Sheep Farming
1. Introduction
Sheep with its multi-facet utility for wool, meat, milk,
skins and manure, form an important...
3.Financial assistance for sheep farming
Loan from banks with refinance facility from NABARD is available for starting she...
Financial:
a. Unit Cost - The average cost of Sheep unit.
b. Input cost for feed and fodder, veterinary aid, insurance, et...
8.6 Insurance:
The animals and other assets (shed, equipment) may be insured.
9. Economics of Sheep Farming
A model econom...
B. Techno-economic Parameters
SL.No. Parameters
1 Cost of one year Ram (in Rs.) 5500
2 Cost of one year Ewe (in Rs.) 4500
...
Year Batch No of animals in begining of
the year
No of
lambs born
No of Deaths No of animals
culled
No of lambs
sold
Total...
C. Cash flow statement
Years
Expenditure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Cost of feed in Rs.
Sheep
Female adult 77315 73449.25 166227.25 935...
Gross profit 9750 125131.9 346359.35 244414.35 267615.75 508572.9 238279.1
Capital Expenditure 771677.6
Salvage value 7190...
Capital cost 771677.6
Salvage value 719000
Net profit -762902.6 101169.9 287723.6 205400.25 226979.25 1151805.5 201606.9
I...
of 9

Nabard Sheep Farming Project

Sheep with its multi-facet utility for wool, meat, milk, skins and manure, form an important component of rural economy particularly in the arid, semi-arid and mountainous areas of the country. It provides a dependable source of income to the shepherds through sale of wool and animals.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Small Business & Entrepreneurship      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nabard Sheep Farming Project

  • 1. Sheep Farming 1. Introduction Sheep with its multi-facet utility for wool, meat, milk, skins and manure, form an important component of rural economy particularly in the arid, semi-arid and mountainous areas of the country. It provides a dependable source of income to the shepherds through sale of wool and animals. The advantages of sheep farming are: a. Sheep do not need expensive buildings to house them and on the other hand require less labour than other kinds of livestock. b. The foundation stock are relatively cheap and the flock can be multiplied rapidly. c. Sheep are economical converter of grass into meat and wool. d. Sheep will eat varied kinds of plants compared to other kind of livestock. This makes them excellent weed destroyer. e. Unlike goats, sheep hardly damage any tree f. The production of wool, meat and manure provides three different sources of income to the shepherd. g. The structure of their lips helps them to clean grains lost at harvest time and thus convert waste feed into profitable products. h. Mutton is one kind of meat towards which there is no prejudice by any community in India and further development of superior breeds for mutton production will have a great scope in the developing economy of India. 2. Scope for Sheep Farming and its National Importance The country has 71.6 million sheep as per 2012-13 annual report of Animal Husbandry Department and ranks sixth in the world. The contribution of sheep through export of meat is 8 per cent of the total export value of agricultural and processed food products. Sheep skin in the form of leather and leather products is also exported. Sheep make a valuable contribution to the livelihood of the economically weaker sections of the society. Amongst the livestock owners the shepherds are the poorest of the lot.
  • 2. 3.Financial assistance for sheep farming Loan from banks with refinance facility from NABARD is available for starting sheep farming. For obtaining bank loan, the farmers should apply to the nearest branch of a Commercial, Co-operative or Regional Rural Bank in their area in the prescribed application form which is available in the branches of financing bank. The Technical officer attached to or the Manager of the bank can help / give guidance to the farmers in preparing the project report to obtain bank loan. For sheep development schemes with very large outlays, detailed reports will have to be prepared. For high value projects, the borrowers can utilise the services of NABARD Consultancy Services (NABCONS) who are having wide experience in preparation of Detailed Project Reports. 4. Scheme Formulation A scheme can be prepared by a beneficiary after consulting local technical persons of State Animal Husbandry Department, DRDA, Sheep Development Corporation, Sheep Co-operative society / union / federation and commercial farmers. If possible, the beneficiaries should also visit progressive sheep farmers and government / agricultural university Sheep farms in the vicinity and discuss the profitability of sheep farming. A good practical training and experience in sheep farming will be highly desirable. The sheep co-operative societies established in the villages as a result of efforts by the Animal Husbandry/Sheep Development Department of State Government / Sheep Development Board would provide all supporting facilities, particularly marketing of live animals and wool. 5. Requirements of a Good Project The project should include the following information on technical, financial and managerial aspects in detail based on type of unit and capacity. Technical: a. Nearness of the selected area to veterinary centres and wool collection centre and the financing bank's branch b. Availability of good quality animals in nearby livestock markets c. Source of training facilities. d. Availability of good grazing ground / lands. e. Availability of green/dry fodder, concentrate feed, medicines etc. f. Availability of veterinary aid and marketing facilities near the scheme area.
  • 3. Financial: a. Unit Cost - The average cost of Sheep unit. b. Input cost for feed and fodder, veterinary aid, insurance, etc. c. Output costs i.e. sale price of animals, penning etc. d. Income-expenditure statement and annual gross surplus. e. Cash flow analysis. f. Repayment schedule i.e. repayment of principal loan amount and interest. 6. Appraisal of the project The project so formulated considering the above mentioned aspects should be submitted to the nearest branch of the bank for availing credit facility for establishment of the sheep farm. The bank will then examine the project for its technical feasibility, financial viability and bankability. 7. Sanction of Bank Loan and its Disbursement After ensuring technical feasibility and economic viability, the scheme will be sanctioned by the bank. The loan is disbursed in stages against creation of specific assets such as construction of sheds, purchase of equipments and animals. The end use of the loan is verified and constant follow-up is done by the bank. 8. Lending Terms - General 8.1 Outlay: Outlay of the project depends on the local conditions, unit size and the investment components included in the project. Prevailing market prices / cost may be considered to arrive at the outlay. 8.2 Margin Money: Margin depends on the category of the borrowers and may range from 10% to 25%. 8.3 Interest Rate: Banks are free to decide the interest rates within overall RBI guidelines. However, for working out financial viability and bankability of model project, the rate of interest is assumed at 12.00% p.a. 8.4 Security: Security will be as per RBI / NABARD guidelines issued from time to time. 8.5 Repayment of loan: The loan repayment is determined, on the basis of gross surplus generated in the project. Usually the repayment period of loan for sheep farming is 6 to 8 years.
  • 4. 8.6 Insurance: The animals and other assets (shed, equipment) may be insured. 9. Economics of Sheep Farming A model economics for sheep farming with a unit size of 100 sheep is given below. This is indicative and the applicable input and output costs and the parameters observed at the field level may be incorporated. A. Project Cost Amount in Rs. I Land and Building Cost 1 Land fencing and partitioning a Fencing for compound 850 R Ft @ Rs. 15 per R Ft. in 5 rows 12750 b Gates 5000 Total 17750 2 Civil structures Shed @ 10 sq.ft for ewe,20 sq.ft for ram and 4 Sq.ft for kid 100 ewes,4 rams and assuming 120 lambs maximum (10*100)+(20*4)+(4*110)= 1520 Sqft @ Rs. 100 per sq.ft 152000 Total 152000 3 Equipment a First aid equipments 1000 Feeders and waterers 10400 Total 11400 II Animals a Ewes 100 @ Rs 4500 per animal- 9-12 months age 450000 b Rams 4 @ Rs. 5500 per animal - 12-15 months age 22000 Total 472000 III Working Capital a Feed Adult female 77315 Adult male 3093 Kids 12600 Medicines 6800 Insurance 18720 Total of III 118528 TFO 771678 Bank Loan 578758.2 Margin Money 192919
  • 5. B. Techno-economic Parameters SL.No. Parameters 1 Cost of one year Ram (in Rs.) 5500 2 Cost of one year Ewe (in Rs.) 4500 3 Cost of male lamb (in Rs.) 4500 4 Cost of female lamb (in Rs.) 4000 5 Adult mortality 5% 6 Lamb mortality 15% 7 Culling rate among ewes 20% 8 Cost of concentrate feed (in Rs.) 12.00/kg 9 Insurance 4% 10 Sale price of adult ewe (in Rs.) 4500 11 Sale price of adult ram (in Rs.) 5000 12 Lambing 80% 13 Rate of interest 12% 14 Interlambing period in months 9 15 Medicine cost/year (in Rs.) Doe/ewe/buck 50 Kid 20 16 Cost of skin of dead animal (in Rs.) Adult 150 Kid 100 17 Income from manure (in Rs.) Adult 75 Kid 25 Feed consumption in Kg Green Dry Concentrate Cost per animal Ewe 547.5 365 11.2 773.15 Ram 547.5 365 8.4 739.55 Male lamb 54 22.5 9 157.5 Female lamb 54 22.5 9 157.5 Cost of feed 0.5 1 12
  • 6. Year Batch No of animals in begining of the year No of lambs born No of Deaths No of animals culled No of lambs sold Total disposed No of animals retained at the end of the year Adults Lambs Adults Lambs Adults Adults Lambs Adults Lambs M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F M F 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 I 4 100 0 0 40 40 0 5 6 6 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 6 4 95 34 34 II 4 95 34 34 43 43 0 5 6 6 0 0 33 20 0 5 39 26 5 104 37 37 III A 5 104 37 37 47 47 1 5 7 7 0 0 36 25 1 5 43 32 6 111 40 40 B 6 111 40 40 50 50 0 0 7 7 2 10 39 20 2 10 46 27 5 121 43 43 IV 5 121 43 43 54 54 0 6 8 8 1 20 42 23 1 26 50 31 5 115 46 46 V 5 115 46 46 52 52 1 6 8 8 0 20 45 25 1 26 53 33 5 110 44 44 VI C 5 110 44 44 50 50 0 6 7 7 0 0 44 34 0 6 51 41 5 114 43 43 D 5 114 43 43 51 51 0 0 8 8 2 20 42 30 2 20 50 38 4 107 43 43 VII 4 107 43 43 48 48 0 5 7 7 1 0 42 40 1 5 49 47 5 105 41 41
  • 7. C. Cash flow statement Years Expenditure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Cost of feed in Rs. Sheep Female adult 77315 73449.25 166227.25 93551.15 88912.25 173185.6 82727.05 Male adult 3092.6 3092.6 8504.65 3865.75 3865.75 7731.5 3092.6 Lambs 12600 13466.25 30476.25 17151.75 16301.25 31752 15167.25 Cost of medicines for adults 5200 4950 11300 6300 6000 11700 5550 Cost of medicines for kids 1600 1710 3870 2178 2070 4032 1926 Wages and salaries 0 0 0 0 0 0 Insurance 18720 17820 19620 22680 21600 20700 19980 Interest on Cash credit 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Capitalised Cost 118527.6 Total 0 114488.1 239998.15 145726.65 138749.25 249101.1 128442.9 Income Sale of kids in Rs. Male lamb 0 148500 337500 189000 202500 387000 189000 Female lamb 0 80000 180000 92000 100000 256000 160000 Sale of culls Male 0 0 10000 5000 0 10000 5000 Female 0 0 45000 90000 90000 90000 0 Sale of skins 1950 1995 3832.5 2541 2565 3849 2247 Sale of manure 7800 9125 10025 11600 11300 10825 10475 Insurance claims 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9750 239620 586357.5 390141 406365 757674 366722
  • 8. Gross profit 9750 125131.9 346359.35 244414.35 267615.75 508572.9 238279.1 Capital Expenditure 771677.6 Salvage value 719000 Net profit -761927.6 125131.9 346359.35 244414.35 267615.75 508572.9 957279.1 DF 0.869 0.756 0.658 0.571 0.497 0.432 0.375 PW of Benefits 15 % DF 8472.75 181152.72 385823.24 222770.51 201963.41 327315.17 407145.75 PW of Costs at 15 %DF 670587.8344 86553.004 157918.78 83209.917 68958.377 107611.68 48166.088 BCR at 15 % 1.418344633 IRR 0.336055467 NPW at 15 % 511637.86 Int rate on TL 0.12 Cash accrual 9750 125131.9 346359.35 244414.35 267615.75 508572.9 238279.1 Loan amount 578758.2 578758.2 578758.2 428758.2 328758.2 228758.2 0 Interest 34725.492 69450.984 69450.984 51450.984 39450.984 27450.984 0 Repayment Interest 0 104176.48 69450.984 51450.984 39450.984 27450.984 0 Principal 0 0 150000 100000 100000 228758.2 0 Total 0 104176.48 219450.98 151450.98 139450.98 256209.18 0 Cash after repayment 9750 20955.424 126908.37 92963.366 128164.77 252363.72 238279.1 DSCR 1.2011531 1.5782994 1.6138182 1.9190668 1.9849909 Avg DSCR 1.65946567 Sensitivity analysis Total costs 0 114488.1 239998.15 145726.65 138749.25 249101.1 128442.9 Total Benefits 8775 215658 527721.75 351126.9 365728.5 681906.6 330049.8
  • 9. Capital cost 771677.6 Salvage value 719000 Net profit -762902.6 101169.9 287723.6 205400.25 226979.25 1151805.5 201606.9 IRR 0.304711445

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