<ul><li>What does this map reveal about America in the late 19 th century? </li></ul><ul><li>What story is this map telli...
<ul><li>Essential Questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What was the Homestead Act? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the Dawes Act and wh...
<ul><li>Federal law that gave settlers 160 acres of undeveloped land outside of the original 13 colonies </li></ul><ul><li...
<ul><li>Enacted in February 1887 </li></ul><ul><li>Named after its sponsor, U.S. Senator Henry L. Dawes </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Land granted to most Native Americans was not viable to sustain a living </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually the land was...
<ul><li>Under President Jackson, the Congress passed the Indian Removal Act of 1830 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Authorized the P...
<ul><li>George Armstrong Custer of the 7th U.S. Cavalry discovered gold in the Black Hills in 1874 </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘go...
<ul><li>Occurred between June 25-26, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in the Montana Territory </li></ul><ul><li>An arm...
<ul><li>Outrage at Custer's death and defeat brought thousands more soldiers to the area </li></ul><ul><li>Over the next y...
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Native Americans, The U.S. Government, And The Indian Wars

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Native Americans, The U.S. Government, And The Indian Wars

  • 1. <ul><li>What does this map reveal about America in the late 19 th century? </li></ul><ul><li>What story is this map telling? </li></ul><ul><li>What untold story is not being conveyed via this map? </li></ul>The United States, 1860-1869
  • 2. <ul><li>Essential Questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What was the Homestead Act? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the Dawes Act and what was its impact? </li></ul><ul><li>How did the U.S. government treat Native Americans? </li></ul><ul><li>What was the Battle of Little Bighorn? </li></ul>
  • 3. <ul><li>Federal law that gave settlers 160 acres of undeveloped land outside of the original 13 colonies </li></ul><ul><li>The new law required three steps: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>File an application </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve the land </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>File for deed of title </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Eventually 1.6 million homesteads were granted </li></ul><ul><li>270,000,000 acres were privatized </li></ul><ul><li>But whose land was being given away? </li></ul>
  • 4. <ul><li>Enacted in February 1887 </li></ul><ul><li>Named after its sponsor, U.S. Senator Henry L. Dawes </li></ul><ul><li>Authorized the President to have Native American lands surveyed and divided into plots for Native American families </li></ul><ul><li>What did it say? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A Native American family may receive 160 acres if they farm </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80 acres if they are to raise cattle </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>40 acres for “living purposes” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Remained in effect until 1934 </li></ul>
  • 5. <ul><li>Land granted to most Native Americans was not viable to sustain a living </li></ul><ul><li>Eventually the land was sold to non-Native buyers at bargain prices </li></ul><ul><li>Native Americans lost about 90 million acres of land </li></ul><ul><ul><li>90,000 Indians were made landless </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Goal of the Dawes Act:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Complete Native American assimilation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Force the deterioration of the communal life-style of native societies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Impose Western-oriented values of strengthening the nuclear family </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. <ul><li>Under President Jackson, the Congress passed the Indian Removal Act of 1830 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Authorized the President to exchange Native American land east of the Mississippi River for western lands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>About100,000 Native Americans relocated to the West as a result of the policy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tribes in the West were continually moved to smaller and smaller reservations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Government and settlers continued to take their land </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Caused tension and hostility to rise </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Indian Wars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conflicts known as the &quot;Indian Wars&quot; broke out between U.S. forces and tribes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Battle of Little Bighorn </li></ul></ul>
  • 7. <ul><li>George Armstrong Custer of the 7th U.S. Cavalry discovered gold in the Black Hills in 1874 </li></ul><ul><li>A ‘gold rush’ followed and thousands of miners went to the Black Hills…territory controlled by the Lakota </li></ul><ul><li>Treaty of Fort Laramie </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Guaranteed Lakota ownership of the Black Hills, as well as land and hunting rights in South Dakota, Wyoming, and Montana </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In 1876, the United States took control of the region from the Lakota in violation of the Treaty of Fort Laramie </li></ul>
  • 8. <ul><li>Occurred between June 25-26, 1876, near the Little Bighorn River in the Montana Territory </li></ul><ul><li>An armed engagement between the Lakota and the 7 th Cavalry of the Army </li></ul><ul><li>The Lakota were led by Sitting Bull </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sitting Bull was inspired by a vision to fight Custer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>He saw U.S. soldiers being killed as they entered the tribe’s camp </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In the end the U.S. 7 th Cavalry, including 700 men led by Custer, were defeated </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Custer was killed in the battle </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Custer did not realize that more than 3,000 Native Americans had left their reservations to follow Sitting Bull </li></ul>
  • 9. <ul><li>Outrage at Custer's death and defeat brought thousands more soldiers to the area </li></ul><ul><li>Over the next year, the new military forces pursued the Lakota, forcing many to surrender </li></ul><ul><li>Sitting Bull refused to surrender </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In May 1877 he led his followers across the border into Canada where he remained in exile </li></ul></ul>