Dominick Fazarro, Ph.D. , CSTM
University of Texas at Tyler
Webinar ▪ August 20, 2014
The future of nanotechnology
The potential hazards of nanoparticles
Behaving Safely
Laboratory practices for worker...
By 2020, there will be 6
million workers in
nanoscience and
manufacturing worldwide
and 2 million of those jobs
expe...
Spheres
Other Geometric
Shapes
Rods Tubes
There are some unknowns
about nanoparticles in terms
of their characterization
There is no or little research
to det...
 Researchers found that carbon nano
tubes (multi‐walled) In addition to the
early‐stage non‐cancer lung effects in
ani...
 Inhaled nanoparticles can deposit
in the lungs and then potentially
move to other organs such as the
brain, the liver...
 Performing a hazardous task
safely is not enough, a person
must behave safely
 Managers must a safety‐minded
attitu...
ANTECEDENTS
(before behavior)
THE ABC MODEL
BEHAVIOR
(observable actions)
CONSEQUENCES
(during or after behavior)
P...
What are the exposure routes?
MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet)
PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)
Safety Engineer...
ROUTES
Related human
activities that lead to exposure
Ingestion
Contact with skin
Inhalation
Hand to Mouth
Skin Pun...
A person who work with
engineered nanoparticles
should be reading the
MSDS
A person should be
familiar with known
...
PPE (Personal Protective Equipment)
The last line of defense for acting safely. PPE is a barrier to protect the body
And...
Glove Box
Fume Hood
Clean Room
Glove Bag
HVAC
Develop a Preventative
Maintenance plan (PM)
 This plan will help:
 Maintain maximum protection
Meet or exceed the...
Spills must be cleaned up
immediately with the use of HEPA‐FILTER
VACUUM equipment or wet
wipe (towels) or the combina...
If Storage in waste containers must
be built to handle nanomaterials.
The containers must be in good
condition and pre...
Technical Data
“N type” respirators, has a median size
of the test particle, by count, is 75 nm
According to a 2007 ar...
NIOSH‐CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2014‐102/pdfs/2014‐102.pdf
OSHA
https://www.osha.gov/dsg/nanotechnology/nanot...
For any questions, please
contact me @
University of Texas at Tyler
Office (903) 565-5911
Cell: (936) 689-7695
Email:...
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know
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Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know

As with all materials, if you work with nanoparticles a few minutes of thought about safety will help you avoid problems later. Dr. Dominick Fazarro of the University of Texas at Tyler discusses nanoparticle safety. This talk provides a reasonable discussion of the potential hazards of nanoparticles and steps that can be taken to reduce these hazards. This talk is useful for those who work with nanoparticles or manage a facility that handles nanoparticles.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nano Safety: What Workers Need to Know

  • 1. Dominick Fazarro, Ph.D. , CSTM University of Texas at Tyler Webinar ▪ August 20, 2014
  • 2. The future of nanotechnology The potential hazards of nanoparticles Behaving Safely Laboratory practices for workers Resources for better understanding the safety of nanoparticles
  • 3. By 2020, there will be 6 million workers in nanoscience and manufacturing worldwide and 2 million of those jobs expected to be in the U.S.1 Nanotechnology will bring new innovations which will change society. We as people still have problems handling technology in moral and ethical manner to benefit human kind. 1 Roco, M. C. (2011). Journal of nanoparticle research, 13, 427‐445.
  • 4. Spheres Other Geometric Shapes Rods Tubes
  • 5. There are some unknowns about nanoparticles in terms of their characterization There is no or little research to determine if different size nanoparticles have the same properties This may proposed a problem if scientists do not know if different size nanoparticles have different reactions to the human body
  • 6.  Researchers found that carbon nano tubes (multi‐walled) In addition to the early‐stage non‐cancer lung effects in animals, some studies in cells or animals have shown genotoxic or carcinogenic effects2  Single‐walled carbon nanotubes, for example, can be manufactured via several different processes which can generate products with different physical and chemical properties  It is unclear whether existing test methods for physical and chemical properties are sufficient for nanomaterials characterization in order to assess their risk and to determine their exposure and hazard. It is clear, however, that properties such as boiling point are insufficient  Studies have found that carbon nanotubes is just as dangerous as Asbestos 2 NIOSH (2013).Occupational exposure to carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. http://www.particleandfibretoxicology.com/content/7/1/28
  • 7.  Inhaled nanoparticles can deposit in the lungs and then potentially move to other organs such as the brain, the liver, and the spleen, and possibly the fetus in pregnant women. Some materials could become toxic if they are inhaled in the form of nanoparticles. Inhaled nanoparticles may cause lung inflammation and heart problems4 4 EUROPA (2013). Public health: Nanotechnologies. http://ec.europa.eu/health/scientific_committees/ opinions_layman/en/nanotechnologies/l‐2/6‐health‐effects‐nanoparticles.htm
  • 8.  Performing a hazardous task safely is not enough, a person must behave safely  Managers must a safety‐minded attitude to provide a safe‐environment  Safety is even more focused and important when dealing with particles on the nano‐relm  Safety engineering is to assist workers to perform their jobs safely in manufacturing nanoparticles 5 Agnew, J. & Synder, G. (2008). Removing obstacles to safety: A behavior‐based approach. Performance Production Publications: Atlanta, GA
  • 9. ANTECEDENTS (before behavior) THE ABC MODEL BEHAVIOR (observable actions) CONSEQUENCES (during or after behavior) PROMPT PEOPLE TO ACT OR BEHAVE WHAT WE DO OBSERVABLE ACTIONS FOLLOW BEHAVIOR AMD MAKE IT MORE OR LESS LIKELY TO HAPPEN AGAIN NEGATIVE & POSITIVE CONSEQUENCES
  • 10. What are the exposure routes? MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) Safety Engineering Equipment Disposal of nanoparticles/materials
  • 11. ROUTES Related human activities that lead to exposure Ingestion Contact with skin Inhalation Hand to Mouth Skin Puncture
  • 12. A person who work with engineered nanoparticles should be reading the MSDS A person should be familiar with known chemical hazards IF THERE IS NO MSDS ON THE PACKAGE DO NOT OPEN, RETURN TO MANUFACTUER!!!!
  • 13. PPE (Personal Protective Equipment) The last line of defense for acting safely. PPE is a barrier to protect the body And prevent leakage of particles Dermal exposure Inhalation exposure
  • 14. Glove Box Fume Hood Clean Room Glove Bag HVAC
  • 15. Develop a Preventative Maintenance plan (PM)  This plan will help:  Maintain maximum protection Meet or exceed the life of the warranty  Reduce human error
  • 16. Spills must be cleaned up immediately with the use of HEPA‐FILTER VACUUM equipment or wet wipe (towels) or the combination of two Gloves must be used If spills that may cause airborne nanoparticles, must use proper respiratory protection 6 http://nano.berkley.edu/research/73nanotech.pdf
  • 17. If Storage in waste containers must be built to handle nanomaterials. The containers must be in good condition and prevent leaks Storage of nanomaterial in plastic bags labeled and color coded to ensure proper disposal Must have a Waste Disposal Operations Procedures (WDOP) for workers 6 http://nano.berkley.edu/research/73nanotech.pdf
  • 18. Technical Data “N type” respirators, has a median size of the test particle, by count, is 75 nm According to a 2007 article in the Nanotechnology Law Report7, standard air filter Techniques were used on silver nano particles (3nm‐20nm). Study revealed that particle penetration decreases continuously down to 3nm. Although other engineered nanoparticles may behave differently in filter media. Some standard air filter techniques may not apply as more engineered nanoparticles are developed 7 http://www.nanolawreport.com/2007/06/articles/will‐standard‐air‐filtration‐techniques‐work‐with‐nanoparticles/# axzz3AlTs6pjw
  • 19. NIOSH‐CDC http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2014‐102/pdfs/2014‐102.pdf OSHA https://www.osha.gov/dsg/nanotechnology/nanotechnology. html EH&S‐Berkley Campushttp://nano.berkeley.edu/research/73nanotech.pdf U.S. Department of Health and Human Serviceshttp://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/results/nano/index.html United Kingdom http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/safety/subjects/nanotechnology Penn State http://www.ehs.psu.edu/occhealth/nanomaterials.cfm
  • 20. For any questions, please contact me @ University of Texas at Tyler Office (903) 565-5911 Cell: (936) 689-7695 Email: dfazarro@uttyler.edu

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