Natural Skin Care Products - Positive Power Nutrition
We're all too familiar with organic food labels. Most of the ones fo...
natural alternatives to the chemical ones. You can not make a truly organic product with synthetic
chemicals.
Another hint...
of 2

Natural Skin Care Products - Positive Power Nutrition

We're all too familiar with organic food labels. Most of the ones found here in the U.S. display the...
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Natural Skin Care Products - Positive Power Nutrition

  • 1. Natural Skin Care Products - Positive Power Nutrition We're all too familiar with organic food labels. Most of the ones found here in the U.S. display the USDA Organic seal or sticker, others show other organic certifiers such as QAI (Quality Assurance International) or CCOF (California Certified Organic Farmers) and many more. The food items displaying these labels earn a healthy toss into the grocery cart, leaving us with a reassurance that it's clean, tasty, good and non-toxic for the earth. But, the questions arises, what about organic skin care products? Should we be looking for the same labels? Just how "organic" are the skin care products claiming to be organic, are the terms "natural" and "organic" the same, and, does it even matter? A little Skin Trivia - Studies have proven, time and time again, that nothing you apply on your skin stays on the surface unless you immediately rinse it off. Your skin, being your bodies largest organ, has over 1 billion pores. It usually takes 10-15 minutes for a product to be completely absorbed into your skin, by this time, it is inside your body, "subcutaneously", which means underneath your skin. The dilemma: This leaves us with the dilemma that, if we apply lotions, perfumes, make-up, oils, deodorants and other cosmetics on a daily basis, the stuff will definitely get absorbed and inside. In essence, you are FEEDING your skin whatever that product is. Simply put, if you wouldn't eat it, you probably shouldn't be putting it on your skin, make sense? Your skin is a living organ, similar to your other organs like your digestive system. So if you are eating organic foods but using toxic and synthetic skin products skin care products, it sort of defeats the purpose of what your trying to do. A lot of people see this dilemma, and now more and more companies are coming out with products termed as "All Natural", "Organic" and "Cruelty Free" to meet consumers healthier demands. This seems great, but has only made things harder because shopping can be pretty difficult if you don't know what to look for. The only thing you know is that you want only natural, organic products on your skin; but how can you really tell what's truly organic? What to look for at the store: Yes, you must take time to read the label! Soon you'll be reading labels in less than 5 seconds like a pro! No reputable organic, natural or holistic company will use ANY of these because there are always
  • 2. natural alternatives to the chemical ones. You can not make a truly organic product with synthetic chemicals. Another hint - the first 3 are what mainly comprises the product, making the last ingredients what's least in there. Sadly, some cosmetic companies put products out there with names like "Aloe Lotion", when Aloe is the very last ingredient on that list (and usually it's some petty form like"aloe extract", the sneaks!) So is it truly "Aloe lotion" or more like "Water + Mineral Oil Lotion"? Go to your bathroom right now and check it out, there's a whole world of labels to be discovered right in your own home. It's an eye opening experience. Have a trash bag ready; so what do those organic seals mean? Well, if you've found a skin care product with an organic certifying seal, let's just say it's probably good (or at least a step ahead of most). Most natural skin care products have never, until recently, had organic seals certifying them like food items. Again, with the raging consumer demand for more organic products, organic certifier seals have been showing Body Mask up on a lot of skin care products. It takes effort, money and time to get organically certified. Chances are, if a company went that extra mile to get that seal of approval, their stuff and the ethics behind their stuff is probably really good (or at least well intentioned). Organic cosmetic certifiers: There are Seals, and then there are "Seals"... The following is a list of organic certifying seals you will commonly find on most cosmetics out there. This list is in a particular order. Differences between "Natural" and "Organic":. Same thing, grown differently. Some products will not have any of the synthetic chemicals listed above and therefore be termed as "all natural", "toxin/chemical free" or say things like, "No SLS, Glycols, or Parabens". Please note, "NATURAL" DOES NOT MEAN "ORGANIC"! A conventionally grown tomato is "natural", but it was grown using pesticides and sewage sludge; so it's not "organic". See the difference? Organically grown fruits and vegetables have significantly lower levels of nitrates, and higher levels of antioxidants and vitamins particular to that fruit or vegetable. The same theory applies for skin care products. A Papaya-Coconut Lotion can have 100 % natural skin products ingredients with no synthetics, but if the papaya, coconut and the rest of the stuff in there is not organic, then it was grown using pesticides and therefore can only be termed "all natural" but not organic. This All Natural Papaya-Coconut Lotion would be an inferior product compared to a Certified Organic Papaya Lotion. No seal no deal? The organic certifying seal guarantees that some if not all the ingredients are organic. It's the difference between buying organic and conventional tomatoes, going back to the example above. The "greener" of a world we become, the more the idea of organic skin care products that actually work for us and the earth will become a reality.

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