The tourism industry is huge and can be
broken up to into a number of sectors.
Transportation is essential to tourist, whether
they are going to and from airports or taking
scenic tours. Types of trans...
This is made up of organisations which provide
accommodation and sometimes food,
beverage, and entertainment to visitors w...
There are many other subsectors of the tourism industry
which provide important support services to visiting tourist
inclu...
 These businesses organise and/or conduct tours
and events which are generally components of
packaged holidays. For insta...
It is important to note that, although not
classed as a sector of the tourism industry, the
government must be included as...
Attractions are often the lure for tourist to travel to a
destination. Accommodation, transport and restaurants are
consid...
MICE stands for meetings, incentives, conferences and
exhibition tourism. It involves the planning organising
and hosting ...
Travel agents and agencies are considered the
public face of the industry and acts as a travel
retail shop for consumers. ...
Hayley Blunden
of 10

Structure of the tourism and travel industry- Hayley Blunden

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Travel      Business      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Structure of the tourism and travel industry- Hayley Blunden

  • 1. The tourism industry is huge and can be broken up to into a number of sectors.
  • 2. Transportation is essential to tourist, whether they are going to and from airports or taking scenic tours. Types of transport include;  Airlines  Coach operators  Cruise liners  Railways  Taxis  Car rental companies
  • 3. This is made up of organisations which provide accommodation and sometimes food, beverage, and entertainment to visitors who are travelling away from home. Types of accommodation include;  Hotels/motels  Bed and breakfast  Resorts  Apartments  Caravan/camping grounds  farm stays
  • 4. There are many other subsectors of the tourism industry which provide important support services to visiting tourist including;  Tour guides  Tourist information centres  Travel insurance companies  Retail outlets (duty free and souvenir shops)  Food, beverage and entertainment outlets  Travel guide publications  Industry associations  Tourism authorities  Councils  Research bodies  Task forces
  • 5.  These businesses organise and/or conduct tours and events which are generally components of packaged holidays. For instance, a wholesaler such as Sunlover holidays buys travel products in bulk (flights, accommodation, tour, attractions, tickets etc.) and packages those into travel deals which are then marked to travel agents and/or the general public. Wholesalers can be further segmented into inbound or outbound providers, packaging travel either in Australia or for overseas destinations. Tour operators usually operate locally and provide visitors with tours to specific attractions or regions, such as a day trip to the local wine region.
  • 6. It is important to note that, although not classed as a sector of the tourism industry, the government must be included as a major influence on tourism, especially due to its huge role in tourism planning, research, promotion, advising and regulation.
  • 7. Attractions are often the lure for tourist to travel to a destination. Accommodation, transport and restaurants are considered ancillary services and in most cases are not the primary motivations for travel. Attractions can be either packaged into a tour or sold as a standalone product. They are quiet varied; some are free while others are not, some are government owned while some are commercial etc. Attractions can be segmented into:  Natural e.g. parks and zoos  Historical e.g. museums and monuments  Cultural e.g. galleries, theatres, indigenous centres  Manmade e.g. big pineapple, the Sydney Opera House  Entertainment e.g. amusement parks, cinemas, sporting arenas  Festivals e.g. Mardi Gras, royal shows, Melbourne cup
  • 8. MICE stands for meetings, incentives, conferences and exhibition tourism. It involves the planning organising and hosting of short term or one-off events. Most major cities have convention centres designed to attract these events. This competitive sector contributes significantly to the industry due to size, cost and ancillary services involved in staging events.  Meetings – off site gatherings (conventions and seminars)  Incentives - corporate travel/trips to reward high performing employees  Conferences – large scale training, workshops and information sessions  Exhibitions – events which showcase industry products and services (tradeshow)
  • 9. Travel agents and agencies are considered the public face of the industry and acts as a travel retail shop for consumers. They are essentially the intermediary that sells tourism services provided by other businesses. Travel agencies can target the general public, corporate markets and/or niche markets. They provide a range of services, such as travel advice, ticket sales, visa information and insurance needs.
  • 10. Hayley Blunden

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