PRESTASI:
A JOURNEY
22
PRESTASI:
A JOURNEY
PRESTASI:
A JOURNEY
CONTENTS
Introduction 5
A GLANCE AT PRESTASI 7
PRESTASI Overview 7
Achievers of PRESTASI 9
OUTREACH AND SELECTION 12
Outre...
IIEF – Indonesian International Education Foundation - USAID Contractor
Menara Imperium 28th Floor, Suite A, Jl. H.R. Rasu...
T
his report is about the journey of the PRESTASI scholarship
program from April 2011 to September 2012. Experiences,
stor...
services to the community and being voluntarily committed to implementing
new ideas and services to the wider community; h...
PRESTASI OVERVIEW
The word “prestasi”, according
to the Indonesian Dictionary
(KBBI), means: achievements.
When used as a ...
Institute of International Education
(IIE), an international organization
based in New York and Washington
DC, which is on...
the best candidates from the
region to compete at national
level. The final determination or
final decision is made by a t...
from outside Java, and 36% were
from Java. The employment
backgrounds of the 37 PRESTASI
scholars were varied consisting o...
objectives PRESTASI which want to
give more attention to areas that
are under-represented.
The gender of scholars
continue...
OUTREACH
REACHING OUT OVER THE
COUNTRY
To get the best young
Indonesians to be awarded
postgraduate scholarships,
PRESTASI...
This strategy is preceded by
mapping with records and by
conducting preliminary research to
observe any city to be visited...
were very keen to know more about
the PRESTASI program.
The PRESTASI team gained
many unexpected and impressive
results du...
2011 the PRESTASI booth was visit-
ed by 1,300 visitors. In October 2011
PRESTASI also participated in the
IPB Education E...
1166
PRESTASI:
A JOURNEY
OPTIMIZATION OF WEBSITE
AND SOCIAL MEDIA
In the era of the Internet and the
rise of social media ...
1177
O
ne interesting story concerned with how
PRESTASI information live in cyberspace
could reach potential candidates in...
THREE PLUS ONE:
THE POWERFUL SUPPLIES
Having selected the best of
Indonesia’s children for the
PRESTASI Scholarships it’s ...
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
TRAINING (ENGLISH FOR
ACADEMIC PURPOSES / EAP)
English Language Training is
very important to improve the...
they may compete positively to get
a high score. High scores certainly
have a good impact and they could
find schools more...
those who already have TOEFL®ITP
500’s. The second class is for 450
hours and is for the average
competency. The third cla...
providing language training for
various groups ranging from
government departments, non-
governmental organizations (NGOs)...
STATISTICS TRAINING
The second provision the
participants get is statistics
training. The participants are
trained in the ...
example, A who seems calm turns out
to be very ambitious. There are
games in the course, which shows
that A justified the ...
F
or the leadership training for the PRESTASI
participants IIEF works in cooperation with PT
Daya Insani, which has much e...
only 50 percent. In fact they want to success
completely. But others say, maybe I’m not as good as
you, but I also want to...
EVALUATION: INDUCTION IS SO
MEANINGFUL
An important induction is given
to the PRESTASI scholarship
recipients. But how doe...
Here is a summary of the views
of some student candidates after
attending English Language,
Statistics and Leadership Trai...
“This induction provides
comprehensive information about
what to do before, during, and after
studying in the United State...
to fill out the application, which the
details of requirements had been
prepared by the PRESTASI IIEF. The
applications we...
scholarship program for more than
20 years IIEF is well aware of a few
things that attract the attention of
the leading ca...
and helped them in adapting to the
new environment and made their
relationship closer.
When Fellabaum met the
PRESTASI stu...
advance that they should bring a
hat and shirt or graduation toga.
Having finished the workshop
sessions, wearing a toga, ...
ALPHA-I ALREADY
ROCKING STEP
Having completed their studies in
the United States and Indonesia the
PRESTASI scholarship re...
(Education) as a secretary and three
members of the formation: Jatmiko
Wahyu Nugroho Joshua (Democratic
Governance), Ni Ke...
ALPHA-I, which stands for the
Association of Alumni PRESTASI -
HICD America Indonesia.
As well as the name of the
organiza...
School’, specifically for Jakarta and its
surrounding areas. These activities
include: first, a writing contest with the
s...
AGUS YUDI WICAKSONO
MMaasstteerr iinn PPuubblliicc PPoolliiccyy,, MMiicchhiiggaann SSttaattee UUnniivveerrssiittyy,, EEaas...
is made to decline so that people in
wheelchairs can go down without any
help,” told the second of four brothers.
Since th...
equivalent to S1 and Yudi finally went
through.
When registering for PRESTASI
Yudi found it difficult to qualify. His
TOEF...
the Ministry of Home Affairs, Anselmus
Tan. “He was the mainstay of my
confirmation,” said Anselmus. Yudi, said
Anselmus, ...
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Prestasi a journey

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Published on: Mar 4, 2016
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Transcripts - Prestasi a journey

  • 1. PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 2. 22 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 3. CONTENTS Introduction 5 A GLANCE AT PRESTASI 7 PRESTASI Overview 7 Achievers of PRESTASI 9 OUTREACH AND SELECTION 12 Outreach 12 Reaching Out Over the Country 12 Optimization of Website and Social Media 16 Selection 18 Tight Selection Stages, but Fair 18 Applicant Reviews with Credibility and Integrity 22 TRAINING AND MONITORING 39 Three Plus One: The Powerful Supplies 39 English Language Training (English for Academic Purposes/EAP) 41 Statistics Training 44 Leadership Training 44 Evaluation: Induction is So Meaningful 48 Pre-Departure Orientation 49 From the Departure to Taking Part 50 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, ACTING PLACE WHILE BACK 55 ALPHA-I Already Rocking Step 55 BEHIND THE SCENES OF PRESTASI 112 CHIEF OF PARTY - PRESTASI IIEF: Mira Sambada PRESTASI REPORT MANAGER: Devi Miarni Umar EDITORS OF INDONESIAN VERSION: Devi Miarni Umar, Lensi Mursida, Bambang P Putranto, Hari Nugroho AUTHORS: Hari Nugroho, Lensi Mursida, Veby Mega Indah LANGUAGE EDITOR OF INDONESIA VERSION: Lensi Mursida REPORTER COORDINATOR: Yophiandi Kurniawan REPORTERS JAKARTA: Veby Mega Indah, Wenri Wanhar, Okky Mulyadi JAYAPURA: Katharina Lita YOGYAKARTA AND SALATIGA: Hari Nugroho PHOTOGRAPHERS: Wahono Kolopaking, Ratri Pratiwi, Bodi Chandra, Hari Nugroho, Katharina Lita TRANSLATOR: Diyan Srikandini EDITOR OF ENGLISH VERSION: Diyan Srikandini PROOFREADER: Patrick M Compau COVER AND LAYOUT DESIGNER: Iftachul Ngumar PRESTASI GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IIEF – INDONESIAN INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION FOUNDATION, Menara Imperium 28th Floor, Suite A, Jl. H.R. Rasuna Said Kav. 1, Kuningan, Jakarta Selatan 12980 – INDONESIA PHONE: +62 21 8370 9982 FAX: +62 21 83709983 WEBSITE: www.prestasi-iief.org
  • 4. IIEF – Indonesian International Education Foundation - USAID Contractor Menara Imperium 28th Floor, Suite A, Jl. H.R. Rasuna Said Kav. 1, Kuningan, Jakarta Selatan 12980 – INDONESIA Phone: +62 21 8370 9982 Fax: +62 21 83709983 Website: www.prestasi-iief.org 44 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 5. T his report is about the journey of the PRESTASI scholarship program from April 2011 to September 2012. Experiences, stories, achievements and challenges faced by the PRESTASI team in providing services to recipients, alumni and other stakeholders are summarized in the report PPRREESSTTAASSII:: AA JJoouurrnneeyy. To get a comprehensive story from various perspectives we dropped a full team to conduct interviews with various parties, either directly or indirectly involved in the PRESTASI scholarship program, which is fully supported by USAID. More than 86 speakers were involved and interviewed by our team to complete this report. Those interviewed included our team in PRESTASI IIEF - Indonesian International Education Foundation and our partners in the United States from the Institute of International Education (IIE) who shared their stories of joy and sorrow in running the PRESTASI program, from the outreach and selection stages up until welcoming the alumni back to Indonesia and their excitement when forming an alumni association. We also visited a number of Independent Reviewers and Regional Interviewers who were directly involved in the selection process and noted their experiences during the process - which is full of competition. They are national leaders who have expertise in their respective fields within a variety of professions, such as lecturers and professors from several universities, NGO leaders and economic observers and practitioners. We see the enthusiasm of the Indonesian national leaders who welcomed the scholarship program and provided some valuable feedback for us. Their opinions, impressions and interest are in the section entitled “Applicant Reviews with Credibility and Integrity”. In addition, we also interviewed our partners, the actors and think tanks backstage at Pre-Academic Training (PAT) PRESTASI: representatives of the International Language Institute, University of Indonesia (LBI-UI) that provided the PRESTASI scholars with English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Tutorials, two professors from the Institute for Research and Community Service (LPPM) Atma Jaya Catholic University Jakarta that provided statistical and SPSS training materials in a fun and exciting way as well as expert Human Resources (HR) who are also psychologists, PT Daya Insani who gave substance for Leadership Training to scholars to remind them that their potential skills can be optimized, forming a positive mental attitude and strong morale and a spirit of healthy competition within the scholars. The final step was to interview 11 people, five of whom represented the Technical Office (TO) USAID. These people were selected based on an internal review by the team of PRESTASI IIEF by weighing factors such as being actively involved in the decision making process in the mid-to-upper level of institutions/organizations, both at the provincial and national levels; providing INTRODUCTION 55
  • 6. services to the community and being voluntarily committed to implementing new ideas and services to the wider community; having achieved excellent results from institutions/organizations at the provincial, national and interna- tional levels; making changes in the institution/organization by providing ideas, knowledge and new skills; excelling in their career/professions such as by get- ting a promotion and/or grades; being actively involved in representing the institution/ organization at provincial, national and international levels; gaining new skills and knowledge which has been recognized by the institution/organi- zation (such as gaining extra responsibility within work) and being recognized by their peers and the community as a leader in their field. In order to obtain impartial information and avoid making any over claims, we also interviewed their principals or supervisors in the institutions in which they work as well as some of their colleagues to assess the changes and the impact they felt after PRESTASI Alumni returned to their homeland. We got a lot of answers from these alumni stories, including the stories of their struggles on and off campus during their study in the United States and some fragments of their stories about after they returned to take part in their respective fields upon their return to Indonesia. A series of these interesting stories can be found in sub-section ‘ALPHA I Already Rocking Step’. We believe that one person can make a difference but a group of people can make an impact. Hopefully PRESTASI: A Journey can provide a comprehensive review of this scholarship program. Jakarta, September 2012 Mira Sambada Chief of Party PRESTASI Graduate Scholarship 66 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 7. PRESTASI OVERVIEW The word “prestasi”, according to the Indonesian Dictionary (KBBI), means: achievements. When used as a verb with “high” to “outstanding” the meaning is: having achievements in a case. However, PRESTASI, which is the name of the scholarship program from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is not a direct translation from Indonesian. PRESTASI is an abbreviation of the Program to Extend Scholarships and Training to Achieve Sustainable Impacts, which roughly means “Scholarship Program for Study and Training to Obtain a Sustainable Impact”. In some programs supported by USAID in Indonesia, the U.S. government tends to use abbreviations that also have meanings in Indonesian. So by calling the program PRESTASI, which already has meaning and is very popular in the Indonesian language the program is more easily recognized and remembered in the minds of Indonesian people. USAID launched PRESTASI Scholarship program in April 2011 as a continuation of the Human and Institutional Capacity Development (HICD) program, aiming to improve the leadership skills and performance of Indonesian professionals, which will benefit the development of Indonesia. PRESTASI will strengthen and expand the skill base of professionals and institutions in Indonesia, both in the public sector, Civil Society Organization (CSO), or private sector. Through this program, hundreds of Indonesian people have had the opportunity for education, both short-term and for Masters and Doctoral degrees, in the United States, Indonesia and other countries. PRESTASI focuses on the subject areas of Education, Health, Environment, Economics Growth and Democratic Governance. PRESTASI is open to all Indonesian undergraduates who are eligible for Masters and Doctoral degrees while the requirement of participants for short-term training programs is modified according to their respective areas of training. The name PRESTASI is similar to a number of other programs, which are also conducted in Indonesia. In order to avoid confusion it is necessary to brand the program therefore it is better known as USAID PRESTASI. Since April 2011 USAID entrusted the implementation of the PRESTASI program to Indonesian International Education Foundation (IIEF). IIEF is a local organization from Indonesia working in partnership with the 77 A GLANCE AT PRESTASI
  • 8. Institute of International Education (IIE), an international organization based in New York and Washington DC, which is one of the most experienced private, non-profit educational organizations in the world. The scholarship program was initially handled by another imple- menter/contractor, under a pro- gram titled FORECAST-HICD (Human and Institutional Capacity Development). The project was transferred to IIEF after the FORECAST program came to an end. USAID used his or her own judgment when selecting an Indonesian contractor to work on this program. “When USAID asked, we had to submit a proposal,” said Mira Sambada, Chief of Party (COP) PRESTASI. IIEF revised its proposal several times, especially in relation to the budget. “The main challenge in this process was because the program was in the transition period from the previous contractor where all scholars under the previous program management transferred to IIEF. To compile a budget for a program that has already been running is a greater challenge than designing a budget from the start,” said Mira. According to Mira Sambada, under PRESTASI the scholarship program offers scholarships for master’s degrees and is open for all Indonesian undergraduates. Of course, there are minimum requirements that must be possessed by the candidates, they must have a TOEFL®ITP score of at least 450 or English language proficiency test results equivalent to the TOEFL®ITP, TOEFL®iBT or IELTS, they must have a spirit of leadership, good academic achievements in a field of study that is relevant to the development objectives of USAID and the Government of Indonesia, and they must be eligible to undergo education or advanced training. The PRESTASI Representative Program Manager ensures that the scholarship applicants are treated equally through a fair selection process. The selection process involves a series or stages that have been agreed between IIEF as the program organizer and USAID as the donor. This means that the determination of the candidates who are eligible to receive the scholarship will be made through a tiered selection of mechanisms starting from document review where IIEF team will check the administrative completeness of applicant’s documents and eligibility of the documents as the requirement specify. This is followed by criteria review, which is conducted by an independent appraisal panel with high integrity that is recruited from a variety of backgrounds and areas of expertise. Next there is a regional face-to-face interview to filter out 88 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY GRAFIK 1 Sumber: IIEF-PRESTASI Data Summary Description of PRESTASI Scholars (2007 - 2012)
  • 9. the best candidates from the region to compete at national level. The final determination or final decision is made by a team from USAID. “This selection process is undertaken for transparency and fairness. Thus, there is no room for collusion,” said Mira, who has a degree in psychology from the University of Indonesia. Mira, a mother of three children, explained that those who were selected were appropriate figures. Of course, besides having academic requirements or good English proficiency, it is also important is to have integrity, especially those who have a concern for the community. “Concern for the community can be reflected through the activities of certain institutions or organization created to develop the community. This is important since the purpose of this program is to make the recipients become leaders in this field,” said Mira. Due to the nature of the PRESTASI program the program management - starting from information dissemination to capture the interest of applicants to scholars finishing their studies and graduated - was conducted by USAID and IIEF in a special way. IIEF perform a series of processes: first, the dissemination of information to capture the interest of applicants and to select candidates; second, arranging training for scholars before departing to the U.S., finding the appropriate universities, and monitoring during their studies; third, monitoring the progress of the PRESTASI alumni in institutions in which they work and in the community. So, arguably, PRESTASI Scholarship is an integrated and sustainable program, in accordance with its meaning. ACHIEVERS OF PRESTASI Based on the results of recruitment in 2012 for the year 2013 there were 39 PRESTASI Scholarship recipients. 30 out of the 39 PRESTASI recipients will study master’s degrees in the United States and nine will study in Indonesia. However, there are two people who withdrew because they also received scholarships from other institutions. From a total of 37 people from the selection process 54% of participants were women. Outcomes showed that IIEF surpassed the targets required by USAID to recruit 50% women as recipients of the PRESTASI scholarship program. In addition, the geographical composition of the PRESTASI scholars was in line with USAID expectations to give more attention to candidates from Central and Eastern Indonesia. 64% of PRESTASI scholars come 99 GRAFIK 2 Sumber: IIEF-PRESTASI Data Description of PRESTASI Long Term Training Scholars Based on Age (2007 - 2012)
  • 10. from outside Java, and 36% were from Java. The employment backgrounds of the 37 PRESTASI scholars were varied consisting of: 33% civil servants, 31% teachers and lecturers, 15% NGO, 8% private or public institutions, 8% research institutions and 5% journalists and media. The number of scholarship recipients for 2013 adds to a long list of PRESTASI scholarship recipients. In the period 2007 - 2012, including the program HICD (Human and Institutional Capacity Development), there are already 192 people who have been given scholarships to study Masters or Doctorates. 166 of these people went on to study in the United States and 26 people took graduate courses in Indonesia. Of the166 people who studied in the United States 77 of them have earned a Master’s degree and are already alumni of PRESTASI. The average age of the scholars was also shifted significantly when comparing the HICD program to PRESTASI program. When HICD operated the program the age range was more diverse but PRESTASI scholars were dominated by the younger generation. From the data compiled by IIEF in the year 2007 - 2010 age composition comprised 8% of scholars aged 41-50 years, 53% aged 31-40 years, and 39% in the range of 21-30 years. While for 2011 zero percent of scholars were aged 41-50 years, 4% aged 31-40 years and 96% were aged 21-30 years. In 2012 there was no scholars aged 41-50 years, 30% were aged 31-40 years and 70% were aged 21-30 years. The data shows that the PRESTASI program has attracted the attention of Indonesian young professionals. This trend has positive implications for PRESTASI scholars, institutions, and the State of Indonesia in general because it is assumed the alumni will have a longer time to contribute their best to strengthen their home institution in which they work and contribute positively to the country as well. Composition of the number of recipients by region of origin (geographical) has also changed from year to year. During HICD program from 2007-2010, 36% of scholars were from outside Java. However, since 2011 this composition has shifted and there has been a very sharp increase in the number of scholars from outside Java from 36% - 57%, which means an increase of 28%. In 2012, that figure increased again to 68%. The increase in the number of scholars who reside outside Java is in line with the focus of the five Technical Office (TO) of USAID to give greater attention to the target areas outside Java and it is in accordance with the core 1100 GRAFIK 3 PRESTASI Scholars Long TermTraining – Geographic Representatives (2007 – 2012) Sumber: IIEF-PRESTASI Data PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 11. objectives PRESTASI which want to give more attention to areas that are under-represented. The gender of scholars continues to fluctuate from year to year but there are a number of female recruits - well above the target of gender equality required by USAID of 50:50 compositions, i.e., the period of recruitment in January - March 2011. Within four years of the program HICD in year 2007-2010, total female scholars were 44% of the number of selected participants throughout the program. However, since the PRESTASI program held in April 2011 the trend of the number of women who received scholarships showed an increase from the required target of USAID. From the results of the HICD recruitment program in early 2011 the number of female scholars was 74% that derived from two dropouts in USAID, Health and Environment. While in 2012 the number of female scholars reached 54% from recruitment to five DO. However, this latter figure is still above 50% percent of the mandate given by USAID to IIEF through PRESTASI. 1111 GRAFIK 4 Sumber: IIEF-PRESTASI Data PRESTASI Scholars Long Term Training – Gender Representatives (2007 – 2012)
  • 12. OUTREACH REACHING OUT OVER THE COUNTRY To get the best young Indonesians to be awarded postgraduate scholarships, PRESTASI IIEF team uses the technique of “jemput bola” or pick up the balls. IIEF do not simply rely on websites, direct mail, social networking, and advertising in the mass media to recruit candidates for the scholarship recipients, but the team from PRESTASI IIEF went straight out to potential cities in various parts of Indonesia to “pick” them. 1122 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY OUTREACH AND SELECTION PRESTASI’s Booth in U.S Higher Education Fair FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 13. This strategy is preceded by mapping with records and by conducting preliminary research to observe any city to be visited. The IIEF team must move quickly to perform comprehensive mapping and to make contact with the contact person in the area, either through the local government (LG), alumni HICD program and other scholarship programs that have and are being managed by IIEF and trustees of the Civil Society Organization (CSO) or community organizations in the target areas defined by five Technical Office (TO) USAID has prepared budgets for: TO Education, Democratic Governance, Economic Growth, Health and Environment. Visiting target cities is very important because the area of Indonesia is so vast and there is an inequality of access to information. People who live in big cities such as Jakarta and Surabaya certainly have much easier access to information than, for example, people living in Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan or in Kupang (West Timor). Due to these conditions the PRESTASI team presents in targeted cities so that the potential field of candidates in all regions have the same opportunities to obtain information, along with their colleagues just as well as those in Jakarta and other big cities. In addition, the PRESTASI team needs to go to certain cities in the central and eastern part of Indonesia because USAID pays special attention to these regions. Through the PRESTASI program, says Mira, USAID wants to encourage the growth of quality professionals in Central and Eastern Indonesia regions to keep pace with their counterparts in the western part of Java in particular. To disseminate information and recruit the best undergraduate applicants in 2013 the PRESTASI team visited 12 cities from Sumatra to Papua. In each city the PRESTASI team visited targeted places such as universities, offices, NGOs, and local government. Presentations in these areas began in early September 2011 with Medan as the first location. Overall the PRESTASI team visited 54 places and events, which totaled more than 1,000 visitors. Arguably, presentations in certain areas were more of a success and the visitors 1133 On-site presentation in Ministry of National Education Office - South Sulawesi FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI On-site presentation in Papua State University (UNIPA) Manokwari.
  • 14. were very keen to know more about the PRESTASI program. The PRESTASI team gained many unexpected and impressive results during the “pick up the ball” strategy in those areas. One was the enthusiasm shown by the mass media in Makassar, the Tribune East. This paper preached about the PRESTASI Team in the city. Complimentary coverage was also made by Kartika Magazine (September 2011 issue) and even the English language edition newspaper the Jakarta Globe gave free advertising space for PRESTASI on September 16, 2011. Another way IIEF spread the information regarding PRESTASI was to participate in Education exhibitions. In the U.S. Higher Education Fair held on October 5, 1144 Participants Attended On-Site Presentation Based on Type of Employment NO. VENUE ACTIVITY ADDRESS CITY DATE 1. Fakultas Ekonomi USU Courtesy Call Jln. Prof.T.M. Hanafiah, SH Kampus USU Medan 07-Sep-11 2. Gd. Pengadilan Semu FH USU Presentation Jl. Universitas No 4, Kampus USU Medan 08-Sep-11 3. Univ. Pembangunan Panca Budi Presentation Jl Gatot Subroto Km 4,5 Medan 08-Sep-11 4. Yayasan PKPA Presentation Simpang Selayang Kec. Medan Tuntungan Medan 09-Sep-11 5. YPPIA Presentation Jalan Dr. Mansyur Medan 09-Sep-11 6. BAPPEDA Gorontalo Courtesy Call Jl. Bukit Botu Gorontalo Gorontalo 13-Sep-11 7. Kantor Program Teluk Tomini / SUSCLAM Presentation Jl. Makassar No. 40 Gorontalo 13-Sep-11 8. Pusat Bahasa Univ. Negeri Gorontalo Presentation Jl. Jend. Sudirman No. 6 Gorontalo 14-Sep-11 9. Univ. Hasanuddin Presentation Tamalarea Makassar 15-Sep-11 10. UIN Alauddin Presentation Jl Sultan Alauddin Makassar 15-Sep-11 11. Dinas Pendidikan Prov. Sulawesi Selatan Presentation Jl. Perintis Kemerdekaan Tamalanrea Makassar 16-Sep-11 12. Kantor Koran Fajar Makassar Courtesy Call Gd. Graha Pena Makassar Makassar 16-Sep-11 13. Kerjasama Internasional UNDANA Courtesy Call Hotel Kristal Kupang Kupang 19-Sep-11 14. Kantor Ketua Politeknik Pertanian Negeri Kupang Courtesy Call Politeknik Pertanian Negeri Kupang Kupang 20-Sep-11 15. Politeknik Pertanian Negeri Kupang Presentation Jl. Adisucipto, Penfui Kupang 20-Sep-11 16. Yayasan Bunda Purnama Kasih Presentation Penfui Kupang 20-Sep-11 17. Univ. Nusa Cendana Presentation Jalan Adisucipto Penfui Kupang 21-Sep-11 18. BAPPEDA Provinsi NTB Courtesy Call JL. Flamboyan No. 2 Mataram 22-Sep-11 19. Ruang Pela Perado BAPPEDA Provinsi NTB Presentation JL. Flamboyan No. 2 Mataram 22-Sep-11 20. Kantor Koran Lombok Pos Courtesy Call Jl. Tgh. Faisal No. 33 Mataram 22-Sep-11 21. Univ. Mataram Presentation Jl. Majapahit No. 62 Mataram 23-Sep-11 22. Kantor Pembantu Rektor IV UNIPA Courtesy Call Jl. Gunung Salju Manokwari 26-Sep-11 23. Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Hukum Manokwari Courtesy Call Jalan Karya ABRI No 2 Manokwari 26-Sep-11 24. Sekolah Tinggi Ilmu Ekonomi Mah Eisa Courtesy Call Jalan Lembah Hijau Diklat Manokwari 26-Sep-11 25. Kantor Koran Cahaya Papua Courtesy Call Jl. Pertanian Manokwari 26-Sep-11 26. Kantor Koran Media Papua Courtesy Call Jl. Gunung Salju Manokwari 26-Sep-11 27. UPT Pelayanan Bahasa UNIPA Presentation Jl. Gunung Salju Amban Manokwari 27-Sep-11 28. STKIP Muhammadiyah Presentation Jl. S. Condronegoro Manokwari 27-Sep-11 29. Kantor Tribun Institute Presentation Jl. Purnama Pontianak 10-Oct-11 30. BAPPEDA Provinsi Kalbar Courtesy Call Jl. Ahmad Yani Pontianak 11-Oct-11 31. BAPPEDA Provinsi Kalbar Courtesy Call Jl. Ahmad Yani Pontianak 11-Oct-11 32. WWF Pontianak Presentation Jl. Husada Pontianak 11-Oct-11 33. Rektorat Univ. Tanjung Pura Courtesy Call Jl. Ahmad Yani Pontianak 12-Oct-11 34. Univ. Tanjung Pura Presentation Jl. Ahmad Yani Pontianak 12-Oct-11 35. FISIP Univ. Pembangunan Nasional Veteran Presentation Condongcatur, Depok, Sleman Yogyakarta 17-Oct-11 36. Purek III Univ. Pembangunan Nasional Veteran Courtesy Call Condongcatur, Depok, Sleman Yogyakarta 17-Oct-11 37. Biro Kerjasama Internasional UGM Courtesy Call Bulaksumur Yogyakarta 18-Oct-11 38. Balaikota Yogyakarta Presentation Jl. Kenari Yogyakarta 18-Oct-11 39. Lembaga Ombudsman Daerah Presentation Jln. Tentara Pelajar No. 1A Pingit Kidul Yogyakarta 18-Oct-11 40. Fakultas Pertanian UGM Courtesy Call Bulaksumur Yogyakarta 19-Oct-11 41. American Corner Univ. Muhammadiyah Presentation Jl. Lingkar Barat, Tamantirto, Kasihan Yogyakarta 19-Oct-11 42. Rektorat Univ. Syiah Kuala Courtesy Call Darussalam Banda Aceh 20-Oct-11 43. Hotel Hemes Palace Courtesy Call Tgk. Nyak Makam Banda Aceh 20-Oct-11 44. FKIP Univ. Syiah Kuala Presentation Darussalam Banda Aceh 21-Oct-11 45. Aula Kantor Walikota Banda Aceh Presentation Jl. Tgk. Abu Lam U Banda Aceh 21-Oct-11 46. Rektorat Univ. Malikussaleh Courtesy Call Uteun Kot - Cunda Lhokseumawe 22-Oct-11 47. Gedung ACC Univ. Malikussaleh Presentation Uteun Kot - Cunda Lhokseumawe 22-Oct-11 48. Univ. Sebelas Maret Presentation Jl. Ir. Sutami Surakarta 25-Oct-11 49. STAIN Surakarta Presentation Jl. Pandawa Pucangan Kartasura Surakarta 25-Oct-11 50. STAIN Salatiga Presentation Jl. Stadion Salatiga 26-Oct-11 51. International Scholarship and Education Expo Presentation IPB, Dramaga Bogor Bogor 9-Oct-11 52. USAID: 50th Anniversary Presentation @america, Pacific Place Jakarta 12-Oct-11 53. U.S. Higher Education Presentation Hotel Kartika Chandra Jakarta 5-Oct-11 54. Auditorium Balai Pengawasan Obat & Makanan Presentation BPOM Jl. Percetakan Negara Jakarta 29-Oct-11 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY On-Site Presentation Based on Location and Venue Sumber: IIEF-PRESTASI Data Sumber: IIEF-PRESTASI Data
  • 15. 2011 the PRESTASI booth was visit- ed by 1,300 visitors. In October 2011 PRESTASI also participated in the IPB Education Expo. In addition IIEF also participated in a number of exhibitions at the invitation of USAID Indonesia. The latest exhibition, which IIEF participated in, was the EdUSA Spring Fair held in Jakarta, Medan and Surabaya. The result of the disclosure of such information was an overwhelming response. The PRESTASI team got 1.305 applications from various parts of Indonesia, which reflects the enthu- siasm of Indonesian young people to achieve advanced education. “It really illustrates that Indonesia needs scholarships in large quanti- ties. The lesson for us in IIEF was that prospective applicants attempted to go directly to the face- to-face presentations to make it easier for them to dig up as much information as possible to get a scholarship out of the country,” said Mira Sambada. 1155 T he Division of Outreach and Selection is responsible for visiting the target areas. The Division is fronted by Wahono Kolopaking and Ratri Pratiwi, who had to use a variety of tactics to build public awareness about the PRESTASI scholarship program and to gain public interest in the program. One of the strategies is to go to potential remote areas. A lot of unique things happened to Wahono Kolopaking, PRESTASI Outreach and Selection Specialist, who is fondly called Nano - when socializing in these areas. One of the memories that left a lasting impression on Nano was when he visited Aceh with Hanif Saleh, Contracting Officer’s Representative (COR) USAID. In the Tanah Rencong they had an agenda to socialize in Banda Aceh and Lhokseumawe. They were so excited to visit the two cities. Nano thought that they could go to Lhokseumawe having completed the PRESTASI socialization agenda and return to Banda Aceh to catch an afternoon flight that will take them both back to Jakarta. However, due to having to travel a very winding road up and down hills and several roads between cities being in bad condition, plus drizzle during the SOCIALIZATION COMBINED WITH COWS: EXPERIENCE IN ACEH FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 16. 1166 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY OPTIMIZATION OF WEBSITE AND SOCIAL MEDIA In the era of the Internet and the rise of social media in Indonesia today the dissemination of information about the program through cyberspace is important for the PRESTASI Outreach team to support face-to-face visits in the various regions. The PRESTASI team designed a website and uploaded allimportant documents in to the website address at www.prestasi-iief.org. Every prospective applicant can access the application form on the PRESTASI website. To be more interactive PRESTASI also designed a Facebook Fan Page and Twitter in order to provide updated information. With Indonesia’s position as one of the biggest users of social media in the world dissemination of information through a virtual media proved to be very effective, cheap and fast. The existence of these two accounts also contributes significantly to the spread of information of PRESTASI program. Based on data compiled by IIEF, in the peak period of the outreach’s implementation, as per October 25, 2011 it was recorded trip their rented car could not go very fast. “If we were at a normal speed it might be that. Hanif and I would miss the plane,” Nano said. Because of that, he whispered to the driver to drive as fast as pos- sible so they can get back to Jakarta that night. As a result, for about five hours the car drove like crazy while both passengers –Nano and Hanif – sat silently and were busy praying in their heart. “We do not have time to eat - just stop for a moment to pray and then we go directly off again,” said Nano as he tells how they hunt the time. Unfortunately the driver hit the gas very hard and on the last corner before entering the city of Banda Aceh a cow sud- denly appeared and inevitably the car hit the poor cow. All of the passengers were shocked and for a moment could not speak. Finally the car arrived at the airport in Banda Aceh, on time, and they could catch a plane back to Jakarta that night. Hanif, who looked a little pale, told Nano, “Mas Wahono ... please do not be like this on the next journey ... It’s better to miss the aircraft rather than to lose our lives.” Hanif’s words could only be rewarded with a smile and an apology from Nano. In fact, Nano was as worried as Hanif but at least one more task from the Outreach team list was completed. Well done! PRESTASI’s Facebook FOTOOLEH:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 17. 1177 O ne interesting story concerned with how PRESTASI information live in cyberspace could reach potential candidates in remote areas of the archipelago was narrated by David Kuntel, a PRESTASI scholar who was chosen from the field of Environment from the 2012 recruitment. David was born in Manado, North Sulawesi on December 23 1984. After completing his bachelor degree at Sam Ratulangi University Faculty of Fisheries (UNSRAT), Manado David went to work as administrative staff and assistant for professor at UNSRAT but early in 2009 he decided to join the Local Government of Siau Tagulandang Biaro (Sitaro) Island, a new district that split from Sangihe Island in 2007, which is a seven-hour ride boat from Manado. Serving on a small island, surrounded by the Molucca Sea on the east and the Celebes Sea on the west, with telecommunication signals up and down did not dampen David’s spirits and he still managed to hunt for information about scholarships. David relied on the Internet to find information about various scholarship pro- grams, which would enable him to continue his study to a master’s degree. One day in October 2011 when browsing on his mobile phone David found information about PRESTASI, “this is the first info I got from the phone,” said David. David immediately prepared all of the required documents and sent them to IIEF in Jakarta. It turned out that the application managed to attract the attention of the selection team and he was invited to attend an interview session in the Makassar region. David took a ship to Siau Island followed by a small plane to Manado and finally Makassar. And luck is haven for people who work hard! After passing a series of rigorous selection criteria David managed to rise above thousands of other candidates and he became one of the PRESTASI scholars. “Through PRESTASI I hope my dream will come true which is to study at the School of Marine Affairs at the University of Washington,” says David who is now following the Pre-Academic Training (PAT) in Jakarta along with 30 of other scholars who were recruited in 2012. PRESTASI FINALLY DROP IN SIAU TAGULANDANG BIARO that there were 1.469 active participants on the PRESTASI Facebook account and 685 followers on the PRESTASI twitter account with 300 updates since the account was launched on June 28, 2011. Until the end of September 2012, PRESTASI Twitter followers have netted 1.610 and 1.209 Twitter friends as many as 3.167 people clicked “like-button” for the PRESTASI Facebook Fan Page. FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 18. THREE PLUS ONE: THE POWERFUL SUPPLIES Having selected the best of Indonesia’s children for the PRESTASI Scholarships it’s time for the participants elected to get prepared before leaving for advanced studying in the United States. There are three main types of materials: English language training materials, leadership materials, and statistics materials. Candidates also have a debriefing and a Pre-Departure Orientation, which is very important because most PRESTASI scholarship program awardees have never travelled abroad. Why is three plus one given? Here’s the explanation. TRAINING AND MONITORING 3399 FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Scholars attended English Language Training seriously
  • 19. ENGLISH LANGUAGE TRAINING (ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES / EAP) English Language Training is very important to improve the scholarship awardees’ English language skills so that the scholars have no significant barriers in studying and communicating in the United States. Having the ability to communicate in English will certainly make the awardees adapt more easily to their new environment and it will make it easier for them to absorb the knowledge that they learn. Why is the English language training needed? It is related to the mission of the PRESTASI program to provide more opportunities for those who have limited access to achieve higher education. English language skills are not the main criteria for PRESTASI scholarship awardees but academic competence, nationalism, as well as his/her enthusiasm to move forward and fight for other people are considered priority. This is what distinguishes the PRESTASI program scholarship. However, it does remain that there is a minimum requirement of English language skills; Candidates must have a TOEFL®ITP score of 450 or equivalent. “That’s the excellence of the PRESTASI program. Those whose English is not good enough can still submit their application,” said Wiwin Erikawati, Training and Monitoring Division Manager of PRESTASI, who handles the division with Hafida Meutia, excitedly. Wiwin said that the students in eastern part of Indonesia have good academic potential but their English is not so good. It may be caused by the lack of access to English training. There are not as many English courses in Papua there are in Jakarta also they are very expensive. In fact some applicants from Papua are excellent academically and intellectually smart. “It’s unfair that just because of their poor English they lose the opportunity to get the scholarship. So, this program accommodates people with limited access,” added Wiwin. That is why English debriefing is definitely needed. “Many participants are not good at English so we prepared a particular design of English briefing. The program is in line with the participants’ level of English skills,” she said in IIEF office in Kuningan, Jakarta. The PRESTASI participants were enrolled in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) for either a month, four months or six months at the International Language Institute University of Indonesia (LBI-UI) in Salemba, Central Jakarta. The duration of the training is in accordance with the placement test result conducted by a team of LBI-UI. The candidates all come from their respective regions to Jakarta for the training. They could be sent to English courses in their own region too, for example participants from Makassar could be enrolled in English Courses in Makassar and monitored. However, since the target to be achieved through the EAP is very specific in helping scholars improve their English competency for academic purposes, IIEF with LBI-UI design a specific program (tailor made) so that the target can be achieved within a maximum period of six months. In addition, if the group learns together there is healthy competition in the group so the achievement process can also be accelerated. Wiwin said, “The purpose of bringing them all to Jakarta is to form a system of positive competition. It is more costly. We cover not only the cost of the course, we also provide for their living costs while in Jakarta.” It turned out that the goal could be achieved very effectively. For example, participants with the lowest grades at the previous test were motivated for the course since they have to compete against the group. “The arousal of competition was very interesting. We gather people with the same mission so 4400 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 20. they may compete positively to get a high score. High scores certainly have a good impact and they could find schools more easily,” said Wiwin about the plus point of the tailor made programs of EAP IIEF- LBI UI. Three Classes Before the training begins, LBI UI map the English participants’ competency through preliminary tests. From this they know where to place each participant and it provides a reference for making and designing the training program, for the English language skills of each participant are different. Sisilia explained that although there are only a few participants it is impossible to put them in one group from the beginning of the training because of the various levels of their language skills. Dividing the participants according to their competency is much more effective. “We usually divide them into three classes. The first class has 120 hours of learning and this is for 4411 IIEFtook International Language Institute University of Indonesia (LBI-UI) to provide training to USAID PRESTASI awardees before heading to the United States to gain knowledge. LBI-UI is a language institution that concentrates on training seven world languages, namely English, Mandarin, Japanese, French, German, Dutch and Arabic. This institution was founded and fostered by the alumni of the Faculty of Humanities (FIB) UI. The training process of the PRESTASI participants is held in FIB UI Salemba, Central Jakarta. The teachers are the lecturers of FIB UI who are certainly capable in their fields. “Intensive learning every day,” said Sisilia Halimi, who served as Director of LBI UI during the program. The alumnus of La Trobe University, Melbourne Victory Australia, played an important role and became the partner of IIEF in designing specific programs and developed a module to learn English for the participants of the PRESTASI program. LBI-UI does not want any participants who failed for lack of English language skills to go to college in America because it can damage their reputation. “Our commitment is to have as many participants as possible to be able to achieve the needed requirements to be accepted at a university,” said Sisilia who specializes in Applied Linguistics for English Language Teaching. SISILIA SETIAWATI HALIMI, PHD LLeeccttuurreerr SSeenniioorr LLeeccttuurreerr DDeeppaarrttmmeenntt ooff EEnngglliisshh LLaanngguuaaggee SSttuuddiieess PPrrooggrraamm aanndd PPoosstt GGrraadduuaattee LLiinngguuiissttiiccss,, FFIIBB UUII They Are Taking Learning Very Seriously English Language Training conducted intensively everyday FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 21. those who already have TOEFL®ITP 500’s. The second class is for 450 hours and is for the average competency. The third class is for 630 hours for those with a low grade of TOEFL®ITP, “she said. According to her the first class’s training focuses on English for academic purposes. At this level the participants are allowed to take the TOEFL®iBT that will be submitted as a condition of enrollment into the target college. As their language skills are no longer to be worried about Sisilia said, “There is special material for them.” Meanwhile, the two other classes are more focused on speaking and writing. “Of course the material is different, although the class will eventually be in the same level.” Although divided into several classes the teaching mechanism which is applied to all levels tends to be the same, namely communication language. Sisilia said it is to ensure that participants do not only learn about the language but it is also to ensure that they can use the language to communicate. LBI-UI has experience of 4422 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY P RESTASI Scholarship Awardees also get academic aptitude packages, one of which is SPSS. The statistical package is taught with computer software, which makes it fun for the participants and easy to understand without awardees being traumatized by numbers. Before flying to the United States the PRESTASI Scholarship recipients first get a foothold. Besides money, the most important foothold is non- material forms of English, Statistics, and Leadership. The three main materials were provided through training; each handled by a different team of trainers and teachers. For statistical training participants are trained in the Institute for Research and Community Service (LPPM) Atma Jaya Catholic University Jakarta, for three days from morning to evening. They learn SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences). The mentors are Dr. Ir. Heru Prasadja, M.Sc and Drs. Herry Pramono, M.Sc. As a lecturer of statistics at the university since 1985, Heru Prasadja has understood that his courses were considered frightening for some students. So when he was in front of the trainees from PRESTASI, who have a variety of science backgrounds. Heru was prepared with the understanding that he had a strategy and that the Awardees were not afraid of learning statistics. Heru did not directly teach the science of statistics but he built on the participants’ motivation to get to know statistics. During the participants debriefing Heru analogized that statistical learning is like a boy learning to ride a bike. At the beginning the child often falls and is even scolded by his parents. However, with all his effort the boy can finally ride a bike. “Just like learning statistics. I motivate them by telling them that you learn this now for you will need it and use it later. It is not just about simply passing a statistics course,” said Heru, who holds a doctorate in sociology from the University of Indonesia. DR. IR. HERU PRASADJA, M.SC EExxppeerrttss aanndd LLeeccttuurreerrss SSPPSSSS SSttaattiissttiiccss UUnniikkaa AAttmmaa JJaayyaa,, JJaakkaarrttaa A Foothold in Working on Numbers
  • 22. providing language training for various groups ranging from government departments, non- governmental organizations (NGOs), scholarship recipients who will go out of the country and so on. For the group of scholarship recipients who departed in 2012 this was the first year for PRESTASI working with LBI-UI. “My impression for those who departed in 2012 was very positive. They seemed very serious. I believe this selection was unbelievably good. They learned seriously. Their potential can be maximized. Their learning attitude is very positive with high motivation,” said Sisilia. Seeing the seriousness of the participants Sisilia assumed the participants were well qualified. She hopes the participants are able to complete their studies well then return to Indonesia to develop and apply their knowledge. “They’re the ones who are well-qualified. If they can contribute their knowledge to our country it will be a better country,” said the senior lecturer in the Department of English Language Studies Program and Post Graduate Linguistics, FIB UI. 4433 Besides the motivating touches, Heru and Herry used the method of “friendship”. The brief- ing was for participants who didn’t understand statistics so they approached them by a chat, which was not directly related to statistics. This created a good atmosphere in transferring the science. “Since the first day I invited them to talk and tried to encourage them. I do not want to push them, I am afraid they will be traumatized by numbers,” he added. Heru and Herry composed the easy to understand method of teaching from a variety of knowledge backgrounds. First they emphasize understanding the meaning of symbols and formulas that look complicated then they step up to numerical problems. By explaining the meaning of the symbols and formulas clearly before processing the data, Heru and his colleagues hope to hone the participants’ logic. Formulas are not considered terrible anymore but they are recognized as an instrument that makes research easier. They ensure accurate data processing. Heru wants students to understand that statistics can be understood with the right logic and not just by memorizing formulas and counting. “Then we discus the method, how to use and how to process it, so the formulas are proven to ease the process of our research,” he added. Did it work? “At least the participants did not complain and they enjoyed learning the formulas,” he said, laughing. At the end of the debriefing Heru was just amazed. All participants were enthusiastic about the training from morning to evening. Heru and Herry were bombarded with a variety of questions. Starting from questions that required discussion with the questioner to the questions that required the basic principles of statistics to be re-explained. “I was comforted by their enthusiasm. Perhaps those who haven’t learned statistics before got a new piece of knowledge, while the ones have the knowledge could refresh their memory,” said Heru. Based on the experience of debriefing in July 2012 Heru suggested the next briefing is better divided into two classes based on the participants’ competency. The scholarship candidates who seem to take majors that rely on qualitative logical thinking such as anthropology should be better able to understand training method according to the field. “For some whose majors are in qualitative studies they are not required to study statistics. Pity them,” he added.
  • 23. STATISTICS TRAINING The second provision the participants get is statistics training. The participants are trained in the Institute for Research and Community Service (LPPM) Atma Jaya Catholic University Jakarta, for three days from morning to evening. They learn SPSS or Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The mentor is Heru Prasadja and Herry Pramono who both wrestle with statistics day-to-day. IIEF has a special reason why the very specific provision needs to be given to PRESTASI scholarship awardees. “Statistics is important to assist them in researching and in data processing,” Wiwin explained. Most importantly statistics teach a logical way of thinking. It’s clearly fundamental since they will have to be able to produce scientific papers and the real work is built on correct and appropriate reasoning. LEADERSHIP TRAINING The next provision is leadership training. Unlike the EAP, which took six months, the training was held for one night and two days in D’Agape Residence, in Ciawi, Bogor, West Java, in early December 2011. For this leadership training IIEF worked in cooperation with PT Daya Insani (www.dayainsani.com), a training provider that has the expertise and experience in leadership training including the training of human resources who will continue their studies to a higher level both domestically and abroad. The company which is managed by a couple of psychologists, alumnus of the University of Indonesia (UI), Sri Hastari Biran and Zainul Biran is engaged in the field of services to help organizations and individuals to identify, uncover, develop and optimize the potential of the individual in the workplace and in social daily life. For one night and two days the PRESTASI participants, who are all from different backgrounds and regions - Jakarta, Jambi, Papua, Central Java, East Java, and others - do various activities as a group that can reveal the character and the potential of each person. “During the leadership training their personalities come out. For 4444 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Hand stamps and Expectations of scholars Christian, Rina and Since actively involved in in-door activity in Leadership Training
  • 24. example, A who seems calm turns out to be very ambitious. There are games in the course, which shows that A justified the means for him/her to succeed. So, his/her real character has come out,” said Wiwin laughing, “I’m excited to see it.” As well as being able to reveal the character and potential of each participant leadership training also gives a variety of dynamic group games that create the feeling of binding togetherness. “The training succeeded in making them feel the same. The training provider made them feel equal so after the leadership training no one looks down on other people or otherwise assumes others are higher. Togetherness was successfully created during the leadership training,” said Wiwin. 4455 FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Out-door activity to foster cooperation in team Cooperation of a team in an out-door activity
  • 25. F or the leadership training for the PRESTASI participants IIEF works in cooperation with PT Daya Insani, which has much experience in this field. “At the beginning of training we invite participants to sing Indonesia Raya in order that they have a sense of responsibility for the country,” said Director of PT Daya Insani, Sri Hastari Z Biran as she talks about the training process that lasts for two days and one night. It is not without reason that the opening of training starts with the national anthem. In many cases people go abroad to study but then they do not return home. Some return home but bring their life from abroad home too so they lose Indonesia. Therefore this training, she said, meant that the Indonesian people should have a commitment to Indonesia. The process towards the realization is done with the various training activities that seem “trivial”. For instance, there is a rule requiring all participants turn off their cellular phone during activity sessions and there is the rule that participants should be on time. The rule raises pros and cons among the participants. There were participants who protested and there were participants that accepted the rules. When the session started on time there were some participants who were not already in the place. The session was postponed until all participants were present. This method also caused debate among participants. From the spontaneous reactions from the participants the coaches of Daya Insani gain input on the character or nature of each participant. Then the trainer asked participants to take time to self-reflect on their attitudes. An understanding of the personal character of each is also obtained by using some short tests. “I’m oh so, so ... my friend,” the UI Psychology alumnus described the reaction of the participants after taking the test, and an explanation of the meaning of the test. Awareness of self-character and leadership abilities and togetherness were also built through various activities or simulations. One is through the sharing of the work environment or the bureaucracy of each and their role in that environment. This type of sharing can help to reflect the role they should contribute to create a better environment. Leadership and a sense of togetherness were raised and built through games that seemed trivial. Through outbound activities such as a number of outdoor games participants are invited to reflect on the meaning of that game. The core lesson of the game is that if you succeeded in solving the problem alone you can be successful but you sacrifice your friends. You succeeded but others did not. So inevitably you have to succeed together. The Awardees must decide how to succeed together. That’s what makes the games contrary to their ego. Some think that if they are successful together with others then their success is 4466 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY DRA. SRI HASTARI Z. BIRAN - Direktur PT Daya Insani Revealing the Real Character, Forging Unity FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Reflection session
  • 26. only 50 percent. In fact they want to success completely. But others say, maybe I’m not as good as you, but I also want to feel successful, help me please. “That’s it. So this game builds awareness of the importance of togetherness. The beauty of unity. Each has its advantages and each has its drawbacks. If they can complete one another they will be stronger,” said the experienced practitioner in Human Resource Management (HRM). At night there was a ‘watch together’ session. The committee played a documentary film about Indonesian nature without text or narration. The committee did not mention what the title of the movie was or where it was set. The documentary showed the scenery at Lake Toba, natural beauty at Kelok. Ampek Puluah Ampek, the romantic Ngarai Sianok, the famous underwater Bunaken, the fascinating stretch of Raja Ampat archipelago and even more beautiful places. But, no kidding, no participant knew the places. Halloooo ... it’s Indonesia! “Oh, Indonesia!? There are so beautiful places, aren’t there?” Some participants exclaimed surprised. Of the many participants there was only one person who called a location correctly. She also hesitated. According to Sri, Daya Insani they play this movie to remind them of Indonesia and to remind them that they have a responsibility to this country. There are social problems, cultural problems and so many other problems that must be solved. “Hopefully they will be involved in the process. They can make something useful. So we remind them that we are the people of Indonesia. That’s the goal. We are Indonesian. Do your best for this nation.” Then there was a discussion that the trainer opened with a touching story from his heart. “You are to be schooled abroad but do not bring back here all the forces from there. We are here and we do not want to lose our Indonesia.” At the opening the participants were reluctantly singing Indonesia Raya but not this time. All were singing heartily, full appreciation and full of love. The participants could not control their emotions and were hugging one another tearfully. The trainer of Daya Insani couldn’t help crying they were all in tears. They were all emotional and in love with Indonesia. In this emotional situation, Cultural Observer M. Sobari, one of the guest speakers in the training expressed his annoyance at the people who had studied abroad, but after returning home made no contribution. What’s their contribution to this country? Why aren’t they visible? Where are they hiding? Two days training is not enough. Sri herself said two days is a very short time to establish the characters. “But at least we can help them to be able to study there,” said Sri, who had served as a HR manager in a clinical laboratory that has more than 50 branches spread across various places in Indonesia. It is expected that after the training the participants will keep in touch with each other. While in America they are usually on their own as they are spread over various campuses and cities. If they keep in touch, they will never feel alone. They can talk to each other and if there is a problem there will be a friend who is willing to help. Before leaving Ciawi participants wrote their plan on a piece of paper. As a leader what they will do? What will you do after studying in the United States? The paper is collected and stored by IIEF. When they come home they are reminded of their initial intentions. Do they still remember their intention? Change is fine, as long as it is for his own good, other people and their environment. “Hopefully, when they get back here it is to refresh and to remind them that now they’re home they should recall the first intentions that they made before leaving the country,” said Sri. 4477 FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI A qualified psychologist
  • 27. EVALUATION: INDUCTION IS SO MEANINGFUL An important induction is given to the PRESTASI scholarship recipients. But how does the induction benefit them? Opinions, attitudes and suggestions from the participants are very important for IIEF. IIEF can find out if the services that they provide are in accordance with the needs of the participants before they jump on the new campuses both in the U.S. and in Indonesia. For that purpose a team from IIEF led by Devi Miarni Umar, a Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist from PRESTASI have designed 20 questions with closed and open systems to all debriefing participants to evaluate the meaning, function and impact of these supplies. The closed questions were regarding the material being taught, mentors, training facilities and so on including the level of their acceptance. The questions are multiple-choice ranging from very good to bad, from very satisfactory to not satisfactory at all, from useful to useless. Open questions are related to a number of issues regarding the implementation of the debriefing and especially suggestions. Participants are free to deliver their opinions and comments here. “Ideally to evaluate or assess an activity we should have a baseline. Unfortunately PRESTASI does not have baseline information from previous programs that could be used as a reference against which to review the impact of an intervention at the end of the activity. Therefore, to work around this the team and I at IIEF designed tools to measure the impact with the use of quantitative and qualitative methods to approach retrospective and current situations,” said Devi about the tools used to evaluate the scholars. This approach allowed IIEF team to dig up information before and after the intervention by IIEF through a series of activities prepared for the scholars. From the results of the evaluation of the induction participants, Devi concluded the following: Training or induction provides an opportunity for the PRESTASI scholarship awardees to improve their knowledge and skills in the fields of academics, leadership and writing. In terms of training time and the number of participants they consider their ratios to be adequate, although some found that the statistical training time was too short. “Statistical learning materials aim to teach too much for just three days,” – this was the feedback taken from one of the course participants. When appraising the series of training arrangements in place the awardees think it’s already good, particularly in terms of materials and schedules. They think it’s managed very well. The materials used were considered important to support the training, while the handouts used were considered to be good quality and relevant. The facilities were also considered to be appropriate and in accordance with the activities session. The classroom environment is very supportive of the participants learning especially for English training sessions and leadership. One participant wrote, “The class was able to help me to be actively involved in every session of activities.” The facilitators at the International Language Institute - University of Indonesia (LBI-UI), University of Atma Jaya and PT Daya Insani were thought to be experts in their field, well prepared, well organized, responsive to participants, and with capabilities to create an atmosphere of learning and have the appropriate ways of teaching. The training participants proposed additional time for statistics training and leadership as well as more time for preparation for TOEFL®iBT than TOEFL®ITP. 4488 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 28. Here is a summary of the views of some student candidates after attending English Language, Statistics and Leadership Training. These comments come from the written evaluations submitted by induction participants. Some entries submitted by the scholars will certainly be used by IIEF in designing future programs. Here are some excerpts of their comments: “Induction really helped me in preparing to continue my study in the United States,” wrote one participant. “English Training really helped me in improving my English skills. While statistical training would be better held after the English course was completed in order to make our brains fresh” said a recipient of PRESTASI scholarship. “The time for statistical training is too short, so we do not have enough time to understand the material,” said another participant. “I got a lot of capacity building from the induction. It increased my confidence,” wrote a third participant. PRE-DEPARTURE ORIENTATION Besides getting English, statistical science, and leadership training PRESTASI scholarship recipients still need to get another induction before they enter college in the United States. The induction is in the form of self-readiness - anything needed to support their studies running smoothly. The induction was obtained through activities during the three days named Pre-Departure Orientation (PDO). During this event the PRESTASI scholars, from various regions in Indonesia, gathered in Jakarta. In this PDO activity the participants are given various information about the role of IIEF and IIE; latest developments regarding the PRESTASI program; the terms and conditions of the contract of PRESTASI recipients with USAID; a list of needs before departure; information regarding their management of their time, etc. With such a comprehensive induction the participants are expected to be ready to leave with no issues left uncovered. “This orientation is intended to explain in detail about the role of the stakeholders that are useful for the PRESTASI recipients to understand their roles and responsibilities during their study period in the USA. This activity is an invaluable session, which also involves sharing the experience of the alumni as well as realizing the need for self-management skills in the USA,” explained Mira Sambada. The three-day event was varied and dynamic. The participants were sometimes fed up but they mostly listened seriously to the facilitators for they felt that all the material presented were useful for their readiness to arrive and settle into the United States of America. 4499 FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Theophanny Rampisela shared experiences and stories while in U.S.
  • 29. “This induction provides comprehensive information about what to do before, during, and after studying in the United States,” commented a participant through an evaluation sheet. “All the materials delivered (the facilitators) are new to me, and very helpful,” said another participant, “Induction gives a lot of information before we leave for the USA.” Amongst the briefing material deemed relevant to their needs there is technical information on various things allowed and forbidden in the USA and the regulations regarding USA immigration. IIEF has prepared various types of relevants materials for participants but some want additional material about cultural shock, credit systems and universities grading systems in the United States. Therefore some people suggested that there was a, “Need to add another night to the orientation.” Another thing that is very useful for the participants in the PDO is a meeting with fellow PRESTASI scholarship recipients. They feel there are similarities of “fate” that make them united. “It was great being able to meet up with fellow scholarship recipients who will get the same experience,” said one participant. Overall, based on the evaluation results, which the participants delivered, the participants were extremely satisfied with the activities of the PDO. They were satisfied with the material presented and they also gave the thumbs up to the facilitators that they thought were excellent. The PDO induction makes them become more confident to go, stay, and struggled with the course material in the United States. “This event makes me able to prepare all the things needed to study abroad,” said a PRESTASI awardee. FROM THE DEPARTURE TO TAKING PART While the PRESTASI recipients are taking the induction, the Training and Monitoring Division of PRESTASI are struggling with the following matters; preparing all their needs and documents etc. until they are completed and ready to go. Communication with IIEF partners in Washington DC during the pre departure stage is intensified. One of the most important things is to get information from IIE about colleges that most deserves the recipients. They certainly need to know the requirements in detail to facilitate their registration. Having completed the induction it was time for the scholarship recipients to choose colleges, and 5500 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY Briefing on the general information and picture of the life and education in U.S. FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 30. to fill out the application, which the details of requirements had been prepared by the PRESTASI IIEF. The applications were then sent to the United States. Then there is a waiting stage, waiting for information from the U.S. about who has been offered an acceptance and who has not been offered an acceptance. Participants who do not pass generally do so because they chose excellent campuses, or their TOEFL®ITP score is not enough. An excellent campus usually requires the equivalent score of TOEFL®ITP of around 580. But their TOEFL®ITP score were only 500 so automatically they have a limited choice. “The participants who are not accepted by their chosen college have not failed – they will just have to take additional English classes in the U.S. or choose another campus. That’s why we always remind participants at the beginning that if they are good at English, they will automatically have more choices,” said Wiwin of the Division of Training and Monitoring of PRESTASI. Another obstacle, according to Wiwin, is that sometimes scholars are selected for colleges chosen by the IIEF team and actually the scholar wants to go somewhere different. If this is not communicated until late in the process it becomes a difficult problem with the deadlines looming. Addressing the same issue, Wiwin claimed to be careful in making him/her understand. “Simply this,” Wiwin pointed out, “if you’re good at TOEFL®iBT you have many school choices. And vice versa. In principle scholars should also measure their own capacity. But basically this program allows them to apply to any possible college.” The next obstacle is related to the funding. Popular schools are usually very expensive. On the other hand this scholarship has tuition cap (maximum tuition fees can be paid by USAID). That’s why the university tuition chosen by scholars must comply with donor funding capability. There are many ways to Rome. There is always a way out. Having experience and good networking in the United States, the IIEF and the IIE sometimes register scholars with additional scholarships. This is because almost all universities have scholarship programs. There can be a kind of cost sharing to cover the cost margin of university with the funding cap by the donor. “For example, if tuition at the college was $ 50,000 they are given a $ 10,000 discount which is really good. That’s one of the things that we can do - It’s one of the ways. From the data IIEF recorded approximately 56% of PRESTASI scholars obtained cost sharing from the universities,” said the traveling and enthusiastic woman who has visited many countries. For her, the success of dispatching and placing participants according to their own choice of campus has its own happiness. “Many participants have entered prestigious schools in the United States such as John Hopkins University, Duke University, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) and UC Davis. Even one of our participants qualified for Yale University - one of the American universities that fall into the Ivy League. Due to our team, both in Jakarta and in Washington DC, we always try to prepare scholars to be able to compete at a global level and get the best results,” said Wiwin. For the participants themselves who have also worked hard and who take the whole program prepared by the team of PRESTASI very seriously - it is certainly a good fortune. In their next curriculum vitae they will be noted as USAID PRESTASI and the great campuses’ scholarship awardees. Wiwin shared with us the secret recipe of IIEF, which is why many PRESTASI participants received scholarships at prestigious campuses in America. With experience of dealing with the 5511
  • 31. scholarship program for more than 20 years IIEF is well aware of a few things that attract the attention of the leading campuses when they are reading applicants’ essays. Essay writing is one of the most important application processes. Training in essay writing for the participants before leaving is very useful. EAP participants were also trained to write essays in English. “Through the program modules that we have designed with LBI-UI, we train scholars to prepare essays, although the application process may be done there (America). We review their essays here. Well, a good essay is one of those provisions to enter the top campus there,” said Wiwin again. Having placed each awardee at a college either in the United States or in Indonesia the next task of IIEF team was to dispatch the scholars. For those studying in the United States the departure is usually conducted in August before the semester starts. For about two years they will study in the country (U.S.). However, the IIEF task is not automatically completed after the participants finish their study periods in the USA or Indonesia. There are still other important tasks such as monitoring the development of each grantee’s study. This task is very important to know the constraints faced by each student and then to take steps to address them so that each grantee can study well and on schedule. Endah Tri Kurnawaty, while studying at Indiana University proposed to get the additional Academic Writing Skills to the PRESTASI scholarship program. “I was asked to write a brief proposal and sent it via email and the proposal was accepted,” she said. Nia, the nickname of Endah Tri Kurniawaty, then took a class in academic writing skills outside of the regular class schedule. The entire cost of the course was fully funded by the PRESTASI scholarship program administrators. “I was greatly supported by the program, as I often have to submit my work in writing,” she explained. Not only that but as the subject field studied by Nia required additional charges she submitted additional fund proposals in order to attend the courses. The proposals were accepted. “I think at that time I could give a good reason, so my request was granted,” she said. Baryanto had another similar story. When he was in a period of studying at the University of Gajah Mada there were representatives of the AED (Academy for Educational Development) who met with him to ask if he was having difficulty in taking his scholarship program. “Even the staff of the AED asked me whether I was active in my college and asked for my grades from the rector’s office,” he said. Although Baryanto doesn’t have difficulties during his study he considered it was a form of very good monitoring to find out if students were having problems in their learning process. Also be Seen on Campus The task of monitoring in the United States is carried out by a team from PRESTASI IIEF partners based in Washington DC, Institute of International Education (IIE). The IIE-PRESTASI team directly saw that PRESTASI students were enrolled at campuses in the USA. One example is PRESTASI students at Saint Louis University (SLU) and the University of Missouri, Saint Louis, in the State of Missouri. At that time, there were four students taking studies at the Faculty of Public Health (School of Public Health) at SLU. According to Rachael Fellabaum one of the IIE-PRESTASI Program Officers the four students were close to one another. In fact there were two students who were late for about two months due to delayed visas. However, two students who had already been in SLU welcomed the two students and introduced them to the town and campus. The warm welcome made the new students comfortable 5522 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY
  • 32. and helped them in adapting to the new environment and made their relationship closer. When Fellabaum met the PRESTASI students she felt the same hospitality as she got before via telephone and email. However, when meeting them directly she could know more about the development of each student and their ability to conduct themselves in areas where they attended school. From these encounters Fellabaum was very impressed not only by the familiarity between PRESTASI students at SLU but also by their activities in the School of Public Health and in their communities. Fellabaum got the information from the faculty that each PRESTASI student had contributed valuable knowledge to their classmates about the information and typical viewpoints of Indonesia. The PRESTASI students, said faculty members, also showed willingness to understand America, as well as a sincere wish to share about their culture and traditions to the people they met in Saint Louis. Their hospitality was also shown to Fellabaum when they invited her to come to their apartment. She got treats of typical foods from Indonesia plus typical candied sweets of Saint Louis. That night they had a party filled with life stories and stories of their cultural background and the Indonesian National Anthem was sung solemnly. The memorable night showed the close relationship between staff and PRESTASI students. As a member of staff at IIE- PRESTASI, Rachael Fellabaum felt very fortunate to be able to witness the development of each student of PRESTASI during their study in the USA. Most of the students thought Fellabaum did not realize that they had changed after two years of living and studying outside of Indonesia. They have turned into more independent people, self- confident, attentive, knowledgeable, and focused on their future. Fellabaum also said, “We sincerely hope the scholars will continue to grow and develop after their return to Indonesia. Surely they will face the challenges of their future but we hope their experience during their stay in the USA will be able to assist them in meeting these challenges in a creative and critical way. In addition, we also expect them to share the knowledge and experience to the work environment and their community. Once they are back in Indonesia with their advanced skills, we hope they will re-enter the work environment and their community by upholding the values of lifelong learning. Every experience they have is an opportunity to grow and develop. By keeping on learning along their life the PRESTASI scholars will definitely achieve extraordinary success as individuals, as professionals and as citizens.” Towards the end of the semester the PRESTASI scholarship recipients who have graduated gathered at IIE offices in Washington DC to participate in a Re-Entry Workshop. This workshop provides an opportunity for them to reflect on the experience and describe achievements and plan to apply their knowledge and skills. This meeting is also a great opportunity for them to develop a network and to celebrate the outstanding achievements that they have achieved. Before they come to the workshop they have been told in 5533 FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Lindsay Hillenberg visits Tyas at Florida Atlantic University
  • 33. advance that they should bring a hat and shirt or graduation toga. Having finished the workshop sessions, wearing a toga, they pose together in front of the Presidential Office of the USA, The White House. Of course this photo action along with the toga, in front of the White House attracts the attention of tourists visiting the place. Some tourists even ask students to explain where they came from. They also asked the scholars to explain PRESTASI program, what they have achieved and their plans for the future. Keep in Touch Another task to be done after the scholarship recipients complete their studies is the welcoming back of the PRESTASI alumni’s in to the country and to report their arrival to USAID sponsor. The process of returning usually has no significant obstacles. No one was missing or did not want to go home as the program does require them to return home at the end. Moreover, their visas are only for one single entry to the USA so the validity period of their visa expires on the day that they leave There is a funny story related to this visa deadline. There are some universities that hold graduation ceremonies after the scholarship recipients’ visas have expired. Surely they could not wait for graduation ceremony because their visas had already expired. They certainly couldn’t come to the graduation because they have to go back to their country. Well, they are just preposterous. So that there is a keepsake, the PRESTASI scholarship recipients held their own graduation. Having returned to their homeland and back to their respective working environments they still keep in touch with IIE. The relationship was developed through joint work plans, through the organization of alumni PRESTASI called Alumni Association PRESTASI–HICD America Indonesia (ALPHA-I). This is one of the advantages of the PRESTASI program, which other scholarship agencies do not possess “Because our binding feeling is not only when departing but also after returning home. At least the relationship is still maintained. If we have a project in an area, we have people to help with the project,” said Wiwin about the importance of the alumni organization. PRESTASI Staff hope that the graduates will continue to grow as mature people in the future. They all have great potential to grow as a leader in the workplace and their communities. PRESTASI staff wants to keep on providing support and guidance to equip them with a completeness they need to become successful members of society and care. 5544 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Rachael Fellabaum meets Bernie at University of Nebraska
  • 34. ALPHA-I ALREADY ROCKING STEP Having completed their studies in the United States and Indonesia the PRESTASI scholarship recipients and HICD (Human and Institutional Capacity Development), of course, have to apply their knowledge in their environment. In spite of returning home and serve to their respective institutions as required by the contract between the donor (USAID), scholars and implementers (organizers of the program), how do the best people of this nation payback to Indonesia and the public at large. The idea of an alumni association has been initiated by USAID and the Academy for Educational Development (AED), previously in charge of the program implementers of HICD program. On receiving the PRESTASI program in May 2012, IIEF knew that USAID and AED had established a team of alumni as a result of the first alumni meeting attended by about 61 alumni in February 2012, organized by AED. In the meeting, Boediono Darsono was elected as chairman of the Formation Team (representing the Development Objective Team/DOT Economic Growth), Silvy Andika Sari 5555 Alumni meeting to prepare the establishment of ALPHA-I Seriously formulate the concept of Alumni Association FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, ACTING PLACE WHILE BACK
  • 35. (Education) as a secretary and three members of the formation: Jatmiko Wahyu Nugroho Joshua (Democratic Governance), Ni Ketut Susilarini (Health) and Rosmala Daud (Environment). To follow the formation of an alumni organization, Chief of Party (COP) PRESTASI Mira Sambada and her deputy, Deputy Chief of Party (DCOP) Lensi Mursida held an initial meeting with the formation team, followed by a series of meetings involving some of the alumni who graduated under the program HICD as well as with PRESTASI. Initially IIEF was doubtful as to whether an alumnus association could be formed and whether there were alumni who will take the time to take care of the organization because the alumnus is generally busy with their mounting activities after returning home to Indonesia. The same doubts were owned by some of the alumni when told about the plan to form an organization of alumni, some even worried about if their activities in the alumni associations could hamper their careers in the office. But, after going through some intense meetings and discussions with alumni, IIEF and the alumni finally agreed to hold the second National Alumni Meeting in March 2012, in which IIEF acted as a facilitator of the meeting and was responsible for the logistics and administration, while the Alumni Steering Committee formed a team (Steering Committee) and the Organizing Committee (Executive Committee) was responsible for the agenda, the content and material that would be discussed in the alumni meeting. “We had long days full of lengthy discussions and sometimes there was a sharp conflict of opinion among alumni but it was really fun,” said Lensi who was actively involved with the alumni at the Alumni establishment plan when it was initiated and finalized. The ideas were rolling and were discussed intensively. Preceded by a small working team consisting of about ten alumni - who were in charge of preparing the national alumni gathering - and supported by IIEF and USAID, the event, called National Alumni Gathering, was held at Cemara Hotel, Jakarta, on March 2 to 4, 2012. It was attended by as many as 61 people from various parts of the country. The alumni gathering atmosphere was so alive and full of spirit. Three short days but three historic days. An agreement was reached to name their organization the 5566 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI Joshua dan Sylvi are having a discussion Glenn E Anders, USAID Indonesia Mission Director
  • 36. ALPHA-I, which stands for the Association of Alumni PRESTASI - HICD America Indonesia. As well as the name of the organization being agreed the alumni meeting also selected three people to form a “working cabinet” for ALPHA-I. The three figure were Akhmad Safik, an alumnus of the School of Law, University of Washington, who teaches at the University of Al-Azhar, Jakarta, as Chairman; Zaenal Arifin, an alumnus of the University of Pittsburgh School of Public Policy, who works at Bappenas, the Secretary-General; and Novi Anggriani, short-term training program alumnus who works at The Asia Foundation as Treasurer. Safik was called to actively initiate the life of ALPHA-I because they feel that it is proper that PRESTASI Alumni should do things together - as they have been facilitated in the scholarship program. If done individually it will be less effective. With this organization, and with Safik as chairman of the ALPHA-I he hopes that the alumni can do something meaningful for Indonesia. It is one of the intellectual responsibilities to be properly managed. The secretary general Zaenal Arifin had the same recollection as the chairman. “It’s a mean of exploration and an appropriate organization for our souls,” said the BAPPENAS employee. Safik, Ary, and Novi moved quickly to carry out the mandate, which they hold. Just a few weeks later they managed to form a complete management at central and regional levels, which will serve until 2014. The first national meeting of the full board was successfully held on 26- 27 May 2012 at the Hotel Bluesky Pandurata Jakarta. In this event statutes, systems and the completeness of work organization of ALPHA-I were formulated as well as the work plan for the year. The work program, said Safik, was made with measurable impact. ALPHA-I plan to, at least once a year, hold an international event, several events nationwide and some of the routine events on a smaller scale. The focus of the work program is in the areas of health, economic growth, environment, education and the strengthening of democracy and good governance. Safik hopes that ALPHA-I will develop programs that are able to contribute to a vision of ‘Re-inventing Indonesia’ and to build a new Indonesia. Having agreed the work program the board is moving quickly to implement it. One of their inaugural programs is ‘Climate Change Goes To 5577 FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI USAID and IIEF Representatives receive book titled “Indonesia Optimis” from Alumni To vote, to elect a leader
  • 37. School’, specifically for Jakarta and its surrounding areas. These activities include: first, a writing contest with the same theme for all of the students, secondly, interactive discussion on the radio to discuss climate change from the perspective of health, education and the environment published by KBR 68H Radio and relayed by the 50 radio networks in KBR 68H throughout Indonesia, third, interactive discussions, experience sharing, and seeing a movie concerning climate change together. The campaign against climate change is rallied through the song with Bingo Band, which will hopefully establish a youth community who are aware of climate change. According to Safik the activities are aimed to provide insight for the high school students about climate change and they are expected to change their behavior patterns with respect to the environment. The series premiere ALPHA-I program was held. The writing contest began on July 2012 and ended on 17 September 2012. Interactive dialogue on the radio was already held on August 14, 2012 in collaboration with Green Radio Jakarta. While interactive discussion was held on 4 September 2012 at @america, Pasific Place Jakarta. The realization of the next program is a workshop on the preparation of local budgets that are participatory. Through this activity they want to transmit an understanding that good governance and clean environments require active involvement of communities in development planning and budgeting. The workshop was held in Banda Aceh, September 2012. Workshop participants were young people, especially university students, along with local community leaders, journalists, NGOs and local government officials. ALPHA-I stepped up pretty quickly. Born just a few months ago it has made concrete steps. And the next steps to be taken have been arranged, - all of which are just merely for the sake of many people, for a better Indonesia. Starting from something small and done with joy. “I am always glad to do good things for other people,” said Zaenal Arifin. 5588 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY Voting Result The elected board forms a cabinet of ALPHA-I Mira Sambada, COP PRESTASI pinned ‘a pin’ to the Secretary General of ALPHA-I in its first Rakernas Bingo Band in ‘Climate Change Goes To School’ activity Interactive discussion on Climate Change for youth Workshop on participatory budgeting in Banda Aceh FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI FOTO:IIEF-PRESTASI
  • 38. AGUS YUDI WICAKSONO MMaasstteerr iinn PPuubblliicc PPoolliiccyy,, MMiicchhiiggaann SSttaattee UUnniivveerrssiittyy,, EEaasstt LLaannssiinngg SSttaaffff aatt tthhee CCeenntteerr ffoorr SSttrraatteeggiicc PPoolliiccyy SSttuuddiieess,, MMiinniissttrryy ooff HHoommee AAffffaaiirrss Reflecting on Connecticut Sidewalks 5599 ALUMNI GAIT By the end of the PRESTASI program in September 2012 about 89 alumni of the Long Term Training (LTT) program of HICD and PRESTASI scholarship program have completed their studies and have returned to Indonesia. Together with 162 alumni of Short Term Training (STT) program, total alumni of FORECAST - HICD and PRESTASI program totals 251 people. Here are excerpts from some LTT alumni gait compiled by IIEF team. Coming and serving a two-year school period in the United States make him amazed at the country’s sidewalks. He even has a collection of photos of these sidewalks! According to him, the pavement is a reflection of a country’s services to its people. When he first set foot in Dulles International Airport, Washington DC, in August 2009, Agus Yudi Wicaksono was gob-smacked. His eyes were amazed by airport buildings in the United States capital. When taken to the Inn at the Churchill Hotel, located directly across from the Hilton Hotel, he was even more amazed. “There was a really great sidewalk,” said the man from Papua amazed. The sidewalk is located on Connecticut Avenue and is five feet wide. The edge of the sidewalk that faces the street is made like a ramp. The sidewalk allows people in a wheelchair to easily roll down the sidewalk after they get off the bus.” In Indonesia the sidewalk is made perpendicular to the curb so that motorcycles cannot pass. In the U.S., it FOTO:BODICHANDRA/IIEF-PRESTASI An asset in Ministry of Home Affairs
  • 39. is made to decline so that people in wheelchairs can go down without any help,” told the second of four brothers. Since then he began photographing the pavements on various roads in the United States to be a collection. For him the pavement becomes a mirror of how the government functions in terms of community service. “I utterly felt it was a public service,” said the graduate of Michigan State University. The sidewalk gave him the inspiration and self-confidence that his position as a civil servant is serving a public function. “If our principle is service, serve it well,” he said with a serious face. Yudi, was known in the neighborhood as a very serious person. Once, when received as a civil servant, the father of two children did have the principle of serving in doing his tasks. The implementation, said Yudi, is not only serving the community but also have to make coworkers comfortable when serving one another. Fortunate after Frustration Yudi got information about the PRESTASI program when the program was called FORECAST - HICD - when he took an English course at the Central Administration of International Cooperation, Ministry of Home Affairs. At that time he was frustrated because his desire to continue his education was tumbled by the education system’s mechanism in Indonesia, including information on scholarships in the country are closed. Thus, civil servants like him can only hope for the ‘goodness’ of information from the International Cooperation Administration Center. The second obstacle he faced, as the Government High School graduates in the State (STPDN), Jatinangor, he just got D4 (diploma 4). “For S2 (master), I must take the S1 (bachelor),” he said. However, after a team from the Academy for Educational Development (AED), the contractor HICD program, verified to STPDN and finally obtained an explanation, despite STPDN being D4 the number of credits (semester credit system) required by STPDN is PRESTASI: A JOURNEY Sidewalks in Michigan that interest Yudi FOTO:PERSONALDOCUMENTATION
  • 40. equivalent to S1 and Yudi finally went through. When registering for PRESTASI Yudi found it difficult to qualify. His TOEFL®ITP score was only 463, much lower of the requirements for placement at a university in the land of Uncle Sam, which requires 550. “Perhaps the reviewer saw my resolve,” he thought. Due to his strong will Yudi continued and he participated in a ‘debate’ in front of six reviewers. “I’ve been like a vent, explaining my anxiety about the service and why I want to learn in the United States,” he said. His sincerity to re-learn was costly as when he had to go to America his wife was pregnant. “It’s hard for me to leave my wife,” he said. Arriving in the United States was also not easy for Yudi as the United States was the first foreign country he had visited. He had many difficulties. For example, although his TOEFL®ITP score was already qualified 550 Yudi was still not good at writing so he had to take English classes in the morning and in the evenings - for an entire semester he could take one subject only. “Oh, I was depressed,” he said. In the classroom he could not respond to the ongoing discussions. “Sometimes I feel that my work was well written but my professor did not understand what I wrote,” he recalled, laughing. His confidence appeared after two semesters in the U.S.. He began actively participating in the discussions. Even in the class he became an unofficial resource for undergraduate students at Michigan State University about the history of Indonesia in the subject of Indonesian Politics and Moslems (Indonesia and Muslim Politics). His unyielding spirit enabled him to overcome challenges gradually. Having succeeded in finding ‘the light’ at the campus he also enlightened us about where he lived which was fairly far away from the campus, especially he had to go home in the evening. “It was easy to find transport but I had to concentrate on where I was going,” he said. He had only three days of preparation prior to arriving in America. Although there were four seasons, Yudi had no problem with the change of weather in the country. Because, he said, he was familiar with the heat and cold temperatures from his childhood in Papua. “Wamena was bitterly cold, Abepura was hot. It was not so different,” said Yudi, who spent his childhood until his high school in Papua. The problem he had was when he lived in a university apartment for the second half of his stay. “Once the heating was turned off I finally learned to use heating blankets,” he said, laughing. Once back in Indonesia Yudi became a mainstay of his office in the Central of Strategic Policy Studies, Ministry of Home Affairs. Yudi has to analyze the policy quickly for consideration and report to the Minister of Home Affairs Gamawan Fauzi. The report should be brief and clear. “Top management do not have time to read long reports so they should be clear and concise,” said Public Policy graduate of Michigan State University. Yudi applies two approaches in analyzing. The first is the qualitative provision of STPDN. The second is quantitative analyzing - a characteristic he learned at his U.S. College. “I used to read the data and quantify the phenomenon and then explain it in a qualitative way,” he said. For example, he said, when the data from the Central Statistics Agency (BPS) gives figures for the number of high school teachers in 2004 and says that the number decreased in 2009 by 15% the data would not be ‘read’. “If you go down by 15% it is necessary to find the number of 15%,” he said. Yudi know the 15% reduction rate occurred because many people actually still want to become civil servants (PNS), but they were stuck for the policy of the government of Indonesia, which imposes civil servant moratorium so they finally moved into the teaching profession. “Apparently, it was a strategy of many people in the area to remain as civil servants,” he said. Yudi’s expertise is greatly appreciated by his boss, Chief of Center for Strategic Policy Studies of 6611
  • 41. the Ministry of Home Affairs, Anselmus Tan. “He was the mainstay of my confirmation,” said Anselmus. Yudi, said Anselmus, became the person to ask to confirm various things to get the basic logic of an academic issue. Yudi, according to Anselmus, is very strong in issue comparison. “He can compare the problems in detail and help me decide which one is the best solution,” he said. Anselmus praised Yudi’s progressive attitude. “His affection is good which is also a nice surprise,” said Anselmus. He thinks that now Yudi has become wiser in delivering his opinions. “He’s more polite,” he added. His politeness, he said, was not seen when he recently graduated from STPDN. “In STPDN the one who was wrong used to be grounded as though everything is black and white.” It’s a habit that Yudi brought to his office at the Ministry of Home Affairs. “I directed him to be more flexible,” said Anselmus. However, sometimes the ‘real character’ still comes out. “He’s from Papua and sometimes quite stubborn,” he said. After returning home from Michigan some colleagues in the Ministry considered his actions a little vain just because he is from abroad. If it were so, Anselmus said, he would take Yudi to his room to halt his actions. In short, Yudi is very fortunate to have a leader like Anselmus who considers him a cadre in the MOHA. Yudi, as revealed by Anselmus, has been an outstanding member of staff since he arrived in his new office. “I’ve known him since 2008, he has a strong will and stubbornness,” said Anselmus. But he did not think his stubbornness affected his will to learn, Yudi will spend a lot more time on an English course at the British Institute. “Finally I asked him to borrow books from there.” Not only that but with his improved English skills Yudi is Anselmus’s mainstay in every moment that requires English. “I asked him to make the resume of books borrowed, Handbooks of Regional and Local Government.” After Yudi came home from the United States Anselmus gave him additional tasks such as conducting meetings in English. Anselmus praised Yudi’s speed in making reports. One day his division got the task of designing bureaucratic reform from the minister. He worked along with other fields working on projects to improve performance. Reports were given by each field and the department at the ministry. The reports were all compiled and analyzed by Yudi. Anselmus asked for the reports to be completed on that day, because it will be submitted to Minister Gamawan on the next day. “At two in the morning I was relieved – he sent me good reports via email,” he said. Wildan Fathurahman also confirmed Anselmus praise. “He was already smart by nature,” said the graduate of the University of Indonesia about Yudi. Wildan has known Yudi since February 2009. Wildan saw that the father of two children has rapidly progressed. Yudi, he said, “is not only good in terms of concept but also at implementation. All he did was feasible.” He also formed the habit of making reports while on duty outside Jakarta. Wildan said that as a civil servant the working relationship to the area is usually just to request data from the local government and then to process it. At least, go to Regional Planning Agency (BAPPEDA), or the Regional Secretariat in provincial, district or city level. “But he has also widely requested feed back from the community and included it in the report. Thus the performance evaluation,” says Wildan, “becomes more ‘alive’.” According to Wildan Yudi become more humanistic after returning from America. “He was stern, A is A and B is B - probably because of his militaristic education. Now he wants to learn to understand others.” It is apparent when he is arguing. Although he makes strong quantitative arguments backed up by qualitative data Yudi sometimes will also concede. Because of all his achievements, Agus Yudi Wicaksono is well known throughout the MOHA, both for his work contribution and for his stubbornness. Secretary General and Director General are well aware of his achievements. Wildan asserted, “He is an asset to the Ministry.” 6622 PRESTASI: A JOURNEY