1.
Name, email and phone of participants
Jason Kridner
jdk@ti.com and jkridner@gmail.com
586-764-1992
If I get any teach...
6.
Software required (Software, version, license,…)
The following software should be installed:
* BeagleBone drivers fro...
1. Name, email and phone of participants: Karthik CHIDAMBARANATHAN
(karthik.chidambaranathan@st.com) and Firat SEREFOGLU (...
Patrick Kane Bio
Patrick Kane is the director of the Cypress University Alliance Program (CUA) at Cypress Semiconductor
Co...
Cordially Invites You to Attend A
TM
PSoC 4Workshop
WHY:
Learn all about the latest Cypress PSoC4 technology. PSoC is a ...
1. Name, email and phone of participants
a. Matt Wood
Senior Field Applications Engineer
matt.wood@atmel.com
781-915-7217
...
1. Name, email and phone of participants: Derrick Klotz (derrick.klotz@freescale.com), 647-988044
2. Workshop Name: Hands-...
1. Name, email and phone of participants: Bob Boys, bob.boys@arm.com,
+1 (650) 475-6295
2. Workshop Name 1): Real Time Ope...
1. Name, email and phone of participants
Joe Hale
joe.hale@nxp.com
415 894-0639
2. Workshop Name
LPCXpresso: Debugging wit...
1. Name, email and phone of participants: Joe Bungo, joe.bungo@arm.com, 512-293-7324
2. Workshop Name: “MBED - A platform ...
4th ARM Developer Day Presenters info
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4th ARM Developer Day Presenters info

4th ARM Developer Day
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - 4th ARM Developer Day Presenters info

  • 1. 1. Name, email and phone of participants Jason Kridner jdk@ti.com and jkridner@gmail.com 586-764-1992 If I get any teaching assistants, I will let you know. 2. Workshop Name Getting started with physical computing using JavaScript, Linux and BeagleBone Black 3. Presenter’s name and small bio Slightly updated from http://www.amazon.com/Jason-Kridner/e/B00CPRC216: Jason Kridner is the Software Community Development Manager for Sitara™ ARM® processors at Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI). During his over 20-year tenure with TI, he has become an active leader in TI's open source initiative and played an integral role in creating open-source development tools such as BeagleBoard, BeagleBoard-xMBeagleBone and now BeagleBone Black, a credit-card-sized Linux computer platform based on TI's 1GHz Sitara™ AM335x ARM® Cortex™-A8 processor that runs Android 4.0 and Ubuntu software. Inspired by the needs of Linux developers, Kridner created the idea of pioneering a powerful, innovative and open community where developers and hobbyists could share solutions, showcase new projects, ask questions and offer feedback. Launched in 2008, BeagleBoard.org averages more than 50,000 hits per week and is now one of the most active open-source hardware communities in the industry. As a high-profile industry expert, Kridner has engaged audiences at a variety of industry and developer shows including Maker Faire, OSCON, CES, Design, Android Builders Summit, Linux Collaboration Summit and the Embedded Linux Conference. In his free time, Kridner uses BeagleBone to explore his creativity, including creating the BeagleBone Mustache Cam, which uses a webcam and computer vision to detect faces and superimpose fancy mustaches. 4. Workshop Abstract The workshop will introduce using BeagleBone Black as a physical computing device starting with highlevel languages, namely JavaScript, to utilize interfaces provided by Linux. Attendees will gain familiarity with the provided tools to explore various digital and analog interfaces provided by the board to perform basic electronics tasks. Information introducing community resources to further explore the hardware capabilities, including the real-time microcontrollers, will be provided encouraging use of additional interfaces and external components. Compilation of C/C++ applications will be completed and resources will be discussed in the case customization of the kernel is desired to interface new hardware. The concept of "device tree" will also be introduced as a mechanism to configure interfaces without needing to recompile the kernel. 5. Yes. Table setup for demos Yes( ) No( )
  • 2. 6. Software required (Software, version, license,…) The following software should be installed: * BeagleBone drivers from: http://beagleboard.org/Getting+Started#step2 * PuTTy (if Windows machines) from: http://the.earth.li/~sgtatham/putty/latest/x86/putty.exe * Latest Google Chrome browser 7. Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …) Computer, monitor, keyboard, mouse, available USB 2.0 host port with at least 500mA supply 8. Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? 20 9. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2) 2 10. Any time constraints? At least 45 minutes is rather helpful. I believe you said 1-1/2 hours for each workshop and I will run the same workshop twice. 11. Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….) Cathy may have some give-away hardware. I can round up at least one board to give-away. 12. Anything else? Keynote title and abstract: The Next Economy is Hardware Included The new product development landscape includes low-cost, low-power ARM development boards, such as BeagleBone Black, with high-level operating systems that provide Internet connectivity via hundreds of always simpler programming paradigms, extensive interfaces with tutorials to connect to virtually any sensor or control element and a true open hardware nature that enables full customization without any barriers to reach production. These tools that lower the time and cost of bringing a product to market are now coupled with social financing options, such as Kickstarter, opening up entrepreneurial opportunities that haven't been available since the dawn of the dotcom boom. While the ecosystem of mobile phones and mobile apps has provided success for some, the multi-function nature of phones prevents an appliance-like experience and sets a $0.99 expectation that caps opportunities of many by creating a "hit single" environment where a few make a lot of money and most make nothing at all. By creating an appliance, rather than an app, the value proposition of your concept can be conveyed much more simply and the experience of technology can be made seamless within our society.
  • 3. 1. Name, email and phone of participants: Karthik CHIDAMBARANATHAN (karthik.chidambaranathan@st.com) and Firat SEREFOGLU (firat.serefoglu@st.com) 2. Workshop Name: STM32F429 Discovery Kit Graphics Hands-On Workshop 3. Presenter’s name and small bio: Karthik CHIDAMBARANATHAN and Firat SEREFOGLU (firat.serefoglu@st.com) 4. Workshop Abstract: This hands-on seminar will examine the challenges faced by embedded designers when developing applications requiring high performance and sophisticated user interfaces What you will learn: • How to use the MicroXplorer configuration to select the best MCU and quickly start a new project • How to use the Chrom-ART graphics accelerator for faster smoother graphics • How to use the STemWin graphics library for easiest graphics UI creation **Attendees will receive a STM32F429 Discovery Kit which will be used in the hands-on sessions. 5. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): 1 (with part 1 and part 2 in two different sessions
  • 4. Patrick Kane Bio Patrick Kane is the director of the Cypress University Alliance Program (CUA) at Cypress Semiconductor Corporation and an affiliate professor in electrical and computer engineering at the University of New Hampshire, Durham. The Cypress University Alliance Program is dedicated to partnering with academia to ensure that professors and students have access to the latest Cypress PSoCTM technology for use in education and research. Patrick joined the Cypress in July 2006. Before joining Cypress, Patrick spent 13 ½ years at Xilinx in a variety of technical and marketing roles including Applications Engineering, Aerospace and Defense, Automotive, Technical Training, and managing the Xilinx University Program (XUP). Prior to Xilinx, Patrick spent a number of years at both Advanced Micro Devices and Lattice Semiconductor Inc. He holds BSEE and MBA degrees and has authored numerous articles and conference papers. Patrick is currently pursuing the doctorate in educational technology. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. Name, email and phone of participants: Patrick Kane, pkx@cypress.com, 408 550-4508 Workshop Name - Introduction to PSoC 4 Presenter’s name and small bio: Patrick Kane (BIO attached) Workshop Abstract - Is the attached enough or do you need more detail? Table setup for demos Yes(X) No( ) Software required (Software, version, license,…)PSoC Creator latest version http://www.cypress.com/psoccreator/ Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …)Windows based, WIN8.1 USB drivers ARE NOT supported Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? 25 each workshop Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): 2 Any time constraints?: No Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….) They keep the kits! Anything else? The Cypress University Alliance
  • 5. Cordially Invites You to Attend A TM PSoC 4Workshop WHY: Learn all about the latest Cypress PSoC4 technology. PSoC is a family of mixedsignal (analog, digital, and embedded MCU), programmable devices. PSoCis truly the world’s first Programmable System-On-Chip (more info @ www.cypress.com ) Leave with the knowledge of PSoC Architecture and PSoC Creator Software and learn how you can get a free Development Kit. WHO SHOULD ATTEND? Facultyand Students involved in senior project, digital, analog, and embedded classes and design; as well as topics as diverse as robotics, mechatronics, industrial controls, automotive, and aeronautics. WHEN: Friday, January31, 2013,XX:XXAM/PM to XX:XXAM/PM WHERE: AGENDA: PSoC architecture overview, softwareand dev kit demos, hands-on labs REGISTRATION: More information is available about PSoC 4 at: www.cypress.com/PSoC4
  • 6. 1. Name, email and phone of participants a. Matt Wood Senior Field Applications Engineer matt.wood@atmel.com 781-915-7217 2. Workshop Name: a. " Microcontroller design with Atmel Studio 6 and the SAMD20 Cortex M0+ Development board." 3. Presenter’s name and small bio a. Matt Wood is a Senior Field Applications Engineer with Atmel, based in Andover, MA. In his role, Matt supports customers in the Northeast for all Atmel products, with a focus on microcontroller and microprocessor products. In 2011, Matt presented at the 2ndAnnul ARM Developer Day. 4. Workshop Abstract : a. In this workshop, students will learn an overview of Atmel’s integrated design environment known at Atmel Studio 6. This toolset supports all of Atmel’s 8-bit and 32bit microcontroller products. Then students will learn the use of one of Atmel’s evaluation kits, the SAMD20 Explained Pro Kit, which utilizes an ARM Cortex M0+ 5. Table setup for demos Yes(X ) No( ) 6. Software required (Software, version, license,…) a. Atmel Studio 6.1 SP2, which is downloaded from the Atmel website should be preinstalled on all Lab computers or participant’s laptops. 7. Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …): a. Lab computers, micro USB cable for each student/station 8. Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? a. 20 in each session, total of 40 (two 1.5 hour sessions) 9. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): a. 2 10. Any time constraints?: a. No 11. Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….) a. No, but students can keep the evaluation board 12. Anything else? a. Is there a schedule available? Does anything need to be prepared for the morning (i.e a brief 5 min intro presentation like last time)?
  • 7. 1. Name, email and phone of participants: Derrick Klotz (derrick.klotz@freescale.com), 647-988044 2. Workshop Name: Hands-on Project Development with the Freescale Freedom Development Platform 3. Presenter’s name and small bio: Derrick is a Regional FAE based in Toronto, Canada and has more than 35 years of experience with electronic control systems. During his 25-year career at Motorola and Freescale, he has developed considerable practical experience using single-chip microcontrollers of all sizes. 4. Workshop Abstract: Using Freescale’s Processor Expert Software and Keil’s Microcontroller Development Kit (MDK) for ARM, students will get the opportunity to experience rapid project development for the Cortex-M0+ Kinetis L family of microcontrollers. The resulting software will be downloaded and executed on a low cost Freescale Freedom Development Platform (FRDMKL25Z). 5. Table setup for demos Yes( ) No( ) Probably (x) 6. Software required (Software, version, license,…): Each computer will need access to Keil’s MDK μVision software. It is my understanding that this is already installed on the school’s computers – is that correct? We will need to use μVision version 4.73 or higher (I intend to use version 5.1) – which version is installed in the school? 7. Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …): PCs. To use these boards during the hands-on session will require the installation of the following software and a USB mini-B cable connection with each student computer – do you have these? 8. Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? For each session I will have 20 FRDMKL25Z Freescale Freedom Development Platform boards available to be given to students 9. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): 2 10. Any time constraints?: No 11. Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….):20 boards per workshop. 12. Anything else?:I know how to get to the school, but exactly where will we be presenting, etc.?
  • 8. 1. Name, email and phone of participants: Bob Boys, bob.boys@arm.com, +1 (650) 475-6295 2. Workshop Name 1): Real Time Operating System: Keil RTX 3. Workshop Name 2): CAN: Controller Area Network 4. Presenter’s name and small bio:Bob Boys works from ARM and is based in California. He works for the ARM development tools division directly for Keil and DS-5. He graduated from Wilfrid Laurier University, attended U of Waterloo and has a MIS from the University of Toronto: all in Canada He has 20 years of experience in the embedded computing industry and is the author of numerous articles, white papers and technical training courses. 5. Workshop Abstract 1):Using a STMicroelectronics ARM Cortex-M4 you will construct the RTOS from the basics. This will illustrate how RTX works and how easy it is to configure. We will examine and adjust the various RTOS timings using the ARM Serial Wire Viewer. You will clearly see when task switching happens and how long a task stays active. 6. Workshop Abstract 2) :CAN is everywhere – not just in automotive. CAN is a two-wire easy-to-configure network. Adding nodes is as easy as plugging them in. In this hands-on lab you will write a small program for a small CAN network using an NXP or ST processor and pass and receive messages. If you are looking for a easy to use network that is fast to create: CAN is a good choice. 7. Table setup for demos Yes(x) (same one as above) No( ) 8. Software required (Software, version, license,…): Keil MDK 4.73 9. Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …): RTX: STM32F4 Discovery board, USB cable (not provided with board) CAN: Keil MCB1700 or MCBSTM32E (provided by ARM), ULINK2 or ULINKpro. 10. Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? 25 11. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): 2 different workshops 12. Any time constraints?: no – whatever is scheduled 13. Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….): RTX – students keep the Discovery boards. CAN – can’t keep boards. 14. Anything else?
  • 9. 1. Name, email and phone of participants Joe Hale joe.hale@nxp.com 415 894-0639 2. Workshop Name LPCXpresso: Debugging with NXP's Cortex-M dev boards. 3. Presenter’s name and small bio Joe Hale Senior Software Engineer - working on the NXP development tool suite LPCXpresso. 4. Workshop Abstract A hands-on workshop to demonstrate debugging of a Cortex-M0+ using tools from NXP. Participants will get an application up and running on an LPCXpresso development board. We will show you some of the tools within the LPCXpresso IDE that can help you debug your code, including instruction trace via the MTB. All participants will receive a free dev board from NXP. 5. Table setup for demos Yes( ) No( ) No 6. Software required (Software, version, license,…) Spoken with lab managers already (installing LPCXpresso free edition) 7. Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …): PCs and USB cables for the boards Classroom with 16 computers. 8. Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? 32 per session (two seats per computer) = 64 total. 9. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): 2 10. Any time constraints?: No 11. Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….) nope… just the boards they use in the workshop 12. Anything else? Joe Hale lives locally and could pop round to check the hardware and software setup before the day.
  • 10. 1. Name, email and phone of participants: Joe Bungo, joe.bungo@arm.com, 512-293-7324 2. Workshop Name: “MBED - A platform for rapid prototyping” 3. Presenter’s name and small bio: Joe Bungo holds a B.A. in Computer Science from the University of Texas at Austin. He joined ARM's Applications Engineering group in 2002, initially providing consultation, support, and training for ARM commercial partner software development and tools. In 2005, he moved into ARM's University Program as a Senior Applications Engineer, and is now University Program Manager for the Americas and Europe. Here, he encourages and supports the use of ARM in universities in myriad ways, including curriculum development and migration, ARM partnership program development, technical guest lectures, hands-on workshops, faculty training, technical support, and facilitation of research ties. 4. Workshop Abstract: With the falling costs and increasing complexities of processors, microcontrollers are becoming cheaper, more powerful and interactive. They are now truly solutions looking for problems, where anyone could conceive a microcontroller application. The problem until now has been turning the idea into a prototype quickly and experimenting with the technology. ARM has changed this with MBED, a rapid prototyping platform designed to simplify getting started with microcontrollers. Using a web based compiler and a very simple drag-and-drop interface, applications are developed without the need for expensive tools, and a new user can write and execute a "hello world" program in about sixty seconds. 5. Table setup for demos Yes(x) No( ) 6. Software required (Software, version, license,…): any kind of terminal program like Hyperterminal or Putty 7. Hardware required (computer, monitors, connectors, adapters, memory cards …): computers and monitors (I think where I present the students will require a laptop?), and definitely wifi (both for the students and myself) 8. Number of boards that will be available for the workshop? 10-12 per workshop (so students work in teams), unless there is obvious more demand during registration. I do not plan for the students to walk away with the boards. 9. Number of Workshops to teach (max 2): 2 of the same session 10. Any time constraints?: No 11. Prizes for students (workshop attendees, raffles, door prizes,….): I can/bring a variety of dev boards if RIT can provide the raffle logistics 12. Anything else?