National Black HIV/AIDS
Awareness Day
Dana D. Hines, PhD, MSN, RN
Quality Program Manager
Ryan White HIV/AIDS Services Pro...
Disclaimers/Disclosures
• I am not a medical doctor, I am a doctor of
philosophy
• The views expressed in this presentatio...
Acknowledgements
• Michael Wallace, Ryan White HIV/AIDS
Services Program Director and the Ryan White
Staff
• Tammie Nelson...
Future leader, HIV advocate,
and LGBT ally
The Making of an Advocate
Visual of AIDS Deaths
Estimated Numbers of Perinatally Acquired AIDS Cases by Year
of Diagnosis, 1985–2010 — United States and Dependent Areas
Y...
Common Myths about HIV
• HIV is a “gay” disease
• You can’t get HIV from a one time sexual
encounter
• If you are HIV nega...
U.S. Population
by Race
U.S. Poverty Map
U.S. Unemployment Map
Chronic Disease Burden
Facts about HIV
• African Americans are the racial/ethnic group
most affected by HIV.
• The rate of new HIV infection in A...
Diagnoses of HIV Infection and Population
by Race/Ethnicity, 2014—United States
Note. Data include persons with a diagnosi...
Black History Quiz
Eazy-E
Phill WilsonArthur Ashe
Magic JohnsonAlvin Ailey
Rae Lewis Thornton
HIV Diagnosis among
Black Men and Women
1 in 16 Black men will be diagnosed
with HIV in his lifetime
1 in 32 Black women w...
Driving Factors
Attitudes towards
condoms
Misconceptions about HIV
risk
Perceptions about sexual
responsibility
Intimacy a...
HIV Testing Teens & Young Adults
Over 50% of youth with HIV in the United States
do not know they are infected.
Quick Facts
• Youth aged 13 to 24
accounted for an
estimated 26% of all
new HIV infections
in the United States
in 2010.
•...
Historical HIV Incidence by
Race/Ethnicity
Source: eHARS, U.S. Census Bureau Ref: MCPHD EPI DR2712
0
50
100
150
1995
1996
...
PrEP
Challenges with PrEP
• Knowledge level
• Cost (~$13,000/yr)
• Stigma “whore pill”
• Lack of perceived risk
• Concerns abou...
Opportunities for Improvement
AIDS-Free
Generation
• Widespread HIV testing and
linkage to care
• Support for people living
with HIV to keep them in
car...
National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day
of 25

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Presentation for the Marion County Public Health Department.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

  • 1. National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day Dana D. Hines, PhD, MSN, RN Quality Program Manager Ryan White HIV/AIDS Services Program Marion County Health Department
  • 2. Disclaimers/Disclosures • I am not a medical doctor, I am a doctor of philosophy • The views expressed in this presentation may not always represent the views/positions of the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Services Program or the Marion County Public Health Department • I am an HIV and LGBTQ ally and advocate • I have no financial conflicts of interest to disclose
  • 3. Acknowledgements • Michael Wallace, Ryan White HIV/AIDS Services Program Director and the Ryan White Staff • Tammie Nelson, Epidemiologist Marion County Public Health Department • Substance Use and Outreach Services Program
  • 4. Future leader, HIV advocate, and LGBT ally The Making of an Advocate
  • 5. Visual of AIDS Deaths
  • 6. Estimated Numbers of Perinatally Acquired AIDS Cases by Year of Diagnosis, 1985–2010 — United States and Dependent Areas Year of diagnosis No.ofcases 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 2001 2003 2005 200719991997199519931991198919871985 2009 2011 Note: Data have been adjusted for reporting delays and missing risk-factor information. 8
  • 7. Common Myths about HIV • HIV is a “gay” disease • You can’t get HIV from a one time sexual encounter • If you are HIV negative and your partner is HIV positive, then you will also acquire HIV • Magic Johnson no longer has HIV • Babies born to HIV-infected mothers will get HIV • HIV is no longer a public health concern • People get HIV because they are “irresponsible.”
  • 8. U.S. Population by Race
  • 9. U.S. Poverty Map
  • 10. U.S. Unemployment Map
  • 11. Chronic Disease Burden
  • 12. Facts about HIV • African Americans are the racial/ethnic group most affected by HIV. • The rate of new HIV infection in African Americans is 8 times that of whites based on population size. • Gay and bisexual men account for most new infections among African Americans – Young gay and bisexual men aged 13 to 24 are the most affected of this group.
  • 13. Diagnoses of HIV Infection and Population by Race/Ethnicity, 2014—United States Note. Data include persons with a diagnosis of HIV infection regardless of stage of disease at diagnosis. All displayed data have been statistically adjusted to account for reporting delays, but not for incomplete reporting. a Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.
  • 14. Black History Quiz Eazy-E Phill WilsonArthur Ashe Magic JohnsonAlvin Ailey Rae Lewis Thornton
  • 15. HIV Diagnosis among Black Men and Women 1 in 16 Black men will be diagnosed with HIV in his lifetime 1 in 32 Black women will be diagnosed with HIV in her lifetime
  • 16. Driving Factors Attitudes towards condoms Misconceptions about HIV risk Perceptions about sexual responsibility Intimacy and trust versus risk Misconceptions about black men with HIV
  • 17. HIV Testing Teens & Young Adults Over 50% of youth with HIV in the United States do not know they are infected.
  • 18. Quick Facts • Youth aged 13 to 24 accounted for an estimated 26% of all new HIV infections in the United States in 2010. • Most new HIV infections among youth occur among gay and bisexual males Estimates of New Infections Among Youth Aged 13-24 by Race/Ethnicity and Sex, United States 2010
  • 19. Historical HIV Incidence by Race/Ethnicity Source: eHARS, U.S. Census Bureau Ref: MCPHD EPI DR2712 0 50 100 150 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 HIVDiagnoses(N) Newly Diagnosed HIV by Race/Ethnicity, Marion County (IN): 1995-2014 Asian/Pacific Islander Black Hispanic White
  • 20. PrEP
  • 21. Challenges with PrEP • Knowledge level • Cost (~$13,000/yr) • Stigma “whore pill” • Lack of perceived risk • Concerns about side effects • Physicians not comfortable prescribing HIV meds to non-HIV infected persons
  • 22. Opportunities for Improvement
  • 23. AIDS-Free Generation • Widespread HIV testing and linkage to care • Support for people living with HIV to keep them in care • Universal viral suppression among people living with HIV • Full access to PrEP for high risk individuals and communities

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