Unnatural World:
Our national parks and climate change
Periyar
Type: Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests
Vulnerabilities
● Increase in frequency and intensity of fo...
Tadoba
Type: Tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests
Vulnerabilities
● Increase in
frequency and intensity of fores...
Khangchendzonga
Type: Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests
Vulnerabilities
Increasing temperatures
↓
Northward movement o...
Gangotri
Type: Temperate coniferous forests
Vulnerabilities
Increasing temperatures →
Northward movement of forests
=
fore...
Sariska
Type: Grasslands, savannas and shrublands
Vulnerabilities
Increase in CO2 levels
↓
increase in woody species
↓
Shi...
Kaziranga
Type: Flooded grasslands and savannas
Vulnerabilities
Water scarcity
↓
drying up of wetlands, heat stress, fires...
Thar
Type: Deserts and xeric shrublands
Vulnerabilities
Higher temperature + Episodic rainfall
↓
increased runoff, less st...
Sunderbans
Type: Mangroves
Vulnerabilities
Rising sea levels
↓
Flood out mangroves
Characteristic
species:
Mangrove spp,
p...
Hemis
Type: Montane grassland and shrubland
Vulnerabilities
Rising temperatures
↓
Temperate forests move to higher
latitud...
Rani Jhansi Marine National Park
Type: Coral reefs
Vulnerabilities
Increasing temperature & CO2
↓
increase in photosynthes...
Created by
Chicu Lokgariwar
for
India Water Portal
of 12

Unnatural World: National Parks and Climate Change

Do our national parks stand a chance of surviving climate change? We try to find out. http://www.indiawaterportal.org/articles/unnatural-world-national-parks-and-climate-change
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Environment      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Unnatural World: National Parks and Climate Change

  • 1. Unnatural World: Our national parks and climate change
  • 2. Periyar Type: Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests Vulnerabilities ● Increase in frequency and intensity of forest fires + Changes in rainfall = Shift towards dry deciduous forest type and eventual desertification ● Atmospheric warming → Cloud forest confined in narrow belt = Loss of upto one-third of endemics, Possible eventual extinction Characteristic species: Teak, rosewoods,banyans Elephants, tigers, sambhar, flying squirrel, sloth bear etc
  • 3. Tadoba Type: Tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests Vulnerabilities ● Increase in frequency and intensity of forest fires + Changes in rainfall = loss of biodiversity and eventual desertification Characteristic species: Teak, palas, jamun, ain, semal Tigers, leopards,dhole, gaur nilgai, chital, etc
  • 4. Khangchendzonga Type: Temperate broadleaf and mixed forests Vulnerabilities Increasing temperatures ↓ Northward movement of forests = forests invade high-altitude meadows, and eventually decline when not able to 'keep up' with rising temperatures Characteristic species: oak, birch, maple, willow snow leopard, musk deer, himalayan tahr , trogopan, griffon Increase in invasives + changes in flowering times = Decline and loss of some species.
  • 5. Gangotri Type: Temperate coniferous forests Vulnerabilities Increasing temperatures → Northward movement of forests = forests invade high-altitude meadows, and eventually decline when not able to 'keep up' with rising temperatures Characteristic species: deodar, fir, spruce, snow leopard, musk deer, himalayan tahr , brown bear Increase in invasives + changes in flowering times = Decline and loss of some species.
  • 6. Sariska Type: Grasslands, savannas and shrublands Vulnerabilities Increase in CO2 levels ↓ increase in woody species ↓ Shift towards forest type and decline of grazers ↓ Decline of predators Characteristic species: grasses, ber, khair, arjun tiger, hyena, jackal, antelope chital, boar, sandgrouse,
  • 7. Kaziranga Type: Flooded grasslands and savannas Vulnerabilities Water scarcity ↓ drying up of wetlands, heat stress, fires ↓ species loss Characteristic species: sugarcanes, spear grass, elephant grass, kumbhi, Indian gooseberry, rhinoceros, water buffalo, swamp deer, fishing cat, leopard cat Hotter and dryer environment ↓ increase in vectors, pests, invasives ↓ species loss
  • 8. Thar Type: Deserts and xeric shrublands Vulnerabilities Higher temperature + Episodic rainfall ↓ increased runoff, less storage ↓ animal mortality due to heat and water stress Characteristic species: sewan grass, aak shru , dhok blackbuck, desert fox, wolf and desert cat, bustards, grouse, vipers, lizard Warmer, earlier spring ↓ increased water consumption and locust plagues
  • 9. Sunderbans Type: Mangroves Vulnerabilities Rising sea levels ↓ Flood out mangroves Characteristic species: Mangrove spp, palms,spear grass tigers, dolphins, fishing cat, crustaceans, boar, deer Increased extreme events ↓ Damage to forests Increased CO2 levels → Damage to coral reefs → Loss of protection from waves → damage to forests
  • 10. Hemis Type: Montane grassland and shrubland Vulnerabilities Rising temperatures ↓ Temperate forests move to higher latitudes ↓ Grasslands 'squeezed' into narrowing belts ↓ Loss of an estimated half of present area under montane grasslands Characteristic species: Juniper, Anemone,Gentiana, Thallctrwn, Lloydia, Veronica, Delphinum Snow leopards,tibetan wolf, ibex,griffon, marmot
  • 11. Rani Jhansi Marine National Park Type: Coral reefs Vulnerabilities Increasing temperature & CO2 ↓ increase in photosynthesis + nitric oxide ↓ Death of corals Characteristic species: Corals, sponges, jellyfish, fish, crustaceans... Most productive biome Rising sea levels ↓ Coral reefs drown
  • 12. Created by Chicu Lokgariwar for India Water Portal

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