POL 140
Fall 2014
 Written over 200 years
ago in Philadelphia
 Oldest written
constitution in the
modern world
 Many governments
us...
Virginia House of Burgesses, 1619
Sugar Act (1764)
Stamp Act (1765)
Declaratory Act (1766)
Townshend Acts (1767)
Charles Townshend,
Chancellor of the Exchequer
Tea Act (1773)
Boston Tea Party
 “Virtual Representation”
First Continental Congress
Franklin Livingston Adams
Sherman Jefferson
The Social Contract
“Consent of
the Governed”
Locke
 States had one vote
 Changing laws required
nine of thirteen state
legislatures to agree
 Fundamental changes
had...
 No power to draft
soldiers or pay for
military
 No power to regulate
commerce
 No power to tax
Daniel Shays
 55 men from 12 states
 Colonial elite - Had public service background
 Service in Continental Congress
 Fought in ...
Madison Franklin Sherman Paterson
GEORGE WASHINGTON JAMES MADISON
 States received one vote
 Did NOT record votes
 Proceedings were secret
 Large States and Small States
 North and South
 States and Federal Government
 Strengthened power of
national government
 Bicameral (two house)
national legislature
 Members of lower
chamber apportioned
by population
 Gave legislature ...
 Unicameral
(one house) legislature
 Equal representation
regardless of
population
William Paterson
 Bicameral (two house)
legislature
 Lower chamber
(House) based on
population
 Upper chamber
(Senate) based on
e...
 How should slaves be counted in
allocating congressional representation?
 Decision: Three-Fifths Compromise
 “Enumerated” Powers
 Those powers “herein granted”
 Included:
 Power to raise an army
 Power to raise taxes
 P...
JAMES MADISON PATRICK HENRY
 Responds to Anti-Federalist critiques
 Danger lay in factions
 What is a faction?
 A group of citizens sharing an ...
REMOVING CAUSES
 Destroy Liberty
 Same Opinion
CONTROLLING EFFECTS
 Representative
Government
 Responding to Anti-Federalist thought that
Constitution will bring tyranny
 Deals with separation of powers through
...
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
Politics of the American Founding
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Politics of the American Founding

Politics of the American Founding
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Politics of the American Founding

  • 1. POL 140 Fall 2014
  • 2.  Written over 200 years ago in Philadelphia  Oldest written constitution in the modern world  Many governments used it as a model for their political system
  • 3. Virginia House of Burgesses, 1619
  • 4. Sugar Act (1764) Stamp Act (1765)
  • 5. Declaratory Act (1766) Townshend Acts (1767) Charles Townshend, Chancellor of the Exchequer
  • 6. Tea Act (1773) Boston Tea Party
  • 7.  “Virtual Representation” First Continental Congress
  • 8. Franklin Livingston Adams Sherman Jefferson
  • 9. The Social Contract “Consent of the Governed” Locke
  • 10.  States had one vote  Changing laws required nine of thirteen state legislatures to agree  Fundamental changes had to be unanimous
  • 11.  No power to draft soldiers or pay for military  No power to regulate commerce  No power to tax
  • 12. Daniel Shays
  • 13.  55 men from 12 states  Colonial elite - Had public service background  Service in Continental Congress  Fought in Revolutionary War  Been a state governor or served as state legislator
  • 14. Madison Franklin Sherman Paterson
  • 15. GEORGE WASHINGTON JAMES MADISON
  • 16.  States received one vote  Did NOT record votes  Proceedings were secret
  • 17.  Large States and Small States  North and South  States and Federal Government
  • 18.  Strengthened power of national government
  • 19.  Bicameral (two house) national legislature  Members of lower chamber apportioned by population  Gave legislature much broader authority than under Articles James Madison
  • 20.  Unicameral (one house) legislature  Equal representation regardless of population William Paterson
  • 21.  Bicameral (two house) legislature  Lower chamber (House) based on population  Upper chamber (Senate) based on equality Roger Sherman
  • 22.  How should slaves be counted in allocating congressional representation?  Decision: Three-Fifths Compromise
  • 23.  “Enumerated” Powers  Those powers “herein granted”  Included:  Power to raise an army  Power to raise taxes  Provide for general welfare of nation
  • 24. JAMES MADISON PATRICK HENRY
  • 25.  Responds to Anti-Federalist critiques  Danger lay in factions  What is a faction?  A group of citizens sharing an interest different from interests of another group or nation
  • 26. REMOVING CAUSES  Destroy Liberty  Same Opinion CONTROLLING EFFECTS  Representative Government
  • 27.  Responding to Anti-Federalist thought that Constitution will bring tyranny  Deals with separation of powers through checks and balances  “Ambition must be made to counteract ambition”