Si Wa Wata Wa, Zuni ca 1903
The Library of Congress Photographer, Edward S. Curtis
Presented by Brenda Music:Amazing Gra...
Chief Joseph, Nez Percé ca 1903
“All men were made brothers. The earth is the mother of all people, and all people
shoul...
White Shield, Arikara ca. 1908
White deerskin dance costume, Hupa ca 1923
Crazyhorse, Lakota
1840–September 5, 1877
was a Native American war leader of
the Oglala Lakota.
He took up arms again...
Yellow Kidney, Piegan ca 1910
Many Goat’s son, Navajo ca 1904
Sitting Bull
1831 – December 15, 1890, was
a Hunkpapa Lakota holy man who led his
people as a tribal chief during years...
Weasel Tail, Piegan ca 1900
An Acoma woman, Acoma ca 1905
Wooden Leg was born, in 1858,
in the region of the Black Hills, near the Cheyenne river.
He was son of Many Bullet Wound...
Running Rabbit ca 1900
Nez Percé Man, Nez Percé ca 1910
WHITE EAGLE (ca. 1840-1914)
White Eagle was the hereditary chief of the Ponca
Indians. In 1879, when Standing Bear and o...
Head Carry ca 1900
Lucille, Dakota
A Tluwulahu mask, Tsawatenok ca 1914
Bearbull illustrating an ancient
Blackfoot method of arranging the hair
“What is life? It is a flash of a firefly in
th...
Two Whistles, Apsaroke ca 1908
Black Elk, Oglala Lakota (Sioux)
“I was standing on the highest mountain of
them all, and round about beneath me was
th...
Wishham bride, Tlakluit ca 1910
Tah It Way with peace pipe on right ca 1905
Iron Breast, Piegan ca 1900
Bull Chief Apsaroke, Crow ca 1908
Wishham young woman, Tlakluit ca 1910
Pah Toi, White Clay, Taos, New Mexico ca 1905
Geronimo
"the one who yawns";
June 1829 – February 17, 1909)
was a prominent leader of the
Bedonkohe Apache who fought...
We-Ton ca 1900
Ben Long Ear ca
1905
Maskette, Nunivak ca 1929
Young Hairy Wolf, Apsaroke ca 1905
Wisham girl ca 1910
Black Hair ca 1905
Ten Bears
(1792-1872)
Comanche name Paruasemena
Principal chief of northern Yamparika division of Comanche
signed Trea...
One Blue Bead, Crow ca 1908
Three Horses ca 1905
Lies Sideway, Crow ca 1908
Mosa Mojave ca
1903
A Kato woman California ca
1924
A Mojave man wearing a robe of rabbit skin ca
1907
Black Elk Oglala Lakota (Sioux)
“The first peace, which is the most important,
is that which comes within the souls of p...
a Hopi Girl ca
1905
A Taos girl ca
1905
A young Yakima man shell disk earrings ca 1910
Big Head ca
1905
Chief Seattle, Cherokee
“Teach your children what we have taught our
children, that the Earth is our mother.
Whatever b...
Bird Rattle, Piegan ca 1910
Cheyenne ca 1910
Morning Eagle, Piegan ca 1910
Red Jacket
(known as Otetiani in his youth
and Sagoyewatha (Keeper Awake) Sa-go-ye-wa-
tha because of his oratorical sk...
Navajo Medicine Man ca 1904
Nesjaja, Hatalimedicine man, Navajo ca 1904
Pomo girl
California
Red Cloud December 26
1905
Sitting Owl Hidatsa
1908
Chief Dan George,
(July 24, 1899 – September 23, 1981)
was a chief of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, a Coast
Salish band wh...
Six Navajo Indians on horseback ca 1904
Slow Bulls wife, Dakota ca 1907
Wedding guests Kwakiutl people in canoes British Columbia ca 1914
Wife of Modoc Henry, Klamath tribe on June 30 1923
Red Bird, Yankton Dakota, Sioux
“Still I would not forget that the pale-faced
missionary and the hoodooed aborigine
are...
Yellow Bull of the Nez Perce
Zosh Clishn, Apache ca 1906
Chief Luther Standing Bear, Oglala Sioux
“There is a road in the hearts of all of us, hidden and
seldom traveled,
which...
Oh Great Spirit,
Whose voice I hear in the winds,
And whose breath gives life to all the world, hear me!
~Chief Yellow ...
Native american ancestors
of 66

Native american ancestors

A photo album from the Library of Congress, Photographer Edward S. Curtis. Names and some quotes with limited available personal information. music cherokee language
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Native american ancestors

  • 1. Si Wa Wata Wa, Zuni ca 1903 The Library of Congress Photographer, Edward S. Curtis Presented by Brenda Music:Amazing Grace in Cherokee
  • 2. Chief Joseph, Nez Percé ca 1903 “All men were made brothers. The earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it. You might as well expect the rivers to run backward as that any man who was born free should be content when penned up and denied liberty to go where he pleases.” ~Heinmot Tooyalaket ( Chief Joseph), Nez Percé Leader
  • 3. White Shield, Arikara ca. 1908
  • 4. White deerskin dance costume, Hupa ca 1923
  • 5. Crazyhorse, Lakota 1840–September 5, 1877 was a Native American war leader of the Oglala Lakota. He took up arms against the U.S. Federal government to fight against encroachments on the territories and way of life of the Lakota people, including leading a war party to victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn in June 1876.
  • 6. Yellow Kidney, Piegan ca 1910
  • 7. Many Goat’s son, Navajo ca 1904
  • 8. Sitting Bull 1831 – December 15, 1890, was a Hunkpapa Lakota holy man who led his people as a tribal chief during years of resistance to United States government policies. He was killed by Indian agency police on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation during an attempt to arrest him, at a time when authorities feared that he would join the ghost Dance movement. “I am a red man. If the Great Spirit had desired me to be a white man he would have made me so in the first place. He put in your heart certain wishes and plans, in my heart he put other and different desires. Each man is good in his sight. It is not necessary for Eagles to be Crows. We are poor … but we are free. No white man controls our footsteps. If we must die … we die defending our rights.” ~Sitting Bull (Ta-Tanka I-Yotank), Lakota Sioux
  • 9. Weasel Tail, Piegan ca 1900
  • 10. An Acoma woman, Acoma ca 1905
  • 11. Wooden Leg was born, in 1858, in the region of the Black Hills, near the Cheyenne river. He was son of Many Bullet Wounds (also called white Buffalo shaking off the Dust) andEagle Feather on the Forehead. He had three brothers (the two elder ones being Strong Wind Blowing and Yellow Hair, the younger one Twin) and two sisters (the elder one being Crooked Nose, the younger one fingers Woman). “The idea of full dress for preparation for a battle comes not from a belief that it will add to the fighting ability. The preparation is for death, in case that should be the result of conflict. Every Indian wants to look his best when he goes to meet the Great Spirit, so the dressing up is done whether the imminent danger is an oncoming battle or a sickness or injury at times of peace.” ~Kummonk, Quiviokta (Wooden Leg), Cheyenne
  • 12. Running Rabbit ca 1900
  • 13. Nez Percé Man, Nez Percé ca 1910
  • 14. WHITE EAGLE (ca. 1840-1914) White Eagle was the hereditary chief of the Ponca Indians. In 1879, when Standing Bear and other Poncas returned to their Nebraska homeland to bury Standing Bear's deceased son, White Eagle led the Ponca who remained in Indian Territory on their assigned reservation. White Eagle reported to a congressional committee in 1880 that they had decided to remain in their adopted home. “When you are in doubt, be still, and wait; when doubt no longer exists for you, then go forward with courage. So long as mists envelop you, be still; be still until the sunlight pours through and dispels the mists — as it surely will. Then act with courage.” ~Ponca Chief White Eagle
  • 15. Head Carry ca 1900
  • 16. Lucille, Dakota
  • 17. A Tluwulahu mask, Tsawatenok ca 1914
  • 18. Bearbull illustrating an ancient Blackfoot method of arranging the hair “What is life? It is a flash of a firefly in the night. It is a breath of a buffalo in the winter time. It is as the little shadow that runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.” ~Crowfoot, Blackfoot Tribal Chief
  • 19. Two Whistles, Apsaroke ca 1908
  • 20. Black Elk, Oglala Lakota (Sioux) “I was standing on the highest mountain of them all, and round about beneath me was the whole hoop of the world. And while I stood there I saw more than I can tell and I understood more than I saw; for I was seeing in a sacred manner the shapes of all things in the spirit, and the shape of all shapes as they must live together like one being. And I saw that the sacred hoop of my people was one of many hoops that made one circle, wide as daylight and as starlight, and in the center grew one mighty flowering tree to shelter all children of one mother and one father. And I saw that it was holy.” ~Hehaka Sapa (Black Elk), a Wichasha Wakan (Medicine Man or Holy Man) and Heyókȟa (sacred clown) of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux)
  • 21. Wishham bride, Tlakluit ca 1910
  • 22. Tah It Way with peace pipe on right ca 1905
  • 23. Iron Breast, Piegan ca 1900
  • 24. Bull Chief Apsaroke, Crow ca 1908
  • 25. Wishham young woman, Tlakluit ca 1910
  • 26. Pah Toi, White Clay, Taos, New Mexico ca 1905
  • 27. Geronimo "the one who yawns"; June 1829 – February 17, 1909) was a prominent leader of the Bedonkohe Apache who fought against Mexico and Texas for their expansion into Apache tribal lands for several decades during the Apache Wars. "Geronimo" was the name given to him during a battle with Mexican soldiers. Geronimo's Chiricahua name is often rendered as Goyathlay or Goyahkla in English.
  • 28. We-Ton ca 1900
  • 29. Ben Long Ear ca 1905
  • 30. Maskette, Nunivak ca 1929
  • 31. Young Hairy Wolf, Apsaroke ca 1905
  • 32. Wisham girl ca 1910
  • 33. Black Hair ca 1905
  • 34. Ten Bears (1792-1872) Comanche name Paruasemena Principal chief of northern Yamparika division of Comanche signed Treaty of Fort Atkinson and Treaty of the Little Arkansas River in Kansas Gave a famous, eloquent address on behalf of his people a 1867 Medicine Lodge Treaty Conference “My heart is filled with joy when I see you here, as brooks fill with water when the snow melts in the spring; and I feel glad, as the ponies do when the fresh grass starts in the beginning of the year. I heard of your coming when I was many sleeps away, and I made but a few camps when I met you. I know that you had come to do good to me and my people. I looked for benefits which would last forever, and so my face shines with joy as I look upon you. My people have never first drawn a bow or fired a gun against the whites. There has been trouble on the line between us and my young men have danced the war dance. But it was not begun by us. It was you to send the first soldier and we who sent out the second. … white man has the country which we loved, and we only wish to wander on the prairie until we die. Any good thing you say to me shall not be forgotten. I shall carry it as near to my heart as my children, and it shall be as often on my tongue as the name of the Great Father. I want no blood upon my land to stain the grass. I want it all clear and pure and I wish it so that all who go through among my people may find peace when they come in and leave it when they go out.” ~Chief Ten Bears (1792-1872), Yamparika (Comanche)
  • 35. One Blue Bead, Crow ca 1908
  • 36. Three Horses ca 1905
  • 37. Lies Sideway, Crow ca 1908
  • 38. Mosa Mojave ca 1903
  • 39. A Kato woman California ca 1924
  • 40. A Mojave man wearing a robe of rabbit skin ca 1907
  • 41. Black Elk Oglala Lakota (Sioux) “The first peace, which is the most important, is that which comes within the souls of people when they realize their relationship, their oneness, with the universe and all its powers, and when they realize that at the center of the universe dwells Wakan-Taka (the Great Spirit), and that this center is really everywhere, it is within each of us. This is the real peace, and the others are but reflections of this. The second peace is that which is made between two individuals, and the third is that which is made between two nations. But above all you should understand that there can never be peace between nations until there is known that true peace, which, as I have often said, is within the souls of men.” ~Hehaka Sapa (Black Elk), a Wichasha Wakan (Medicine Man or Holy Man) and Heyókȟa (sacred clown) of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux)
  • 42. a Hopi Girl ca 1905
  • 43. A Taos girl ca 1905
  • 44. A young Yakima man shell disk earrings ca 1910
  • 45. Big Head ca 1905
  • 46. Chief Seattle, Cherokee “Teach your children what we have taught our children, that the Earth is our mother. Whatever befalls the Earth befalls the sons of the Earth. If men spit upon the ground, they spit upon themselves. This we know — the Earth does not belong to man — man belongs to the Earth. This we know.” ~Chief Seattle May the warm winds of heaven blow softly on this house and the Great Spirit bless all who enter here. Oh Great spirit, grant that I may never find fault with my neighbor until I have walked the trail of life in his moccasins. ~Cherokee prayer
  • 47. Bird Rattle, Piegan ca 1910
  • 48. Cheyenne ca 1910
  • 49. Morning Eagle, Piegan ca 1910
  • 50. Red Jacket (known as Otetiani in his youth and Sagoyewatha (Keeper Awake) Sa-go-ye-wa- tha because of his oratorical skills) (c. 1750–January 20, 1830) was a Native American Seneca orator and chief of the Wolf clan. He negotiated on behalf of his nation with the new United States after the America Revolutionary War, when the Seneca as British allies were forced to cede much land, and signed the Treaty of Canandaigua (1794). He helped secure some Seneca territory in New York state, although most of the people had migrated to Canada for resettlement after the Paris Treaty. “We also have a religion which was given to our forefathers, and has been handed down to us their children. It teaches us to be thankful, to be united, and to love one another! We never quarrel about religion.” ~Chief Red Jacket
  • 51. Navajo Medicine Man ca 1904
  • 52. Nesjaja, Hatalimedicine man, Navajo ca 1904
  • 53. Pomo girl California
  • 54. Red Cloud December 26 1905
  • 55. Sitting Owl Hidatsa 1908
  • 56. Chief Dan George, (July 24, 1899 – September 23, 1981) was a chief of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, a Coast Salish band whose Indian reserve is located on Burrard Inlet in the southeast area of the District of North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He was also an author, poet, and an Academy Award-nominated actor. His best-known written work was "My Heart Soars". “Look at the faces of my people. You will find expressions of love and despair, hope and joy, sadness and desire, and all the human feelings that live in the hearts of people of all colors. Yet, the heart never knows the color of the skin.” ~Chief Dan George, Tsleil-Waututh Nation
  • 57. Six Navajo Indians on horseback ca 1904
  • 58. Slow Bulls wife, Dakota ca 1907
  • 59. Wedding guests Kwakiutl people in canoes British Columbia ca 1914
  • 60. Wife of Modoc Henry, Klamath tribe on June 30 1923
  • 61. Red Bird, Yankton Dakota, Sioux “Still I would not forget that the pale-faced missionary and the hoodooed aborigine are both God’s creatures, though small indeed their own conceptions of Infinite Love. A wee child toddling in a wonder world, I prefer to their dogma my excursions into the natural gardens where the voice of the Great Spirit is heard in the twittering of birds, the rippling of mighty waters, and the sweet breathing of flowers. If this is Paganism, then at present, at least, I am a Pagan.” ~Zitkala-Sa ‘Red Bird (Yankton Dakota, Sioux)
  • 62. Yellow Bull of the Nez Perce
  • 63. Zosh Clishn, Apache ca 1906
  • 64. Chief Luther Standing Bear, Oglala Sioux “There is a road in the hearts of all of us, hidden and seldom traveled, which leads to an unknown, secret place. The old people came literally to love the soil, and they sat or reclined on the ground with a feeling of being close to a mothering power. Their tipis were built upon the earth and their altars were made of earth. The soul was soothing, strengthening, cleansing and healing. That is why the old Indian still sits upon the earth instead of propping himself up and away from its life giving forces. For him, to sit or lie upon the ground is to be able to think more deeply and to feel more keenly. He can see more clearly into the mysteries of life and come closer in kinship to other lives about him.” ~Chief Luther Standing Bear, Oglala Sioux
  • 65. Oh Great Spirit, Whose voice I hear in the winds, And whose breath gives life to all the world, hear me! ~Chief Yellow Lark , Lakota Sioux The End