Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report, 2011 National Action Guide ...
Children’s Food EnvironmentState Indicator Report, 2011 ...
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Federal Support of State-level Food Policy Councils and Networks - National Action Guide 2011

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Self Improvement      Health & Medicine      
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Transcripts - Federal Support of State-level Food Policy Councils and Networks - National Action Guide 2011

  • 1. Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report, 2011 National Action Guide The Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report, 2011 National Action Guide highlights selected behaviors, environments, and policies that affect childhood obesity nationally. It provides information on selected food environment indicators related to less healthful behaviors among children such as the consumption of less healthy foods and sugar drinks. The behavioral indicators describe sugar drink consumption, television viewing, television in the bedroom, and family meal time among children and adolescents. The policy and environmental indicators measure components of food environments across child care facilities, schools, and the community. For detailed descriptions of the indicators and how they relate to healthy eating and obesity, please see the Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report at http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/. This guide provides potential actions that state leaders, coalitions, community-based organizations, and professionals can take alone or in partnership to support state residents’ purchase and consumption of more healthful foods.Behavioral IndicatorsThe National Action Guide provides an overviewof four behavioral indicators for the nation: Percentage of high school students who drank ≥1 sugar-sweetened soda per day Percentage of high school students who watched television ≥3 hours per day Percentage of children, ages 6-17, with television in their bedroom Percentage of children, ages 12-17, who do not eat meals with their families most days of the weekPolicy and Environmental IndicatorsChild Care Facility Food EnvironmentState licensing regulations that ensure child care facilities maintain healthy food environments can help instill healthy eating habits. Indicator National Data State regulations restrict sugar drinks in child care centers and family child care homes 2 states State regulations require access to drinking water throughout the day in child care centers and family child care 27 states homes State regulations limit television and video time in child care centers and family child care homes 18 statesPotential Actions Enact or revise licensing regulations and Quality Rating Improvement Systems to reduce or eliminate the availability of less healthy foods and sugar drinks, and to restrict screen time in child care settings. Encourage child care providers to conduct self-assessments of their centers or homes to identify improvements that they can make in their policies, practices, and environment related to healthier foods and beverages. Integrate nutrition and screen time best practices into provider training, certification and continuing education opportunities. Provide technical assistance and resources to child care providers through a state network of early childhood development and health that includes multiple stakeholders including Child Care Resource and Referral agencies, Cooperative Extension, Advisory Councils, Health Consultants, and the AAP State Chapter Child Care contact. Increase access to healthier foods in child care with Farm to Preschool programs, purchasing cooperatives, and gardening initiatives.Resources Preventing Obesity In The Child Care Setting: Evaluating State Regulations: http://cfm.mc.duke.edu/wysiwyg/downloads/State_Reports_Final.pdf Caring for Our Children: Preventing Childhood Obesity in Early Care and Education Programs: http://nrckids.org/CFOC3/PDFVersion/preventing_obesity.pdf Food Research & Action Center: Child Care Food Program Wellness Tool Kit: http://frac.org/federal-foodnutrition-programs/child-and-adult-care-program/child-care-wellness-plans-and-policies/ National Child Care Information and Technical Assistance Center: Quality Rating & Improvement System Resource Guide: http://nccic.acf.hhs.gov/qrisresourceguide/ National Association of Child Care Resource & Referral Agencies: http://www.naccrra.org/ AAP Healthy Child Care America. http://healthychildcare.org/cccc.html National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, & Obesity
  • 2. Children’s Food EnvironmentState Indicator Report, 2011 National Action GuideSchool Food EnvironmentSchools are uniquely positioned to model and reinforce healthful eating by eliminating sugar drinks and high energy density foods (foods high inadded sugars and fats) from the selection of foods offered on the school campus. Indicator National Data Percentage of middle and high schools that offer sugar drinks as competitive foods 64.4%* Percentage of middle and high schools that offer less healthy foods as competitive foods 51.4%* Percentage of middle and high schools that allow advertising of less healthy foods 49.0%* *Because national estimates were not available for these indicators, these data reflect the medians of state estimates.Potential Actions Work with school districts to enroll elementary, middle, and high schools in USDA’s Team Nutrition program and apply for certification through the HealthierUS School Challenge. Collaborate with state and district school officials to establish school wellness and nutrition policies to increase free drinking water access and eliminate the sale of sugar drinks on school grounds, including vending machines, concessions, and fundraisers. Support school districts in implementing strong nutrition standards that restrict the availability of less healthy foods and sugar drinks. Work with school districts to revise existing food and beverage contracts so that only healthier food options are available to students. Collaborate with state and school district officials to redefine or eliminate beverage “pouring contracts” in schools.Resources USDA Team Nutrition and HealthierUS School Challenge website: http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/healthierUS/index.html Making It Happen: School Nutrition Success Stories: http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/Making-It-Happen/index.htm Water in Schools website: http://www.waterinschools.org/ CDC Fact Sheets about IOM Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools: http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/standards.htm NPLAN: Model Healthy Beverage Vending Agreement: http://www.nplanonline.org/nplan/products/model-healthy-beverage-vending-agreement CDC resource on Local Wellness Policy Tools & Resources for schools: http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/healthtopics/wellness.htmCommunity Food EnvironmentStrategies to improve the community food environment include increased access and availability to healthier food retailers. The modified Retail FoodEnvironment Index (mRFEI) measures the number of healthy and less healthy food retailers within a census tract using the formula shown. For this indicator, healthy food retailers include supermarkets, supercenters, and produce stores.† Less healthy food retailers include convenience stores, fast food restaurants, and small grocery stores with 3 or fewer employees.† Higher mRFEI scores indicate more access to healthy food retailers and fewer less healthy food retailers. Indicator National Data* Modified Retail Food Environment Index across census tracts within state 10 Modified Retail Food Environment Index across impoverished census tracts within state 7*The numbers shown for national data are the medians of all state scores.† Areas without these types of healthy food retailers may still provide adequate access if smaller stores and fast food restaurants provide quality and affordable healthy foods and beverages.Potential Actions Provide incentives for small food store owners in underserved areas to carry healthier, affordable food items (e.g. tax breaks/credits, loans, and grants to purchase equipment to store produce and fat free/low fat dairy; or facilitate linkages to wholesale distributors). Create incentive programs to attract supermarkets and grocery stores to underserved neighborhoods (e.g., tax breaks/credits, loans, and grants to cover start-up and investment costs; economic development programs; supportive zoning, negotiation assistance). Target public transportation and public safety efforts to ensure community residents can access healthy food retailers easily and affordably. Promote farmers’ markets, farm stands, mobile markets, and community gardens as venues for healthy foods. Support restaurant programs that offer and promote healthier food options.Resources NPLAN Creating a Healthy Food Zone Around Schools: http://www.nplanonline.org/nplan/products/creating-healthy-food-zone-around-schools PolicyLink Improving Access to Healthy Food: http://www.policylink.org/site/c.lkIXLbMNJrE/b.5136643/k.1E5B/Improving_Access_to_Healthy_Food.htm The Food Trust: Our Projects: Community-Based Programs http://www.thefoodtrust.org/index.php General Resources The national and state data sources included in the Children’s Food Environment State Indicator Report, 2011 are available at http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/. For more information, please contact FoodEnvironmentReport@cdc.gov or visit http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpao. Links to non-Federal organizations are provided solely as a service to our users. These links do not constitute an endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the Federal Government, and none should be inferred. CDC is not responsible for the content of the individual organization Web pages found at these links.

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