Preventative Work & Promotion of Psychological Wellbeing in Clinical Psychology ...
Preventative Approach • “…interventions that anticipate a disorder, or promote optimal health prior to the ...
Why useful in mental health? • 450 million people alive today suffer mental health disorders (WHO, 2001) •...
Focus of interventions • Why don’t individuals seek help? – Stigma – Failure to identify symptoms ...
Types of Prevention Programmes • Universal • Selective • IndicatedMonday, 14 May 2012
Prevention Programmes • Depression in adults – prevention of development of moderate depressive episod...
Prevention Programmes • Depression in children – reduction in depressive episodes and symptoms of depr...
Recommendations for Prevention Programmes • In order to be most effective, a screening process should be use...
Prevention Programmes? Early Bird The NAS EarlyBird Programme is autism- specific and has three content thre...
Prevention Programmes? Mellow Parenting / Mellow Babies • Aims to support parents with relationship problems...
Prevention Programmes? The Solihull Approach • Integrated model of working • Resource packs and training for c...
‘Mental capital’ over the course of life Beddington et al. (2008)Monday, 14 Ma...
Early Intervention in Childhood • Maximising protective factors: proactive approach to mental health and wellb...
Pyramid Clubs • Screening of children at risk: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman, 198...
Pyramid Clubs • SDQ completed as follow-up measure • Rich data set (pre- and post- activity club) but little...
Nurture Groups • For primary school children with social, emotional or behavioural difficulties (as measur...
Examples with Adults • Role for CPs in training, consultancy and research at multiple levels. Some exa...
Media • May 2008 BBC launched 2 year “Headroom” campaign • Includes on air programming, outdoor events...
Media • Peter Kinderman (Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool) developed “M...
Media • Benefits = BBC so reaching large audience, multifaceted “intervention”, increasing knowledge?,...
Positive Mental Attitudes (PMA) – Workplace Programme • Visit workplaces throughout Glasgow to provide menta...
Positive Mental Attitudes (PMA) – Workplace Programme Aim for participants to leave with increased understandi...
Positive Mental Attitudes (PMA) – Workplace Programme • PMA run other projects (Later Life, School based, As...
Why are psychologists best placed? • Knowledge base - expertise in area - Increase own knowledge ...
Barriers to preventative mental health practice • Who to target? • Is it possible within current resources of ...
Future Directions • Shift in paradigm needed – become more prevention focused • Further research needed ...
Any questions?Monday, 14 May 2012
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Preventative approaches in clinical psychology

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Health & Medicine      Technology      
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Transcripts - Preventative approaches in clinical psychology

  • 1. Preventative Work & Promotion of Psychological Wellbeing in Clinical Psychology Shona Brown Fleur-Michelle Coiffait Gráinne O’Brien Louise Roach Trainee Clinical Psychologists University of EdinburghMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 2. Preventative Approach • “…interventions that anticipate a disorder, or promote optimal health prior to the onset of a disorder (Goldston, 1977). • Physical health – immunizations, obesityMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 3. Why useful in mental health? • 450 million people alive today suffer mental health disorders (WHO, 2001) • Personal impact • Economic implications (Layard Report, 2005) – Focuses on individual levelMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 4. Focus of interventions • Why don’t individuals seek help? – Stigma – Failure to identify symptoms – Unaware of local resources Targeted by prevention of mental health problems and promotion of mental health wellbeing.Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 5. Types of Prevention Programmes • Universal • Selective • IndicatedMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 6. Prevention Programmes • Depression in adults – prevention of development of moderate depressive episodes and reduction in symptoms of anxiety and depression (Seligman et al., 1999; Munoz et al., 1995)Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 7. Prevention Programmes • Depression in children – reduction in depressive episodes and symptoms of depression (Clarke et al., 1995; Jaycox et al., 1994) • Substance misuse, anxiety, suicide...Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 8. Recommendations for Prevention Programmes • In order to be most effective, a screening process should be used. Focus on participants especially at risk • CBT is a popular model on which to base a programme • Group programmes are common, but individual approaches are also possibleMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 9. Prevention Programmes? Early Bird The NAS EarlyBird Programme is autism- specific and has three content threads. It helps parents to: • understand their childs autism • structure interactions in which communication can develop • pre-empt problem behaviours and handle those that occur.Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 10. Prevention Programmes? Mellow Parenting / Mellow Babies • Aims to support parents with relationship problems with their infants and young children • Combines personal support for parents with video and direct work with parents and children addressing parenting problemsMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 11. Prevention Programmes? The Solihull Approach • Integrated model of working • Resource packs and training for care professionals • Focuses on containment, reciprocity, and behaviour management • Research suggests 66% reduction of parental anxietyMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 12. ‘Mental capital’ over the course of life Beddington et al. (2008)Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 13. Early Intervention in Childhood • Maximising protective factors: proactive approach to mental health and wellbeing • Minimising effect of threats to mental wellbeing: early interventionMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 14. Pyramid Clubs • Screening of children at risk: Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman, 1989) • Multi-agency meeting to select 10 children • 10 week activity club hosted by schools • Trained volunteers provided by National Pyramid Trust (charity) run the clubsMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 15. Pyramid Clubs • SDQ completed as follow-up measure • Rich data set (pre- and post- activity club) but little published research • Children with and without difficulties appear to benefit from attending. • Significantly larger effect size for children with identified difficulties (Ohl et al., 2008)Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 16. Nurture Groups • For primary school children with social, emotional or behavioural difficulties (as measured using Boxall Profiles) • Small ‘nurturing’ class with increased staff ratio • Taught social skills and practical skills as well as curriculum based work • Routines, explanations in contextMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 17. Examples with Adults • Role for CPs in training, consultancy and research at multiple levels. Some examples: - media e.g. BBC’s “Headroom” - specific programmes e.g. Positive Mental Attitudes Workplace Intervention in GlasgowMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 18. Media • May 2008 BBC launched 2 year “Headroom” campaign • Includes on air programming, outdoor events and interactive website • Aim “to actively encourage people to assess their mental wellbeing and take simple, practical steps to manage or improve it”Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 19. Media • Peter Kinderman (Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Liverpool) developed “Mind Spa” component of website • Participants complete online assessments of their mental wellbeing and receive offer of personal life coach to explore results and develop plan with goals for the futureMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 20. Media • Benefits = BBC so reaching large audience, multifaceted “intervention”, increasing knowledge?, reducing stigma? (need for well conducted research) • But.. Many similar websites (e.g. Chris Williams’ LLTTF, Mood Gym). Waste of resources? Risk that users (and possibly referrers) will feel overwhelmed with choice?Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 21. Positive Mental Attitudes (PMA) – Workplace Programme • Visit workplaces throughout Glasgow to provide mental health awareness sessions to staff. • Assist organisations to develop mental health and wellbeing policies • Claim benefits to organisation (e.g. reduced staff absence and staff turnover). • Broader aim of increasing knowledge and reducing stigmaMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 22. Positive Mental Attitudes (PMA) – Workplace Programme Aim for participants to leave with increased understanding of: • Mental health, mental health problems and their causes • How to maintain their own mental health and that of those around them • Mental health and wellbeing resourcesMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 23. Positive Mental Attitudes (PMA) – Workplace Programme • PMA run other projects (Later Life, School based, Asylum Seekers and contribute to Scottish Mental Health and Arts Festival) • Funding and management input from NHS • Input from CPs based in primary care mental health team – consultancy role with regards content of programmes and research supervisionMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 24. Why are psychologists best placed? • Knowledge base - expertise in area - Increase own knowledge • Interdisciplinary working • Scientist Practitioner – Research, audit and evaluationMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 25. Barriers to preventative mental health practice • Who to target? • Is it possible within current resources of clinical psychology? • Where responsibility lie? – ‘Bystander effect’ (Ball, 2008)Monday, 14 May 2012
  • 26. Future Directions • Shift in paradigm needed – become more prevention focused • Further research needed – Need to ascertain validity and effectiveness of interventions. • CPs well placed to contribute to this research agendaMonday, 14 May 2012
  • 27. Any questions?Monday, 14 May 2012

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