POLITICS, PAISA OR PRIORITIES
WHERE DO CHILDREN FIT INTO THE
2015-16 UNION BUDGET?
HAQ: CENTRE FOR CHILD RIGHTS
B1/2, Grou...
1
Children constitute 39 per cent of India’s
population and home to 20 per cent of
the world's child population. However,
...
2
Budget for children reduced by
29 %
22% reduction in health related
schemes for children
25% reduction in overall educat...
3
There is reduction in some of the flagship schemes for children.
Is this rhetoric or promises to keep?
Mr. Arun Jaitley ...
4
Share of BfC
3.26
Share of Other
than BfC
96.74
Share of BfC in Union Budget 2015-2016 (per cent)
Although there has bee...
5
0.04
0.51
2.58 0.13
0.002
BfC Sectoral share in Union Budget
2015-2016 (per cent)
Health
Development
Education
Protectio...
6
0
5000
10000
15000
20000
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Allocation in Child Development(2015-
2016)
(Rs.Crore)
...
7
Implementation of ICDS
The number of operational Anganwadi Centres (AWCs) has increased by 29% between
March 2009 and Ma...
8
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
60000
70000
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Allocation in Child Education(2015-
...
9
0
2000
4000
6000
8000
10000
12000
14000
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Mid Day Meal
BE
RE
The gap between expen...
10
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016
Allocation in Child Protection (2015-2016)
(R...
11
In February 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved the
continuation of ICPS in the XII Plan with enha...
12
S.No Name of State/UT No. of Districts CWCs JJBs
1 Andaman & Nicobar island 3 1 1
2
Andhra Pradesh (including
Telangana...
13
The Standing Committee Report also provided details of pendency of cases in these
statutory bodies.
(a): State-wise Pen...
14
SAFE INDIA
SKILL INDIA
GREEN INDIA
MAKE IN INDIA
BUT WHERE IS CHILDREN’S INDIA MR. FM?
HAQ: Centre for Child Rights, ba...
of 15

Politics, Paisa Or Priorities Where Do Children Fit Into The 2015-16 Union Budget?

Children constitute 39 per cent of India’s population and home to 20 per cent of the world's child population. However, the outcome indicators for children show huge deficiencies at present and they can be addressed only with enhanced allocation and expenditure under different child welfare programmes. HAQ: Center for Child Rights B1/2, Ground Floor, Malviya Nagar New Delhi - 110017 Tel: +91-26677412,26673599 Fax: +91-26674688 Website: www.haqcrc.org FaceBook Page: https://www.facebook.com/HaqCentreForChildRights
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Politics, Paisa Or Priorities Where Do Children Fit Into The 2015-16 Union Budget?

  • 1. POLITICS, PAISA OR PRIORITIES WHERE DO CHILDREN FIT INTO THE 2015-16 UNION BUDGET? HAQ: CENTRE FOR CHILD RIGHTS B1/2, Ground Floor, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi – 110017 Phone: 011-26673599, 26677412; Fax: 011-26674688 Website: www.haqcrc.org; E-mail: info@haqcrc.org With support from Child Rights and You (CRY)
  • 2. 1 Children constitute 39 per cent of India’s population and home to 20 per cent of the world's child population. However, the outcome indicators for children show huge deficiencies at present and they can be addressed only with enhanced allocation and expenditure under different child welfare programmes. The government has been highlighting its priority areas for the budget and has talked about significant tax reforms, smart cities, skill development, women’s security, budget for the social sector, among other things. HAQ’s budget for children analysis for the last 15 years shows that children have never received more than 5 per cent of the total Union Budget allocation. In 2014-15, out of every 100 Rupees allocated in the Union Budget, the share of children was only 4 rupees and 52 paise. The Union Budget 2015-16 is the second opportunity for the BJP led government in the Centre to take its development agenda forward and show its commitment to children. This is also the time when countries are making their commitments to the Post 2015 Agenda for the Sustainable Development Goals. How will these commitments translate into financial commitments in the budget so that India can keep on track for achieving these goals? Close to one-third of the world's extreme poor are concentrated in India. Children remain the most vulnerable. “Eradication of poverty and special attention to children needs to be central to the post-2015 Development Agenda”. Bhagwant Bishnoi, India's Permanent Representative to the UN The Key Concerns based on budget 2014-15 were: While the overall budget allocations increased by 7.78 per cent as against the previous year, share of children dipped from 4.64 per cent in 2013-14 to 4.52 per cent in 2014-15. Low allocations for protection and health Despite heavy allocation for School Education, it failed to address critical issues Inadequate allocation and under-utilisation in flagship schemes In this context the Key Policy Asks for Children in People’s Budget Initiative Augment resources for Children’s Schemes in Union Budget 2015-16 to bring about an improvement in outcome indicators of children Give child protection concerns top priority and increase allocations to strengthen protection systems Step-up investments under Restructured ICDS for addressing the rights of the young under- served children, & convert all Anganwadi Centres into Day Care Centres Initiate measures to check under-spending in schemes for children and ensure timely disbursement of funds Link outlays for child rights schemes to outcomes by adding suitable heads to Outcome Budget document that focus on improvements in outcomes of various schemes
  • 3. 2 Budget for children reduced by 29 % 22% reduction in health related schemes for children 25% reduction in overall education schemes for children SHOCKING! BUDGET 2015-16 FAILS CHILDREN REDUCED ALLOCATIONS FOR CHILDREN IN BUDGET 2015- 2016 Just as the world community through the UN Human Rights Council is declaring its commitment towards better investment in the rights of the Child1, it is ironic to see India, which was one of the few countries to have recognized the importance of Child Budgeting, step back on its commitment through its reduced allocations for children. Key Observations The share allocation for children in the 2015-16 has gone down to a little over 3 percent of the total budget. It was 4.52 per cent in 2014-15. In fact there has been a consistent decline in the share for children in the budget over the years. Despite the fall in allocations in the education sector, it continues to receive the largest share of the Budget for Children (BfC). Protection continues to receive the smallest share but there is a minuscule increase in the Integrated Child Protection Scheme. 1 Towards better investment in the rights of the child .Report of the United Nations High Commissioner of Human Rights. 19 December 2014. A/HRC/28/33. Where is your Commitment to Children Mr. FM? Madam Speaker, I hope to garner some additional resources during the year from tax buoyancy. If I am successful, then over and above the budgetary allocation, I will endeavour to enhance allocations to MGNREGA by INR 5,000 crore; Integrated Child Development Scheme (ICDS) by INR 1,500 crore; Integrated Child Protection Scheme (ICPS) by INR 500 crore; …..(para 55) In spite of the large increase in devolution to states, which implies reduced fiscal space for the Centre in the same proportion we are committed to the welfare of the poor and the neo-middle class. Keeping this in mind, adequate provision is being made for the schemes for the poor and the dis-advantaged. Illustratively, I have allocated INR 68,968 crore to the education sector including mid-day meals, INR 33,152 crore to the health sector and INR 79,526 crore for rural development activities including MGNREGA, INR 22,407 crore for housing and urban development, INR 10,351 crore for women and child development…(para 84) Shri Arun Jaitley, Budget Speech 2015-16 The reality is … The Honourable Finance Minister has reduced the Budget of Ministry of Women and Child Development by 51% (from INR 21193.88 crores to INR 10382.4 Crores).
  • 4. 3 There is reduction in some of the flagship schemes for children. Is this rhetoric or promises to keep? Mr. Arun Jaitley said, “Educating and skilling our youth to enable them to get employment is the altar before which we must all bow. To ensure that there is a senior secondary school within 5 km reach of each child, we need to upgrade over 80,000 secondary schools and add or upgrade 75,000 junior/middle, to the senior secondary level. We also have to ensure that education improves in terms of quality and learning outcomes.” His allocation for education shows otherwise. Scheme Percentage Fall in Allocation Sarva Shiksha Abhiyaan -20.74 Mid- day meal Scheme -30.11 Rashtriya Madhayamik Shiksha Abhiyaan -28.70 Scheme for Setting up of 6000 model School at Block Level As bench mark of Excellence -99.92 Support to Education including teacher training -36.55 There is a fall in allocations in some other important schemes for children too: Scheme Percentage Fall in Allocation Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) -54.19 Deendayal Disabled Rehabilitation Scheme -33.33 Manufacture of Sera Vaccine -18.03 NRHM-RCH Flexible Pool -21.63 National Programme for Youth and Development -28.75 Scheme for prevention of Alcoholism and substance(drug) abuse -66.81 Mr. Jaitley recognized that “Good health is a necessity for both quality of life, and a person’s productivity and ability to support his or her family”- how then does he justify the falling allocations for health programmes? Despite his stated commitments to the most marginalised we see reduction in even the small funded programmes for SC and ST and Minorities Mr. Jaitley said: “…Being sensitive to the needs of the poor, under-privileged and the disadvantaged, my Government also remains committed to the ongoing welfare schemes for the SCs, STs and Women”. And yet we see budget cuts in schemes for SC, ST and minorities: Scheme Percentage Fall in Allocation Pre-Matric Scholarship of Minorities -5.45 Post -Matric Scholarship for Minorities -3.07 Upgradation of merit of SC Students -20.41 Incentives to children of vulnerable groups among SC -75 Some welcome increases: It is heartening to see a 43 per cent increase in progamme addressing child labour. Is that the result of the Nobel Prize to work on child labour? 65 per cent increase in Rajeev Gandhi National Crèche Scheme
  • 5. 4 Share of BfC 3.26 Share of Other than BfC 96.74 Share of BfC in Union Budget 2015-2016 (per cent) Although there has been a decrease in allocation for Deendayal Disabled Rehabilitation Scheme, there is small increase in the scheme for Aids and Appliances for Handicapped. BUDGET FOR CHILDREN IN DETAIL In 2007, Statement 22 was introduced in the Budget listing out the schemes and programmes for children. This was recognition of Budget for Children. This analysis is based on Statement 22, Volume 2 of the Expenditure Budget. Children have received a little over 3 per cent of the total budget in 2015-16. This has gone down from the already minimal 4.52 per cent in the 2014-15 budget. What is more there has been a consistent fall in the share of children (BfC) over the years raising concerns about the government’s political commitment to children of India. Share of BfC in Union Budget Year BE RE 2012-2013 4.76 4.69 2013-2014 4.64 4.56 2014-2015 4.52 4.16 2015-2016 3.26 NA
  • 6. 5 0.04 0.51 2.58 0.13 0.002 BfC Sectoral share in Union Budget 2015-2016 (per cent) Health Development Education Protection Other than BfC 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 2012-20132013-20142014-20152015-2016 Allocation in Child Health in (2015-2016) (Rs.Crore) BE RE ALLOCATION FOR SECTORS The schemes and programmes listed in Statement 22 have been divided into four sectors. As always, despite the reduction in overall allocation for children, education sector has received the lion’s share with protection receiving the lowest. This is true of the distribution both within the Union Budget and the Budget for Children. All sectoral shares, except protection have seen a fall. Sectoral Share in Union Budget Year Health BE Development BE Education BE Protection BE Other than BfC 2012-13 0.18 1.10 3.44 0.04 95.24 2013-14 0.16 1.10 3.34 0.03 95.36 2014-15 0.16 1.06 3.26 0.04 95.48 2015-16 0.13 0.51 2.58 0.04 96.74 HEALTH In 2015-16 the share of health sector for children is just 0.13 per cent.2 Over the years there has been a decline in the share of health for children. How can this be justified in the context of the situation of health of children? Infant mortality in India is 42 per thousand births3, main reasons for which are early childhood diseases and childbirth-related causes. A huge number of children die every year from preventable diseases and infections. In the absence of a sound public health care system 2 Statement 22, Expenditure Budget Volume II, Union Budget 2015-16 3 http://censusindia.gov.in/vital_statistics/SRS_Bulletins/SRS_Bulletin-September_2013.pdf 3.93 15.66 79.12 1.21 Sectoral share within BfC 2015- 2016 (per cent) Health Development Education Protection
  • 7. 6 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Allocation in Child Development(2015- 2016) (Rs.Crore) BE RE delivering services for children, it is not possible to improve child health outcomes, particularly for the poor. It must be noted that India is far from reaching the WHO standard of 3 per cent expenditure of its GDP on health as currently the overall public health expenditure in India is just 1.2 per cent of its GDP. Moreover, time has come to review the appropriateness of the allocations being made. Though NRHM has been successful in reaching affordable healthcare services to the rural population, there are problems like underutilization of the well-built infrastructure, either due to bad location of the centre or due to lack of transport/residential facilities for doctors and other staff, safety of women, and shortage of qualified doctors and nurses. There is also a need to consider PPP in this sector with careful regulatory oversight.4 This is bound to have an impact on children’s health status. DEVELOPMENT Development sector has been allocated 0.51 per cent of the Union Budget in 2015-16. This share has gone down from 1.06 per cent in 2014-15. As per NFHS -3, in India, one in every three children in the age group of 0-3 years is suffering from under weight. Census 2011, reports nearly 89 million children in the age group 0-3 years and with the 40 per cent prevalence of underweight, 35.6 million among them are underweight children.5 The ICDS is the largest programme run by the MoWCD. In FY 2015-16, ICDS accounted for 87.39 percent of the Ministry of Women and Child Development’s budget and 91.46 per cent of the child development sector budget. ICDS in mission mode had estimated a budget of INR 28454 crore in 2015-16 for implementation of the scheme6. Taking the 2015-16 budget into account, there was a shortfall of INR 20118 crore. This gap should be filled up to achieve the target of universalization promised to the country. For this an allocation of at least INR 28454 crore is needed7. In this context how does the government justify the decreased allocation of 54.19 per cent for ICDS? 4 Economic Survey of India 2013-2014 5 Millenium Development Goals – India Country Report 2015 6 “ICDS Mission: The Broad Framework for Implementation”; Ministry of Women and Child Development; Pg No. 46; http://wcd.nic.in/icdsimg/icds_english_03-12-2013.pdf 7 Ibid
  • 8. 7 Implementation of ICDS The number of operational Anganwadi Centres (AWCs) has increased by 29% between March 2009 and March 2014. However, the number of beneficiaries per AWC continues to be high. As of March 2014, 1 functioning AWC provided supplementary nutrition to 68 children. The number of children per AWC was the highest in Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, with 1 AWC feeding 193 and 101 children, respectively. Vacancy rates for Anganwadi Workers (AWW) and Anganwadi Helpers (AWH) have improved since March 2011. As of March 2014, only 5% of AWW posts were vacant. As of March 2014, 31% of Child Development Project Officer (CDPO)/Assistant Child Development Project Officer (ADPO) posts and 30% of supervisor posts were vacant across India. As of March 2014, 28% of ICDS beneficiaries (children) in India were malnourished. This is an improvement from March 2011, when 41% were reported malnourished. Source: http://www.accountabilityindia.in/sites/default/files/icds_pre_budget_2015.pdf 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 18000 20000 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Integrated Child Development Scheme (Rs.crore) BE RE ICDS in its universalization and in its third phase of expansion is facing many challenges such as inadequate availability of space for Anganwadi Centres (AWCs), vacant posts, low focus on growth monitoring, low focus on early childhood etc.8 With respect to malnourishment rates amongst ICDS beneficiaries, between March 2011 and March 2014, the malnourishment levels amongst ICDS beneficiaries dropped by 13 percentage points from 41 percent to 28 percent. 9 Taking up restructured ICDS in mission mode needs additional investment 10 as it needs to bring in its fold the children who get left out of the system at present (e.g. migrants, transients). The provisions for reaching underserved and unreached tribal settlements need to be revisited, and requires specific budgetary allocations. 8 http://www.accountabilityindia.in/sites/default/files/icds_pre_budget_2015.pdf 9 Ibid. 10 Investment in construction of more than 2 lakh Anganwadis; more than 2700 new technical human resource; more than 4.5 lakh additional Anganwadi workers/nutrition counsellors/link workers;70,000 Anganwadi cum crèches; improved supplementary nutrition, intensive monitoring, training and capacity building; greater convergence and linkages with other sectors
  • 9. 8 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Allocation in Child Education(2015- 2016) (Rs.Crore) BE RE GOI’s allocations for SSA are primarily funded by a 2 percent education cess, called the Prarambhik Shiksha Kosh (PSK). PSK is a tax-on tax paid by the public. In FY 2010–11, 50 percent of funds for SSA came from the PSK. In FY 2014- 15 this increased to 67 per cent. . The Twelfth Five Year Plan, approved INR 1,23,580 crore for strengthening and restructuring of the ICDS.11 EDUCATION Education receives the largest share of allocation both within the Union Budget (2.28 Per cent) as well as BfC (79. 12 per cent). However, there has been a reduction in the share of allocation for education (elementary and secondary). This is because of fall in allocation for some of the major schemes such as the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, Mid-day Meal and Rashtriya Madhyamik Shiksha Abhiyan. How is this justified in the context of the findings of the ASER Reports and the National Achievement Surveys which have been highlighting low learning-achievement levels in school, problem of retention and dropout at secondary education, lack of infrastructure in schools, dysfunctional toilets and taps, dearth of trained teachers, and violation of RTE norms? The allocation for school education 2015-2016 is reduced by 21.72 per cent in 2015-16 (It is INR 458250.70 crore as against INR 58544.42 crore in 2014-15). Sarva Shiksha Abhiyaan The allocation for Sarva Shiksha Abhiyaan(SSA) is decreased by 20.74 per cent (from 27758 crore in 2014-2015 to 22000 crore in 2015-2016) According to Accountability Initiative in FY 2010-11, per-student12 SSA allocation (excluding UTs) stood at INR 3,511. This increased nearly 2-fold to INR 5,596 in FY 2012–13. In FY 2014- 15, per-student allocations (using enrolment numbers for 2013) dropped to INR 4,503.13 In FY 2010–11, 70 per cent of total allocations were spent. This dropped to 63 percent in FY 2012–13 and increased to 81 percent in FY 2013- 14. In FY 2014-15, by September 2014, 32 per cent of total SSA allocations had been spent.14 11 Economic Survey of India 2012-13 12 Per student SSA allocations (including GOI and state share) are calculated by dividing the total allocation by the number of children enrolled in government schools. 13 http://www.accountabilityindia.in/sites/default/files/ssa_pre_budget_2015.pdf 14 http://www.accountabilityindia.in/sites/default/files/ssa_pre_budget_2015.pdf
  • 10. 9 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Mid Day Meal BE RE The gap between expenditure and allocations has decreased. However, this is largely due to the reduction in allocations rather than significant improvements in state-level absorption capacity:15 In FY 2013-14, the teacher component accounted for 64 per cent of the total SSA approved allocations and 91 per cent of allocated funds were spent. In contrast, schools accounted for 15 per cent of approved allocations and only 61 per cent was spent. Rashtriya Madhyamik Shiksha Abhiyan (RMSA) RMSA is the Government of India’s (GOI) flagship secondary education programme. The scheme was launched in March 2009 to augment access to and quality of secondary education. While the secondary education allocations had increased from INR 5,757 crore in FY 2009-10 to INR 11,847 crore in FY 2014-15, correspondingly, allocations for RMSA had increased nearly 10-fold during the same period. However, 2015-16 budget saw decrease of 28.70 per cent in the allocation for this scheme. Even as allocations for RMSA have grown significantly over time, the capability of the implementation structure to absorb these funds remains a problem. The scheme has suffered from several problems with respect to fund flows. In FY 2010- 11, only 30 per cent of approved GOI share had been released. However, the rate of releases has improved of late. In FY 2014-15, GOI had released 51% of its approved share by November 2014. There are delays in spending. Of the total funds available with states, only 50 per cent were spent in FY 2013-14. There are also significant state variations. As of September 2014, Uttar Pradesh had spent 69 per cent of its available funds while West Bengal spent a mere 8 per cent 16 Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) and Net Enrolment Ratio (NER) continue to be low. In 2013, the national GER stood at 77 and NER at 46. In 2013, 79 per cent of boys and 80 per cent of girls passed the Class X exams. The annual dropout rate for Class IX and X was 14.5 per cent in 2012. Mid Day Meal Mid day meal scheme too observed a decline of 30.11 per cent in its allocation (from 13215.00 crore in 2014-2015 to 9236.40 crore in 2015-2016) 15 ibid 16 http://www.accountabilityindia.in/sites/default/files/rmsa_pre_budget_2015.pdf
  • 11. 10 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Allocation in Child Protection (2015-2016) (Rs.Crore) BE RE 0 100 200 300 400 500 2012-2013 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016 Integrated Child Protection Scheme BE RE GOI mandates that by the third quarter of the financial year, all states should have a stock of food grains equivalent to at least 85 per cent of the total annual food grain allocation. In FY 2011-12, none of the states met this norm. One possible reason for this low availability may be that states did not procure the required quantum of food grains from the Food Corporation of India (FCI). In FY 2011-12, Tamil Nadu had lifted only 67 per cent of its food grain allocation, while Uttar Pradesh had lifted 82 per cent. Punjab, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, and Madhya Pradesh lifted over 90 per cent of total food grain allocation.17 PROTECTION Protection continues to receive the smallest share of the budget. However, at 0.04 per cent, unlike other sectors there has been no fall in its share of allocation in 2015-16. Resonating its concern over India’s performance on child protection, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC Committee) reviewing India’s report observed, “The budgetary allocations do not adequately take into consideration child protection needs. There is also mis-management of allocated resources, a problem which is exacerbated by a high level of corruption and the lack of effective monitoring and evaluation systems”. Integrated Child Protection Scheme ICPS received a minimal increase of 0.56 per cent over the last year’s budget (From 400 crore in 2014- 2015 to 402.23 crore in 2015-2016). Slow and tardy implementation of ICPS can be attributed to the unfortunate service conditions of the functionaries for the job, who are appointed on contractual basis, whose salaries get delayed by months, thereby leading to high levels of attrition and impacting effective implementation of the scheme. 17 Accountability Initiative, Budget briefs – Mid day meal 2013-2014
  • 12. 11 In February 2014, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs approved the continuation of ICPS in the XII Plan with enhanced financial norms - the budget was INR 3000.3 crore (for five years), which included Central share of INR 2350 crore and State share of INR 650.33 crore. According to this there is a shortfall of INR 248.10 crores. A revision of the ICPS norms 18 implies that this shortfall is much larger. Status of Integrated Child Protection Scheme Year No. of states that have signed MOU’s Budget Allocation (In Crore) Amount sanctioned (in Crore) No. of beneficiaries 2009-2010 17 BE-60.00 RE-50.00 42.63 36,780 2010-2011 34 BE-300.00 RE-100.00 115.13 92,379 2011-2012 34 BE-270.00 RE-180.00 177.54 50,118 2012-2013 34 BE-400.00 RE-273.20 259.09 75,052 2013-2014 35 BE-300.00 RE-270.00 265.38 74,983 2014-2015 35 BE-400.00 NA NA Source: Annual Report 2013-2014, Ministry of Women and Child Development, GOI In its report, the Department-Related Parliamentary On Human Resource Development for the Juvenile Justice (Care And Protection of Children) Bill, 2014, February 2015, has provided the following status of Child Welfare Committees (CWC) and Juvenile Justice Board (JJB) in the districts.19 It observed: “Committee notes that out of 660 districts in the country, 626 have Child Welfare Committees and 612 Juvenile Justice Boards in existence. However, if the pendency of cases both in the Child Welfare Committees and the Juvenile Justice Boards is looked into a disturbing scenario emerged. Delhi had maximum number of cases pending in the Child Welfare Committees followed by Rajasthan, Nagaland, Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Chandigarh. All these States had district wise CWCs and JJBs, except Delhi which had 7 and 2 CWCs and JJBs respectively for 9 districts. Similarly, Gujarat had highest number of cases pending in the Juvenile Justice Boards followed by Rajasthan, Chhattisgarh, Tamil Nadu and Odisha. Again with the exception of Chhattisgarh all the States had district wise CWCs and JJBs. From the above details, the Committee can only conclude that CWCs and JJBs were not fully functional. Reasons for this could be lack of funds, inadequate facilities and absence of trained manpower. In addition, procedural delays could also not be ignored”. 18 Norms have been enhanced for, construction (` 1000/sq.ft. from ` 600/sq.ft. earlier); maintenance grant in homes, open shelters, specialized adoption agencies from existing ` 750 per child per month to ` 2000 per child per month; salaries as well as other recurring administrative costs18. 19 http://164.100.47.5/newcommittee/reports/EnglishCommittees/Committee%20on%20HRD/264.pdf
  • 13. 12 S.No Name of State/UT No. of Districts CWCs JJBs 1 Andaman & Nicobar island 3 1 1 2 Andhra Pradesh (including Telangana) 23 23 23 3 Arunachal Pradesh 17 16 16 4 Assam 27 27 27 5 Bihar 38 38 38 6 Chandigarh 1 1 1 7 Chhattisgarh 27 27 17 8 Dadra & Nagar Haveli 1 1 1 9 Daman & Diu 2 2 2 10 Delhi 9 7 2 11 Goa 2 2 2 12 Gujarat 26 26 26 13 Haryana 21 21 21 14 Himachal Pradesh 12 12 12 15 Jammu & Kashmir 22 16 Jharkhand 24 24 21 17 Karnataka 30 31 30 18 Kerala 14 14 14 19 Lakshadweep 1 1 1 20 Madhya Pradesh 50 50 50 21 Maharashtra 35 35 35 22 Manipur 9 9 9 23 Meghalaya 7 7 7 24 Mizoram 8 8 8 25 Nagaland 11 11 11 26 Orissa 30 30 30 27 Puducherry 4 3 4 28 Punjab 22 22 22 29 Rajasthan 33 33 33 30 Sikkim 4 4 4 31 Tamil Nadu 32 32 32 32 Tripura 8 4 8 33 Uttarakhand 13 13 13 34 Uttar Pradesh 75 72 72 35 West Bengal 19 19 19 Total 660 626 612
  • 14. 13 The Standing Committee Report also provided details of pendency of cases in these statutory bodies. (a): State-wise Pendency of Cases in Child Welfare Committees Sr. No State 01.04.2011 01.04.2012 01.04.2013 30.09.2014 1 Andhra Pradesh (including Telangana) 163 155 293 123 2 Assam 156 189 409 330 3 Chandigarh 0 4 Chhattisgarh 161 663 5 Daman and Diu 0 0 6 Delhi 2432 1533 1759 7 Gujarat 861 833 115 8 Haryana 118 118 226 9 Himchal Pradesh 25 10 Kerala 992 11 Karnataka 773 12 Madhya Pradesh 321 13 Meghalaya 34 39 14 Mizoram 4 4 30 48 15 Nagaland 25 16 Odisha 255 1194 17 Puducherry 3 3 4 3 18 Punjab 1 19 Rajasthan 1987 893 484 1657 20 Sikkim 1 1 1 6 21 Tamil Nadu 935 1317 838 818 22 Tripura 105 211 (b): State-wise Pendency of Cases in Juvenile Justice Board Sr. No State 01.04.2011 01.04.2012 01.04.2013 30.09.2014 1 Andhra Pradesh (including Telangana) 315 341 516 55 2 Assam 1592 1703 1812 1852 3 Chandigarh 12 4 Chhattisgarh 6394 6840 5 Daman and Diu 0 9 6 Delhi 338 370 9 7 Gujarat 10778 11707 12831 8 Haryana 1714 1925 2035 9 Himachal Pradesh 507 10 Kerala 1047 11 Karnataka 1547 12 Madhya Pradesh 13783 13 Meghalaya 22 143 14 Mizoram 80 135 92 42 15 Nagaland 46 16 Odisha 591 4735 17 Puducherry 35 57 63 61 18 Punjab 1299 19 Rajasthan 6813 6776 5174 8647 20 Sikkim 35 41 28 14 21 Tamil Nadu 2811 3300 3586 5066 22 Tripura 18 54
  • 15. 14 SAFE INDIA SKILL INDIA GREEN INDIA MAKE IN INDIA BUT WHERE IS CHILDREN’S INDIA MR. FM? HAQ: Centre for Child Rights, based in Delhi, India, began working in October 1998 (formally registered under the Societies Registration Act, in June 1999). HAQ: focuses on children in a holistic way – as Actors in our society, as Citizens of Today and as Adults of the Future and seeks to recognize, protect and promote all rights for all children in an integrated manner, making crosscutting linkages between all categories of children, especially children who are disadvantaged on account of their gender, caste, class, ethnicity, ability and location, and issues affecting them. Working on children and governance, and child protection, it is actively engaged in monitoring government’s performance, public education and advocacy on children’s rights. It works as a resource and support base providing information, referral service, legal aid, training and capacity building of all those working with children or on issues concerning them, and the children themselves.

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