SUPPORTED BY:
www.informa.com.au/disability2016
PRESENTATIONS FROM:
Professor Susan Baladin, Chair In Disability
and Inclu...
8.30 Registration and Morning Coffee
9.00 Opening remarks from the Chair
9.10 More than Care: Making the Relationship W...
8.30 Registration and Morning Coffee
9.00 Opening remarks from the Chair
9.10 Communication: The Key to Effective Plann...
Use your QR Reader App on your
smartphone and scan this code to
take you directly to the website
For full terms and condit...
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National Disability Summit Brochure

Disability reform remains a very high profile topic nationally and more specifically, for the individuals and support networks impacted by the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The main goal of the NDIS is to support people with disabilities and their families maximise independence and social and economic participation. The NDIS is doubling the national investment in disability support and since its rollout in July 2014 with launch sites in ACT, SA, Tasmania, Hunter region (NSW) and Barwon region (VIC), has moved into its next phase with expansion to additional sites. A core principal of the NDIS is giving people with a disability greater choice and control in way they receive services and support and the 2016 National Disability Summit will review the progress and initiatives in creating greater choice, support and participation.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National Disability Summit Brochure

  • 1. SUPPORTED BY: www.informa.com.au/disability2016 PRESENTATIONS FROM: Professor Susan Baladin, Chair In Disability and Inclusion, Deakin University Kathryn Schenk, Analyst - Disability and Mental Health Section, Population, Labour and Social Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics David Green, Director, Department of Family and Community Services Jodie Goldney, Growth Initiatives Manager, Aftercare Renée Heaton, Consumer Dr Di Winkler, CEO, Summer Foundation David Meldrum, Executive Director, Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia Sharidan Shimmin, Rehabilitation Coordinator, Brightwater Care Group Libby Callaway, Researcher Occupational Therapy Department, Monash University TOPICS INCLUDE: – NDIS ROLLOUT: Update – Consumer Carer Perspectives on Disability Service Delivery Support – How Organisations are Responding to the NDIS – Overcoming Barriers to Meaningful Participation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with Disabilities – Integrating Mental Health into Disability Reform – Promoting Inclusion of People with Intellectual Disability within Health Professional Research and Teaching – The Unmet Need for Formal Assistance in Australia – Communication: The Key to Effective Planning National Disability Summit Transforming Disability Service Delivery to Optimise the Choice, Control and Participation of People with Disabilities 15 – 16 March 2016 | SMC Conference and Function Centre Sydney PRESENTING THE 7TH ANNUAL DISABILITY HEALTH MENTALPHYSICAL BUSINESSSTRATEGY CONTROL OPTIMISATION SUPPORT NDIS HOUSING CARER ACCESSIBILITY REFORM CHOICE COMMUNITY CONSUMER SECTOR DEVELOPMENT COLLABORATION EDUCATION PARTICIPATION RIGHTS DELIVERY PROVIDERS SERVICES SERVICES CARE
  • 2. 8.30 Registration and Morning Coffee 9.00 Opening remarks from the Chair 9.10 More than Care: Making the Relationship Work Anyone who requires care will know how difficult and exhausting it can be sourcing, training and making the relationship work between the support worker and client. Historically those requiring care have just had to take what (and who) they can get and haven’t felt empowered when it comes to making preferences known or negotiating outcomes. Similarly, support-workers are there to do a job, and with a full schedule it’s easier just to do the same thing everywhere they go. It is an area of care giving that we don’t speak a lot about and while support workers receive some training, it is mostly practical and doesn’t consider the relationship. For the client there is no training. Now more than ever it is important for the client-support worker relationship to work and for the match between the client and support worker to be more like a partnership. We’d like to share with you our experience of a good relationship and offer advice and practical tips to developing and building that relationship. Renée Heaton, Consumer Cathy Clifford, SupportWorker 9.50 Am I disabled enough?- The Problem with Eligibility Testing As a child with cerebral palsy, I could access a range of ‘disability support services,’ which made life with CP just a little bit easier. Then, at age 12, I stopped using my wheelchair and was left pretty much on my own. Now as I move into my thirties my body is degenerating and I find myself waiting to be disabled enough to again qualify for disability support - support that I need now. Rex Betar, Consumer 10.20 Update on the NDIS 11.00 Morning Tea 11.30 Working Collaboratively: One Organisation’s Response to NDIS —— How do we respond to unprecedented changes making the philosophical and service-delivery shift from block to individualised funding —— How do we work in collaboration as opposed to isolation in response to NDIS —— Proposal: A new and revolutionary learning model for the mental health and disability sector which will coordinate and provide access to a national and international resource set, necessary for the process of certification within the mental health, and disability support worker families Jodie Goldney, GrowthInitiativesManager, Aftercare Caroline Van Til, StrategicProjectDevelopmentManager, Aftercare 12.10 The Unmet Need for Formal Assistance in Australia Measuring the formal assistance needs of people with disability, and whether those needs were met, is a critical component of the 2012 ABS Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers. A recent report by the ABS examining the unmet formal assistance needs of people with disability found that approximately half of those who needed formal assistance did not have their assistance needs met. The report found that certain population groups were more likely to experience an unmet need for assistance, including young males, and those with intellectual and psychological disabilities. Reasons for not receiving adequate formal assistance and the different types of assistance needs that were unmet will also be discussed. Kathryn Schenk, Analyst-Analyst-DisabilityandMentalHealthSection, Australian Bureau of Statistics 12.50 Lunch 13.50 What does the future hold for people with Complex Needs? People with complex needs are more difficult to plan with and require ongoing flexibility and responsiveness in designing solutions that encourage better outcomes for individuals that ‘don’t fit’ standard services responses. How are the needs of this cohort of people to be addressed within the disability paradigm and how will people who are not eligible under the NDIS remain supported within the community?  What does the future hold for this cohort of people? Cherylee Treloar, CEO, Footprints in Brisbane 14.30 Concepts of Disability Care—What Do They Mean in the Context of Enduring Mental Illness? —— What is disability in the context of mental illness? How does this align with the objectives of the NDIS? —— What helps to reduce that disability? —— What does/should this specific disability workforce look like? —— Where does all this fit alongside concepts like recovery, peer work, holistic care and complex care coordination? David Meldrum, ExecutiveDirector, Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia 15.10 Afternoon Tea 15.40 Factors Influencing Indigenous Australian’s Engagement with Disability Services John Gilroy, Lecturer, University of Sydney 16.20 Skills for Living: Transitioning of a Social Skills Program into the new NDIS A social skills program funded by Home and Community Care (HACC) has been building capacity by enhancing skills in participant’s living with an Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) within Western Australia for the last five years. The programs focus is on the individual through the use of the goal tree that the participant’s complete with a focus on economic, social and independence goals. This program aligns with the NDIS outcome framework in relation to capacity building. The HACC Social Skills Program has allowed Brightwater an advanced approach to working toward client centered goals in a functional way using an already time limited approach, a model desirable under the NDIS. Sharidan Shimmin, RehabilitationCoordinator, Brightwater Care Group 17.00 Closing Remarks from Chair Networking Drinks www.informa.com.au/disability2016 Venue Details SMC Conference and Function Centre Sydney, 66 Goulburn St, Sydney NSW 2000 Phone: (02) 9284 2888 , www.smcfc.com.au National Disability Summit Tuesday 15 March 2016 DAY 1
  • 3. 8.30 Registration and Morning Coffee 9.00 Opening remarks from the Chair 9.10 Communication: The Key to Effective Planning Effective planning relies on good communication. For people with little or no functional speech, those who have complex communication needs, planning is often problematic. The complexity of planning increases with the severity of the communication impairment and any additional impairment. In this presentation planning with those who have complex communication needs will be discussed in light of current research and evidence based practice. Professor Susan Baladin, ChairInDisabilityandInclusion, Deakin University 9.50 Promoting Inclusion of People with Intellectual Disability within Health Professional Research and Teaching People with intellectual disabilities face many barriers to access, inclusion, participation and contribution - including appropriate health care as well as open employment. With the advent of the NDIS, the profile of people with disabilities has been raised, but potential not yet realised. Over many years, our Centre has included people with intellectual disabilities employed as tutors for medical and other health care students at undergraduate level. More recently, our teaching and training has expanded to online learning and teaching; an important part of the success of this has been the inclusion of actors with disabilities in these learning and teaching packages. This presentation will explore the need for advocacy and provide attendees with the skills to enable people with intellectual disabilities to contribute to education and research. Associate Professor Rachael McDonald, ResearchDirector, Associate Professor,OccupationalTherapy, Monash University Dr Jane Tracy, DirectoroftheCentreforDevelopmentalDisabilityHealth, Victoria, Monash Health Community 10.30 Morning Tea 11.00 Building an Evidence Base for Transforming Disability Services Delivery and the Engagement between University and Services in Supporting Research for Transformation Universities are similarly at the forefront of researching and piloting strategies for building knowledge and practice around the NDIS. Working in partnership with organisations to transition to NDIS is kay to developing authentic real world policy and practice. In Queensland, attention has been paid to people with disabilities developing capacity for selecting and choosing their provider and expenditure of funds (social capital). This paper responds to the call for greater innovation and collaboration, and suggests ways for universities to work in partnership alongside disability organisations and people with disabilities to be driving forces of the change. The partnership approach provides a strategy for building an evidence base for future development. Dr Jennifer Mays, HumanServicesCourseCoordinator, Queensland University of Technology 11.40 Networking Session: The Solutions Room All delegates can submit questions before the session begins. During the session, delegates will form breakaway groups to discuss the questions that have been submitted before presenting their answers to the rest of the attendees. 12.20 Lunch 13.20 Supported Accommodation in a Competitive Market —— The challenges in supported accommodation in a customer centred world —— The concept of ‘active support’ in supported accommodation services as an approach to create benefits for people with disability —— A showcase of ‘customer-facing’ resources prepared in easy English guides as well as the videos to assist customers, their families and support workers understand how ‘active support’ works David Green, Director, Department of Family and Community Services Deborah Delaney, ProjectManager, Department of Family and Community Services 13.50 Housing and Support within in a National Disability Insurance Scheme: Learning from the Experience of Tenants —— This presentation will detail research evaluating models of housing and support across Australia for people with disability, from the perspective of tenants living in the housing —— Research findings have been gathered using published measures and a customised suite of methodologies, which form an Environment-Experience Evaluation Framework established by the research group —— Enablers and barriers experienced in the built, assistive technology, community precinct and support environments will be detailed —— Virtual modelled housing tours, which communicate user experience of the environment, will be demonstrated —— Each model examined will be considered in relation to the current draft National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) housing principles. Directions for built, technology and community design will be provided Libby Callaway, ResearcherOccupationalTherapyDepartment, Monash University Sophie Moore, ResearcherOccupationalTherapyDepartment, Monash University 14.20 Afternoon Tea 14.50 Affordable and Accessible Housing for People with Disabilities Dr Di Winkler, CEO, Summer Foundation 15.20 Disability Housing QA Panel Speakers from the previous three sessions will come together to answer questions relating to disability housing. Dr Di Winkler, CEO, Summer Foundation David Green, Director, Department of Family and Community Services Deb Delaney, ProjectManager, Department of Family and Community Services Libby Callaway, ResearcherOccupationalTherapyDepartment, Monash University Sophie Moore, ResearcherOccupationalTherapyDepartment, Monash University 15.50 Closing Remarks from Chair End of Summit National Disability Summit Wednesday 16 March 2016 DAY 2
  • 4. Use your QR Reader App on your smartphone and scan this code to take you directly to the website For full terms and conditions, please visit: www.informa.com.au/disability2016 If undeliverable return to: PO BOX Q1439, SYDNEY NSW 1230 3 Easy Ways to Register WEB www.informa.com.au/disability2016 Telephone +61 (0)2 9080 4307 – Quoting P16A03 Email info@informa.com.au – Quoting P16A03 Stay Connected LinkedIn www.informa.com.au/linkedin/healthcare Twitter www.twitter.com/healthcareprof #Disability16 Blog www.informaaustralia.wordpress.com YouTube www.youtube.com/informaoz Google+ www.informa.com.au/googleplus Slideshare www.slideshare.net/informaoz/tagged/disability16 in POSTAGE PAID AUSTRALIA National Disability Summit 15 – 16 March 2016 | SMC Conference and Function Centre Sydney GROUP DISCOUNT Book 3 delegates and 4th comes FREE CONCESSION RATE Concession rate available for person with disability, their family and carers: $100 + 10% GST = $110.00 AUD Pricing Details Register Early Save Early Bird Rate Book pay on or before 1 February 2016 Standard Rate Book pay from 2 February 2016 Conference Package PRICE GST TOTAL SAVE PRICE GST TOTAL Two day conference $1,395.00 $139.50 $1,534.50 $220 $1,595.00 $159.50 $1,754.50 Sponsorship and Exhibition Opportunities: To find out about the various options available, please contact the Sponsorship Manager: Samantha Lister: Phone: (02) 9080 4432 or email: Samantha.Lister@informa.com.au

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