Shock Value: Rid Yourself of a Rough Ride with New Shocks and Struts
Got yourself a low-rider, but no one pimped your ride...
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NAPA Shock Value

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NAPA Shock Value

  • 1. Shock Value: Rid Yourself of a Rough Ride with New Shocks and Struts Got yourself a low-rider, but no one pimped your ride to scuff the street? That’s just one of the signs your car might need a new set of shocks or struts. Up-to-snuff shock absorbers surely make our time spent on the road more pleasant by keeping the vehicle from bouncing, while struts ensure our ride is stable (not “floating” all over the road) and keep the tires stay planted on the pavement. When either are worn or compromised, the vehicle will be harder to control, will bounce more on bumps and potholes, will nose dive and will even take longer to stop. How do I know when I need new shocks or struts? The visual evidence of damaged or worn shocks and struts includes: shock- or strut-oil leakage; dented or damaged housings; and uneven tire wear or cupping. Driving-related situations revealing faulty shock absorbers/struts include:  Excessive rough-surface bounce or “bottoming out”  Vibrations (including steering-wheel vibrations, rocking and rattling)  Veering in side winds  Swerving in reaction to road conditions or steering activity  Traction loss while accelerating, braking or cornering  Nose-dives during braking  Tire noise What parts do I need to replace shocks or struts? Because replacing shocks is easier than replacing struts, let’s focus on that task here. To replace your shocks, you’ll need:  A new set of shocks  Floor jack View complete article online 

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