Effects of Narrative, Nurturing, and Game-Play in an Action-Adventure Health Game Presentation to the Games for Health Co...
 
Games are stories and games are challenges / mechanics <ul><li>Some emphasize the narrative mode and some the game-p...
Example: PIP <ul><li>Personal Input Pod – biosensor </li></ul><ul><li>Vyro Games </li></ul><ul><li>“ Teaching you to relax...
Two modes: narrative vs. game-play <ul><li>Across players: Some players prefer one mode over the other (always or somet...
Research finds that using narrative skillfully in game design can increase players’… <ul><li>Involvement in the topic <...
Narrative creates emotion and context <ul><li>Why you’re doing what you’re doing </li></ul><ul><li>Characters you care abo...
Pure game-play <ul><li>Focuses on the task, on the rules of the game </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive load – none wasted </li><...
Nurturing <ul><li>A new concept in new (interactive) media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Old media: Tinker Bell, Winky Dink, pause...
Re-Mission – video game <ul><li>Produced by HopeLab http://www.hopelab.org </li></ul><ul><li>For teens and young adults ...
Our previous study found that Re-Mission influenced healthy players who had no cancer <ul><li>It changed attitudes and ...
Cancer knowledge (Study 1, posttest scores)
Predicting prevention behaviors (Study 1, posttest scores)
Predicting adherence (Study 1, posttest scores)
First study gave us outcomes of Re-Mission <ul><li>New questions for second study: </li></ul><ul><li>How do narrative, nu...
Study design <ul><li>Randomized experiment, 488 participants </li></ul><ul><li>5 groups, each played a Re-Mission version...
Today I’ll present preliminary findings for three groups <ul><li>Group 5: Low narrative, Low nurturing (game-play) </li><...
Knowledge and perceived informativeness – lower in Low/Low (game-play) group (Study 2, posttest scores)
Attitudes about cancer learning – No differences (Study 2, posttest scores)
Caring about patients in the game (Study 2, posttest scores)
Narrative  personal risks and behaviors (Study 2, posttest scores)
Game-play  mechanics of cure (Study 2, posttest scores)
Narrative  personal risks and behaviors; and learning Game-play  mechanics of cure <ul><li>Empathy, nurturing, dra...
Participants’ quotes while playing Re-Mission <ul><li>Pretty cool. You could learn from it while having fun. </li></ul><u...
Thank you <ul><li>Debra Lieberman, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li>University of California, Santa Barbara </li></ul><ul><li>[emai...
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Narrative and Nurturing study, Lieberman, Games for Health 5-9-08

Presents posttest-only preliminary findings from an experiment comparing three versions of a health game with high versus low amounts of dramatic narrative. It contrasts high narrative versions of the game with a low narrative version that puts more focus on game-play challenges instead of story line.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      Entertainment & Humor      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Narrative and Nurturing study, Lieberman, Games for Health 5-9-08

  • 1. Effects of Narrative, Nurturing, and Game-Play in an Action-Adventure Health Game Presentation to the Games for Health Conference Baltimore, MD Debra Lieberman, Ph.D. UC Santa Barbara May 9, 2008
  • 3. Games are stories and games are challenges / mechanics <ul><li>Some emphasize the narrative mode and some the game-play mode </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g., Pacman or Zelda vs. Tetris, Re-Mission vs. Self-Esteem games </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A spectrum – the essence of a game: Story  Game mechanics </li></ul><ul><li>Narratology vs. Ludology – debate </li></ul>
  • 4. Example: PIP <ul><li>Personal Input Pod – biosensor </li></ul><ul><li>Vyro Games </li></ul><ul><li>“ Teaching you to relax in a fun and engaging way” </li></ul><ul><li>Narrative : Will your character win the race? </li></ul><ul><li>Game-play : Relax more than your opponent </li></ul>
  • 5. Two modes: narrative vs. game-play <ul><li>Across players: Some players prefer one mode over the other (always or sometimes) </li></ul><ul><li>Within players: Each mode may be cognitively and/or emotionally processed in different ways, and contribute to different outcomes </li></ul>
  • 6. Research finds that using narrative skillfully in game design can increase players’… <ul><li>Involvement in the topic </li></ul><ul><li>Immersion in the game experience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Related: Presence, Flow, Absorption, Transportation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identification with characters </li></ul><ul><li>Arousal : emotional and physiological </li></ul><ul><li>Learning : recall of message content </li></ul><ul><li>Persuasibility : acceptance of persuasive messages </li></ul>
  • 7. Narrative creates emotion and context <ul><li>Why you’re doing what you’re doing </li></ul><ul><li>Characters you care about, or characters that are you </li></ul><ul><li>Curiosity about what will happen next </li></ul><ul><li>Desire to advance the story </li></ul><ul><li>A framework for remembering events / info </li></ul>
  • 8. Pure game-play <ul><li>Focuses on the task, on the rules of the game </li></ul><ul><li>Cognitive load – none wasted </li></ul><ul><li>No distracting story line </li></ul><ul><li>In games with stories, good players often “see through” the story line to play with the “essence” of the game – its strategies and challenges </li></ul>
  • 9. Nurturing <ul><li>A new concept in new (interactive) media </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Old media: Tinker Bell, Winky Dink, pause / answer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>New media — new ways to take care of characters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital pets, Tamagotchi, WebKinz, NeoPets, Nintendogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adventure games often involve building a character’s health, strength, weapons, tools, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Nurturing is very motivating and involving, and elicits strong emotions </li></ul><ul><li>It is a component of narrative </li></ul><ul><li>How can health game designers make use of narrative , nurturing , and game-play ? </li></ul>
  • 10. Re-Mission – video game <ul><li>Produced by HopeLab http://www.hopelab.org </li></ul><ul><li>For teens and young adults who have cancer </li></ul><ul><li>To improve cancer knowledge, adherence, self-care, quality of life </li></ul>
  • 11. Our previous study found that Re-Mission influenced healthy players who had no cancer <ul><li>It changed attitudes and beliefs that are known to increase prevention behaviors and adherence behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Factors in the Extended Parallel Process Model – Perceived severity, Perceived susceptibility, Self-efficacy, and Response Efficacy </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment – Play Re-Mission game for one hour </li></ul><ul><li>Control – Play Indiana Jones game for one hour </li></ul>
  • 12. Cancer knowledge (Study 1, posttest scores)
  • 13. Predicting prevention behaviors (Study 1, posttest scores)
  • 14. Predicting adherence (Study 1, posttest scores)
  • 15. First study gave us outcomes of Re-Mission <ul><li>New questions for second study: </li></ul><ul><li>How do narrative, nurturing, and game-play influence these outcomes in different ways? </li></ul><ul><li>In the following analysis of post-test findings from the second study, our hypotheses are supported. </li></ul>
  • 16. Study design <ul><li>Randomized experiment, 488 participants </li></ul><ul><li>5 groups, each played a Re-Mission version: </li></ul><ul><li>Group 1: High narrative, High nurturing </li></ul><ul><li>Group 2: Original version of Re-Mission </li></ul><ul><li>Group 3: High narrative, Low nurturing </li></ul><ul><li>Group 4: Low narrative, High nurturing </li></ul><ul><li>Group 5: Low narrative, Low nurturing (game-play) </li></ul>
  • 17. Today I’ll present preliminary findings for three groups <ul><li>Group 5: Low narrative, Low nurturing (game-play) </li></ul><ul><li>Group 2: Original version of Re-Mission </li></ul><ul><li>Group 1: High narrative, High nurturing </li></ul><ul><li>Participants were randomly assigned to play one game version in the lab; also pretest and posttest </li></ul>
  • 18. Knowledge and perceived informativeness – lower in Low/Low (game-play) group (Study 2, posttest scores)
  • 19. Attitudes about cancer learning – No differences (Study 2, posttest scores)
  • 20. Caring about patients in the game (Study 2, posttest scores)
  • 21. Narrative  personal risks and behaviors (Study 2, posttest scores)
  • 22. Game-play  mechanics of cure (Study 2, posttest scores)
  • 23. Narrative  personal risks and behaviors; and learning Game-play  mechanics of cure <ul><li>Empathy, nurturing, drama, story line – our data show positive correlations with perceived personal risks, self-efficacy, and learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Players see personal risks of health problems and personal susceptibility more strongly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Perceive more self-efficacy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn more about cancer than the Low/Low group </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Focus on game-play with medical treatment as the game challenge – is associated with greater trust in the medical cure, and adherence self-efficacy </li></ul>
  • 24. Participants’ quotes while playing Re-Mission <ul><li>Pretty cool. You could learn from it while having fun. </li></ul><ul><li>Did we heal him? I’m so excited! </li></ul><ul><li>It makes it seem like cancer is a serious disease. </li></ul><ul><li>I keep killing these fools but they keep on coming. </li></ul><ul><li>I feel like I’m helping somebody. Not just playing a video game, I’m saving someone’s life. </li></ul><ul><li>I really like this game now. It sucks you in. I really don’t want this guy to have cancer. </li></ul><ul><li>Come on, white blood cells! </li></ul>
  • 25. Thank you <ul><li>Debra Lieberman, Ph.D. </li></ul><ul><li>University of California, Santa Barbara </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>National Program Director, Health Games Research </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.healthgamesresearch.org </li></ul><ul><li>------------- </li></ul><ul><li>Re-Mission video game, from HopeLab </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.hopelab.org </li></ul>

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