Interactice technology in the FL classroom: Using polling and chat to promote student participation in campus ...
The traditional classroom
The traditional classroom What are you thinking? Did you understand? WHAT did you understand? What about YOU? And you?
The traditional classroom If students wrote their answers in a chat, I would be able to access everyone’s ...
Communication and participationHrastinski 2007
Communication and participationHrastinski 2007 Students were more motivated t...
Chat in education administrative information rather than supporting cognitive aspects of learning communication i...
Polling and chat in the classroom – apedagogical experimentSetting and technologyOn-campus course in grammar and translat...
Polling and chat in the classroom – apedagogical experimentAimspromote wider student participationtap into everyone’s un...
Adobe Connect Pro (ACP)A web-conferencing solution where you can ◦ communicate through audio, video and chat ◦...
An example of ACPadd functionality requires Flash playerthrough pods +internet connection pods may be mov...
Polling in ACP Which of these sentences contain an agreement error? Check ...
Chat in ACP
Teacher experience no technical problems participation was remarkably wide throughout reduced waiting time led to activ...
What did the students think? fun modern worked well efficient use of class time we liked the star slightly chaotic w...
Challenges Shifting between written and oral communication. Chat is informal. This will affect the atmosphere in ...
In conclusion Using polling and chat in the classroom creates a blend of oral and written interaction that caters to diffe...
Thank you for your attention! elisabeth.wulff-sahlen@mdh.se
References Clyde, William & Delohery, Andrew. (2004). Using Technology in Teaching. Yale University Press. Gonzal...
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Polling and Chat in the Foreign Language Classroom, higher ed

I'm always looking for ways to improve teaching and enhance learning, especially through technology. Recently, I used chat and polling in the classroom. That experiment resulted in a conference paper, presented at the international conference ICT for Language Learning, Nov 2011, Florence, Italy. These slides are from the conference.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Polling and Chat in the Foreign Language Classroom, higher ed

  • 1. Interactice technology in the FL classroom: Using polling and chat to promote student participation in campus education Elisabeth Wulff Sahlén Mälardalen University SwedenICT for Language LearningFlorence, 20-21 Oct 2011
  • 2. The traditional classroom
  • 3. The traditional classroom What are you thinking? Did you understand? WHAT did you understand? What about YOU? And you?
  • 4. The traditional classroom If students wrote their answers in a chat, I would be able to access everyone’s understanding…
  • 5. Communication and participationHrastinski 2007
  • 6. Communication and participationHrastinski 2007 Students were more motivated to participate in chat discussions because of direct response.
  • 7. Chat in education administrative information rather than supporting cognitive aspects of learning communication in FL with native speakers and other learners students are often more focused, thoughtful and honest in discussions online than F2F– even if in the same room! The Twitter experiment – Twitter in the classroom to get students involved in discussion
  • 8. Polling and chat in the classroom – apedagogical experimentSetting and technologyOn-campus course in grammar and translation foradvanced learners of EnglishAdobe Connect Pro to enable polling and chatSeminars in computer rooms, 3students/computerVideo projector to display student contributions fororal discussion
  • 9. Polling and chat in the classroom – apedagogical experimentAimspromote wider student participationtap into everyone’s understanding in order toprovide feedback where it is needed the most
  • 10. Adobe Connect Pro (ACP)A web-conferencing solution where you can ◦ communicate through audio, video and chat ◦ show power point presentations ◦ share your screen, whiteboard and files ◦ create interactive quizzes ◦ let students collaborate in small groups ◦ record the meeting and distribute the URL through e-mail or on your LMS ◦ etc… etc…
  • 11. An example of ACPadd functionality requires Flash playerthrough pods +internet connection pods may be moved and resized app for iphone and android switch between different layouts (”rooms”)
  • 12. Polling in ACP Which of these sentences contain an agreement error? Check all that apply!
  • 13. Chat in ACP
  • 14. Teacher experience no technical problems participation was remarkably wide throughout reduced waiting time led to active participation open channel between teacher and students informal and friendly atmosphere
  • 15. What did the students think? fun modern worked well efficient use of class time we liked the star slightly chaotic when everyone started to correct themselves
  • 16. Challenges Shifting between written and oral communication. Chat is informal. This will affect the atmosphere in the classroom. Managing large chunks of text in the chat. Traditional computer rooms are not ideal for face- to-face discussion.
  • 17. In conclusion Using polling and chat in the classroom creates a blend of oral and written interaction that caters to different learning styles while promoting wide student participation. Chat, in particular, has the potential to build a bridge between teacher assumptions and student understanding.
  • 18. Thank you for your attention! elisabeth.wulff-sahlen@mdh.se
  • 19. References Clyde, William & Delohery, Andrew. (2004). Using Technology in Teaching. Yale University Press. Gonzalez, Dafne. (2003) Teaching and Learning Through Chat. A Taxonomy of Educational Chat for EFL/ESL. Teaching English with Technology. Vol.3, nr. 4:57-69. Hrastinski, Stefan. (2007). Participating in synchronous online education. Akademisk avhandling. Lund: Studies in Informatics No. 6. Hrastinski, Stefan. (2009). Nätbaserad utbildning: en introduktion. Lund: Studentlitteratur. Mitchell, Rosamund & Myles, Florence. (1998). Second Language Learning Theories. London & New York: Arnold Prensky, Marc. Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. On the Horizon. 2001, Vol. 9,5. Reynard, Ruth. (2008). Using Chat to Move the Thinking Process Forward. Campus Technology. (Retrieved 5/9 2011) http://campustechnology.com/articles/2008/10/using-chat-to-move-the- thinking-process-forward.aspx The Twitter Experiment. (Retrieved 5/9 2011). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WPVWDkF7U8