Portable Electrical Equipment
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© PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 Document Number: ST037
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Portable Electrical Equipment
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Portable Electrical Equipment
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Portable Electrical Equipment
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Portable Electrical Equipment – ST037 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013
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Portable Electrical Equipment – ST037 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013
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Portable Electrical Equipment - Safety Talk

This Slideshare presentation is a partial preview of the full business document. To view and download the full document, please go here: http://flevy.com/browse/business-document/portable-electrical-equipment-safety-talk-522 Portable electrical equipment is commonly used in industry. Poor maintenance and incorrect use of portable electrical equipment can easily lead to electric shock and fatality. Death or injury from electric shock can result from the following effects of electric current flow on the body: ? contraction of the chest muscles which interferes with breathing; ? temporary paralysis of the nervous system which results in breathing failure; ? interference with the normal rhythm of the heart causing the heart fibres to contract separately and at different times resulting in loss of blood circulation; and ? hemorrhaging and burning of body tissue, nerves and muscles because of heat from the current flow through the body. Injuries from electrical shock are less severe when the current does not pass through the body near nerve centres and vital organs. In most electrical accidents involving portable electrical equipment, the current flows from the hands to the feet past the heart and the lungs with serious and fatal results.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Business      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Portable Electrical Equipment - Safety Talk

  • 1. Portable Electrical Equipment Page 1 of 10 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 Document Number: ST037 Revision 2013 1.0 Portable Electrical Equipment SAFETY AWARENESS KEPT SIMPLE SMARTsafe Safety Talks - ST037 This pack contains: • 7 - Page Talk Text • 7 - OHP Presentation Slide Pack Using the talks (Extract “How to Present Safety Talks”): Plan which topic you want to discuss with your team. Read through the script before you hold the meeting to familiarise yourself with the material. Start the talk with a comment that makes the topic relevant to the team. For example, if you have seen a number of people using ladders incorrectly, use this as your opening comment. Follow the script but don’t read straight from the page. The script is only a prompt and it will sound better if you use your own words. Ask the questions as they appear in the script. It is important you do this because they are a lead in to the next section of your talk. Give the team enough time to answer the questions. Safety talks can be boring for the team if you are the only one talking. Hand out the information sheets as they appear in the script. Don’t hand out all the information sheets at the start of the talk otherwise there is a temptation for the team to read ahead and not listen to the points you are making. Collect the information sheets at the end of the talk so they can be used again. Safety Talk Mini - Delivery Pack To obtain your full Safety Talk Delivery Pack go to: www.smartsafe.com.au The full Safety Talk pack contains MS Office Editable documents : • 7 - Page Talk Text • 7 - OHP Presentation Slide Pack • 14 - A5 talk Handout Sheets • Assessment and Assessment Answers Sheet • Employee Attendance Register • A “How to Present Safety Talks Guide”
  • 2. Portable Electrical Equipment Page 4 of 10 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 Document Number: ST037 Revision 2013 1.0 ELECTRICITY Before we discuss the safe use of portable electrical equipment it is important to understand how electricity works. Electricity flowing through a circuit is like the flow of water through a pipe. Think of this example as we look at three important terms used with electricity. Hand out sheet 1 – Electricity Current can be thought of as the total volume of water flowing past a certain point in a given length of time. Electric current is measured in Amperes but the measurement used in relation to electric shock is the milliAmpere which is one thousandth of an Ampere. Voltage is like the water pressure in a pipeline. Electrical equipment which is powered by 440 Volts or less is considered to be “low voltage”. However, this type of equipment still has the potential to kill since a lethal voltage can be as low as 50 Volts. Most portable electrical equipment and appliances operate at 240 Volts. Resistance is any condition which retards the flow of electricity. This is similar to how the internal pipe wall creates resistance to water flow. Resistance is measured in Ohms. The rate of electrical current flowing through a circuit depends upon the voltage and resistance. The higher the current flow the more likely electric shock or electrocution will occur. ELECTRIC SHOCK The severity of electrical shock is determined by: the amount of current and direction, or path, it takes through the body; and the length of time the body receives the current. As the body is subjected to a higher current flow the more severe the injuries become. A person’s main resistance to current flow is the skin’s surface. Dry skin has a fairly high resistance ranging from 100,000 to 600,000 Ohms. This resistance drops dramatically to about 1000 Ohms when the skin is moist, from perspiration or contact with liquids. Once the skin’s resistance is broken, electrical current flows easily through the blood and the body’s tissue which has a resistance of only 400 to 600 Ohms. This document is a partial preview. Full document download can be found on Flevy: http://flevy.com/browse/document/portable-electrical-equipment-safety-talk-522
  • 3. Portable Electrical Equipment Page 7 of 10 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 Document Number: ST037 Revision 2013 1.0 If the portable electrical tool does not have a current inspection tag do not use it have it inspected, tested and tagged by an electrician. If you find a portable electrical tool with a defect you should not attempt to repair it yourself unless you are a qualified and licensed electrician. All defective portable electrical tools must be inspected by an electrician. RESIDUAL CURRENT DEVICES You should ensure that a portable electrical tool is always connected to Residual Current Device. A Residual Current Device is often called an Earth Leakage Protection unit. If a fault causes electricity to flow to earth, the Residual Current Device will disconnect the electricity supply, avoiding the risk of a fatal shock. Hand out sheet 6 – Residual current devices They operate by continuously comparing the current flow in both the active (supply) and neutral (return) conductors of an electrical circuit. If the current flow becomes unbalanced this means some of the current is leaking to earth. RCDs are designed to disconnect the electricity supply at a level of 30 milliAmps within 10 to 50 milliseconds. The sensitivity and speed of disconnection means that any earth leakage will be detected and automatically switched off before it can cause injury or damage. Residual Current Devices are available in several types such as: switchboard units installed on the main switchboard to provide complete installation protection; power outlet units built in to a standard power outlet to provide single outlet or single circuit protection; or portable units suitable for use with extension cords and portable power tools. If you are unsure if the power outlet you are going to use has built in earth leakage protection, use a portable residual current device. This is connected between the portable electrical tool and the power outlet. Portable Residual Current Devices must be checked at least every three months by a licenced electrician to ensure it disconnects the electricity at 30 milliAmps as per the AS 3760 In-Service Safety Inspection & Testing of Electrical Equipment. Depending on the workplace, the frequency of testing may need to be increased. (See Further References at the end of the talk). This document is a partial preview. Full document download can be found on Flevy: http://flevy.com/browse/document/portable-electrical-equipment-safety-talk-522
  • 4. Portable Electrical Equipment Page 10 of 10 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 Document Number: ST037 Revision 2013 1.0 LICENCE AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITY Under copyright laws, the documentation may not be copied, photocopied, reproduced, translated or reduced to any electronic medium or machine-readable form, in whole or in part or sold or distributed without the prior written consent of PA Services Group Pty Ltd. SMARTsafe is a registered trademark of the PA Services Group. Copyright 2013 PA Services Group Pty Ltd GPO Box 924, Brisbane QLD 4001 www.smartsafe.com.au Email: info@smartsafe.com.au Under no circumstances shall PA Services Group Pty Ltd or associated Companies be liable for any loss, damage or injury (including without limitation any loss of profit, indirect, consequential or incremental loss, damage or injury) arising from the supply of this TALK or use of the MATERIAL and any accompanying written materials or any failure by PA Services Group Pty Ltd or trademarks products branded SMARTsafe perform any obligation or observe any terms of this agreement. By using this material the Purchaser agrees to the above terms. The laws of Australia govern this agreement. The artwork “IMAGES” in the Safety Talks are incorporated for viewing purposes. Reproducing the “IMAGES” in other documents or transferring them in electronic form is a breach of third party copyright. The “IMAGES” used in this material are drawn from photo stock and other sources. PA Services Group Pty Ltd has the right to make periodic changes, additions and deletions to the material and products described within the publications without notice. DISCLAIMER The information presented in the Safety Talks has been compiled from sources believed reliable. However it cannot be assumed that all acceptable measures are contained within the talk nor that other additional measures may not be required under particular, specific or exceptional circumstances and that your company, manufactures or statutory procedures and rules may apply and take precedence over this material. This document is a partial preview. Full document download can be found on Flevy: http://flevy.com/browse/document/portable-electrical-equipment-safety-talk-522
  • 5. Portable Electrical Equipment – ST037 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 10 milliAmps - muscular contractions making it difficult to release grip on the electrical conductor. 20 milliAmps - severe muscular contractions making it difficult to breathe. 50 milliAmps - severe breathing difficulties or breathing stopped. 70 to 200 milliAmps - erratic heart motion resulting in loss of blood circulation. 400 milliAmps - burns at the entry and exit points of the electrical current flow path. Sheet 2 – Effects of Electrical Current Flow This document is a partial preview. Full document download can be found on Flevy: http://flevy.com/browse/document/portable-electrical-equipment-safety-talk-522
  • 6. Portable Electrical Equipment – ST037 © PA Services Group - SMARTsafe 2013 SignaturePlant Number Owner Licence NumberEquipment type Test Date COMPLETE WHERE APPLICABLE PLEASE INFORM YOUR ELECTRICAL SERVICES IF THIS APPLIANCE IS DEFECTIVE IN ANY WAY January to March April to June July to September October to December Each portable electrical tool should be fitted with a current inspection tag. (Relevant to your tagging standards) RED: GREEN: BLUE: YELLOW: Sheet 5 – Electrical Inspection Tags This document is a partial preview. Full document download can be found on Flevy: http://flevy.com/browse/document/portable-electrical-equipment-safety-talk-522
  • 7. 1 Flevy (www.flevy.com) is the marketplace for premium documents. These documents can range from Business Frameworks to Financial Models to PowerPoint Templates. Flevy was founded under the principle that companies waste a lot of time and money recreating the same foundational business documents. Our vision is for Flevy to become a comprehensive knowledge base of business documents. All organizations, from startups to large enterprises, can use Flevy— whether it's to jumpstart projects, to find reference or comparison materials, or just to learn. Contact Us Please contact us with any questions you may have about our company. • General Inquiries support@flevy.com • Media/PR press@flevy.com • Billing billing@flevy.com

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