stakeholders  is  crucial  to  challenging  our  thinking   about  what  the  North  Sea  could  be  like  and  to  work  towards  innovative  ways  to  realise  this  vision  and  to  gain   momentum  for  change.     Want  to  know  more  or  join  in?     If  you  would  like  to  join  us  on  our  exploration  towards  a  healthy  and  living  North  Sea,  do  not  hesitate  to   contact  us.        Anne-­‐Mette  Jørgensen,  Programme  Manager     T:  +31  613196485,  M:  +31  634766441,  E:  anne-­‐mette.jorgensen@imsa.nl     Guus  van  de  Hoef,  Process  Manager   T:  +31  343451927,  M:  +31  622921149,  E:  guus.van.de.hoef@imsa.nl

Related Documents