For Immediate Release
The eBike Store Electrifies Local Cycling
Speedy, sustainable and popular overseas, a new breed of b...
Some bicycle retailers have created space on their sales floor for e-bikes, but not until
now has a local store specifical...
There are other advantages. An e-bike makes economic sense during a time of lower
incomes and unpredictable oil prices. In...
About the eBike Store
Founded on the belief that the world is looking for economical, environmentally friendly
transportat...
of 4

press release for weeklies

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - press release for weeklies

  • 1. For Immediate Release The eBike Store Electrifies Local Cycling Speedy, sustainable and popular overseas, a new breed of bike is quietly rolling onto Portland streets, and a local shop now specializes in it. PORTLAND, Ore. — As Portland’s bicycling infrastructure widens, so too does the array of options for people who choose to pedal. With The eBike Store, local entrepreneur Wakefield Gregg has brought the bike-impassioned city a new category of two-wheeler to grapple with: the electric bicycle. June 27 will mark the grand opening of The eBike Store, at 201 N. Alberta Ave., which stocks e-bikes and accessories exclusively. Ever since the store opened last month, customers are moving the cycles from the sales floor to the city’s streets. E-bikes are already wildly popular in Europe and China. Despite Portland’s passion for bikes, or perhaps precisely because of it, the addition of e-bikes to the city’s cycling infrastructure has generated friction between cycling purists and, perhaps, realists. Some enthusiasts don’t consider them to be “true” bikes, and criticize the introduction of a motorized, faster two-wheel vehicle into bike lanes, streets and bridges. At the same time, others in the cycling community welcome the latest variation on the “one less car” ideal, and even Bicycling magazine recently asked, “Is it finally time to stop hating on e-bikes?” “They’re not for everybody,” said Gregg, who owns an electric bike himself. “But I am overwhelmed by the positive response from the bike community. Even hardcore cyclists understand that e-bikes may be the only way to get some folks out of their cars.” Page 1 of 4
  • 2. Some bicycle retailers have created space on their sales floor for e-bikes, but not until now has a local store specifically dedicated to them emerged. Gregg expects to see Portland sustain the emerging category, and with The eBike Store, he’s doing all he can to demystify the new rides. Occupying part of the Humboldt Gardens mixed-use complex, The eBike Store is housed in a structure that has received a Gold certification in the LEED green building rating system. Inside the 750-square-foot store is a customer lounge area and an espresso machine. Reclaimed materials include bike braking cables that suspend the track lighting; slat wall panels from a defunct big-box store; and a 125-year-old slab of Douglas fir salvaged from a Seaside barn. A new product such as an e-bike tends to do best in a specialty shop, rather than sharing space with bikes at a conventional shop, where staff may not be trained in or respectful of the differences in the product. Gregg envisions the store he founded as a place where people can check out the electric bicycle for themselves and decide whether it might work for them. Mountain bikes too established their identity through boutique-style shops and gradually accelerated in popularity from there. “I want to build a space in the customer’s mind where they can evaluate whether an electric bike will fit their lifestyle,” Gregg said. At first glance, an e-bike looks like any other human-powered cycle. It has working pedals and a conventional multi-speed drivetrain. The key difference is in a rechargeable battery, which provides extra wattage that can be especially useful when confronted with the metro area’s terrain: Being able to ride comfortably up hills is often cited as a reason for wanting an electric bike. Having that boost during a strenuous stretch could constitute the tipping point for people who are on the fence about getting out of their car. Page 2 of 4
  • 3. There are other advantages. An e-bike makes economic sense during a time of lower incomes and unpredictable oil prices. Industry analysts, store owners and bicycle manufacturers agree with the obvious: During tight economic times, bicycle use soars. It makes environmental sense, too: Buy green electricity from the power company, and you’ve got a highly sustainable personal mobility solution. Through human and electric power, an e-bike can transport its rider between 10 and 80 miles per charge at a speed of about 20 miles per hour. The cost to charge an e-bike’s battery usually is less than 5 cents. The eBike Store stocks electric bikes from eZee, Currie Technologies and Schwinn, and Gregg anticipates that e-bikes from Giant and Torker will arrive in June. Models he has sold range from a $600 Currie Trailz seven-speed mountain bike, which travels 8 to 13 miles per 5.5- hour charge, to the $3,000 Schwinn Tailwind, which charges in less than 30 minutes with a removable charger. Electric Bikes and the Law Oregon law defines an electric bike as a bicycle rather than a motor vehicle. In addition, the main laws that apply to electric bikes in Oregon is that they are legal in bike lanes but illegal on sidewalks, their motor be incapable of propelling the bike faster than 20 mph, and that riders be at least 16 years old. Grand Opening The grand opening is Saturday, June 27, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at The eBike Store, 201 N. Alberta Ave. at N. Vancouver Ave. Page 3 of 4
  • 4. About the eBike Store Founded on the belief that the world is looking for economical, environmentally friendly transportation, The eBike Store seeks to harness the explosive worldwide growth in the electric bicycle market as it unfolds in the United States. More information is available at www.ebikesnw.com. For more information: Hon Walker, Bulletproof Communication, 503-358-0247, hwalker@bulletproofcommunication.com Wakefield Gregg, The eBike Store, 503-360-1432, wake@ebikestore.com Page 4 of 4

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