By: Benedict Gombocz
 Government ( ): Parliamentary republic and multi-party democracy President ( ): Shi...
 Kadima Likud Yisrael Beiteinu Shas Labor United Torah Judaism Independence National Union Hada...
 1949: Mapai 1951: Mapai 1955: Mapai 1959: Mapai 1961: Mapai 1965: Alignment 1969: Alignment 1973:...
 1992: Labor Party 1996: Labor Party 1999: One Israel 2003: Likud 2006: Kadima 2009: Likud
 Centrist and liberal party Founded on 24 November 2005 by moderates from Likud largely to endorse the issue o...
 Major center-right party Founded in 1973 by Menachem Begin in an alliance with both right-wing and and libera...
 Nationalist party founded in 1999 Describes itself as “a national movement with the clear vision to follow...
 Ultra-orthodox religious party Founded in 1984 under the leadership of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, an ex Israeli Seph...
 Social-democratic and labour Zionist party Founded in 1968 by merger of Mapai, Ahdut HaAvoda and Rafi O...
 Alliance of Degel HaTorah and Agudat Israel, two small Israeli Haredi (Ultra-Orthodox) parties represented in the Knes...
 Center-zionist party Founded on 17 January 2011 by Defense Minister and former Prime Minister Ehud Barak a...
 Alliance of nationalist parties Founded in 1999 Consisted of four parties in 2009 elections: Moledat, H...
 Jewish and Arab socialist front of organizations that runs for the Knesset Founded in 1977 Currently has f...
 Israeli Arab and Islamist Party representing and supported by Israeli Arabs; not related to the original United Ara...
 Israeli-Arab and anti-Zionist party Founded in the mid 1990s Ran in 1996 elections under the name Arab Union, but gai...
 Right-wing national religious Zionist party Founded in November 2008 by a merger of National Religious Party, Mo...
 Left-wing, Zionist, Green , social democratic party Founded in 1992; previously known as Meretz, then Yach...
 Arab nationalist, democratic socialist, anti-Zionist party; sometimes referred to as the “National Democratic Al...
 Ninth and current President of Israel Born on 2 August 1923 in Wiszniew, Poland (now Vishneva, Belarus) ...
 Current Prime Minister of Israel; also served as Prime Minister between 1996 and 1999 Born on 21 October 1...
 Current Knesset speaker Born on 9 September 1939 in Jerusalem Ran in the election for President in 2007 ...
 Current President of the Supreme Court of Israel Born on 28 February 1942 in Tel Aviv Was appointed to be ...
 Kadima: 22.47% Likud: 21.61% Yisrael Beiteinu: 11.70% Labor Party: 9.93% Shas: 8.49% United Torah Judai...
Politics of Israel
Politics of Israel
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Politics of Israel

The Government and Politics of Israel
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: News & Politics      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Politics of Israel

  • 1. By: Benedict Gombocz
  • 2.  Government ( ): Parliamentary republic and multi-party democracy President ( ): Shimon Peres Prime Minister ( ): Benjamin Netanyahu Knesset Speaker: Reuven Rivlin Supreme Court President: Dorit Beinisch
  • 3.  Kadima Likud Yisrael Beiteinu Shas Labor United Torah Judaism Independence National Union Hadash United Arab List-Ta‟al The Jewish Home New Movement-Meretz Balad
  • 4.  1949: Mapai 1951: Mapai 1955: Mapai 1959: Mapai 1961: Mapai 1965: Alignment 1969: Alignment 1973: Alignment 1977: Likud 1981: Likud 1984: Alignment 1988: Likud
  • 5.  1992: Labor Party 1996: Labor Party 1999: One Israel 2003: Likud 2006: Kadima 2009: Likud
  • 6.  Centrist and liberal party Founded on 24 November 2005 by moderates from Likud largely to endorse the issue of Ariel Sharon‟s unilateral disagreement party Became the largest party represented in the Knesset after 2006 elections with Ehud Olmert as party chairman following Sharon‟s stroke and won 29 out of 120 total seats Won most seats in 2009 elections under Tzipi Livni‟s leadership, but became an opposition party for the first time after Likud-led government was created
  • 7.  Major center-right party Founded in 1973 by Menachem Begin in an alliance with both right-wing and and liberal parties Its victory in 1977 elections was a big turning point in Israel‟s political history; was the first time the left lost power Was the ruling party for most of the 1980s, but lost the Knesset elections in 1992 Saw a major split in 2005 after a convincing win in 2003 elections, during which its leader Ariel Sharon abanonded the party to create the Karima Party
  • 8.  Nationalist party founded in 1999 Describes itself as “a national movement with the clear vision to follow in the brave path of Zev Jabotinsky”, the founder of Revisionist Zionism Traditionally represents immigrants from the former Soviet Union Takes a hard line toward the peace process and Israeli Arabs with its 2009 election slogan “No loyalty, no citizenship” Won 15 seats in 2009 elections, its most to date; is third largest Knesset represented party
  • 9.  Ultra-orthodox religious party Founded in 1984 under the leadership of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef, an ex Israeli Sephardi chief rabbi Primarily represents the interests of religiously observant Sephardic and Mizrahi Jews Currently the fourth largest Knesset represented party Has joined coalition governments with Labor and Likud since 1984 ; holds four cabinet posts in Benjamin Netanyahu‟s coalition government
  • 10.  Social-democratic and labour Zionist party Founded in 1968 by merger of Mapai, Ahdut HaAvoda and Rafi Observer member of both Socialist International and Party of European Socialists All Israeli Prime Ministers were associated with the Labor movement until 1977 Split in the party in 2011 resulted in election of Shelly Yachimovich as party leader
  • 11.  Alliance of Degel HaTorah and Agudat Israel, two small Israeli Haredi (Ultra-Orthodox) parties represented in the Knesset Founded in 1992 Joined Ariel Sharon‟s coalition in 2004 and split its two constituent factors of Degel HaTorah and Agudat Israel Degel HaTorah and Agudat Israel revived their alliance under the banner of United Torah Judaism to not waste votes and get maximum representation in the 17th Knesset; they united again for the 18th Knesset elections in 2009 and won give mandates, which lost them one seat
  • 12.  Center-zionist party Founded on 17 January 2011 by Defense Minister and former Prime Minister Ehud Barak after he and four other Labour Party MKs declared their secession from the caucus In the words of the announcement, it aims to be “centrist, Zionist, and democratic” and to form itself as a separate party
  • 13.  Alliance of nationalist parties Founded in 1999 Consisted of four parties in 2009 elections: Moledat, Hatikva, Eretz Yisrael Shelanu, and Tkuma Brought into the National Unity Government after Ariel Sharon won the 2001 Prime Ministerial elections Was opposed to the withdrawal from the Gaza Strip
  • 14.  Jewish and Arab socialist front of organizations that runs for the Knesset Founded in 1977 Currently has four members in the 120-seat Knesset Won five seats in its first electoral test but was reduced to four seats in elections of 1981 Kept all four of its seats in 1984 elections Promotes evacuation of all Israeli settlements, a complete withdrawal of all territories captured in Six-Day War, and establishment of a Palestinian state in those territories
  • 15.  Israeli Arab and Islamist Party representing and supported by Israeli Arabs; not related to the original United Arab List from the late 1970s and early 1980s Founded in 1996 and was joined in an electoral alliance by the Arab Democratic Party (which held two seats in the outgoing parliament elected in 1992 legislative election) and the southern faction of the Islamist Movement Originally went under the title of Mada-Ra’am, with Mada as the acronym and common name for the Arab Democratic Party Entered an alliance with Ahmad Tibi‟s Ta‟al party in 2006 elections; the alliance received four seats, three of which were taken by the United Arab List Endorses creating a Palestinian State in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, with East Jerusalem as a capital; and equal rights for Israel‟s Arab minority
  • 16.  Israeli-Arab and anti-Zionist party Founded in the mid 1990s Ran in 1996 elections under the name Arab Union, but gained only 2,087 votes (0.1%) Ran on the Balad list in 1999 elections in which it received a seat and broke away from Balad on 21 December Ran on a joint list with Hadash in 2003 elections Abandoned the alliance with Hadash on 7 February 2006 and ran on a joint list with United Arab Front in 2006 elections; ran as Ra‟am-Ta‟al (Ra‟am is the Hebrew acronym for the UAL)
  • 17.  Right-wing national religious Zionist party Founded in November 2008 by a merger of National Religious Party, Moledat and Tkuma Was originally without a name; five names were proposed: HaBayit HaYehudi (“Jewish Home”), Shorashim (“Roots”), Atzma’ut (“Independence”), Shalem (Whole), and Amihai (“My Nation Lives”) “Jewish Home” was chosen in an on-line ballot Five of the top six slots went to former NRP members when Jewish Home announced its candidate list for the upcoming elections Won three seats in 2009 legislative election
  • 18.  Left-wing, Zionist, Green , social democratic party Founded in 1992; previously known as Meretz, then Yachad, and then Meretz- Yachad Emphasizes peace with the Palestinians, human rights (particularly for ethnic and sexual minorities), religious freedom and environmentalism Was formed by an alliance of three left-wing parties: Ratz, Mapam and Shinui
  • 19.  Arab nationalist, democratic socialist, anti-Zionist party; sometimes referred to as the “National Democratic Alliance” Founded in 1995 Its stated purpose is the „struggle to transform the State of Israel into a democracy for all its citizens, irrespective of national or ethnic identity‟ Opposed to the idea of Israel as a solely Jewish state and favors its recasting as a binational state Also advocates that Israel grant recognition to the Palestinian Arabs as a national minority Has objected to all proposed state budgets on the grounds that they have discriminated against the Arab minority
  • 20.  Ninth and current President of Israel Born on 2 August 1923 in Wiszniew, Poland (now Vishneva, Belarus) Previously served twice as the eighth Prime Minister of Israel and once as Interim Prime Minister; has been a member of 12 total cabinets in a political career spanning more than 66 years Was elected to the Knesset in November 1959 and, excluding a three-month-long hiatus early in 2006, continued to serve in 2007, when he became President Is the world‟s oldest de jure head of state at 88 years old
  • 21.  Current Prime Minister of Israel; also served as Prime Minister between 1996 and 1999 Born on 21 October 1949 in Tel Aviv; is the first Israeli prime minister born after the state‟s establishment Also serves as Chairman of Likud; Knesset member; Health Minister of Israel; Pensioner Affairs Minister of Israel; Economic Strategy Minister of Israel Received worldwide attention when French President Nicolas Sarkozy called him “a liar” at the 2011 G-20 summit in Cannes
  • 22.  Current Knesset speaker Born on 9 September 1939 in Jerusalem Ran in the election for President in 2007 Withdrew after the first round of voting when it was clear that Shimon Peres would inevitably win in a run-off Served in the 12th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 17th, and 18th Knessets
  • 23.  Current President of the Supreme Court of Israel Born on 28 February 1942 in Tel Aviv Was appointed to be President of the Supreme Court of Israel on 14 September 2006 following Aharon Barak‟s retirement Is the first woman to be President of the Supreme Court
  • 24.  Kadima: 22.47% Likud: 21.61% Yisrael Beiteinu: 11.70% Labor Party: 9.93% Shas: 8.49% United Torah Judaism: 4.39% United Arab List-Ta‟al: 3.38% National Union: 3.34% Hadash: 3.32% New Movement-Meretz: 2.95% The Jewish Home: 2.87% Balad: 2.48%

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