PlSA'S LEANING TOVVER ' CRUISING TO FRF. MANTI. F. ' NORVAY INNS ' VANCOUVER VITH KIDS
r‘; /tun 2:5: +«ku1J, r'—; Tn
2
...
The .201‘2'Je§= (-’p Wra
‘ ' '~“. .,l§1o, re fuel effir, e
~ V v‘ 2
. ;,e, p:_‘es; sr§j. aze; a.tsj‘city/21 h i/ “_mp_g...
-. -.“AL l1(_Jv‘t
{ETD F‘ A
CONRAD
@
Ln v, J1'. I I Tm 5
E mm.
Galrht-nlnn
nwn«~-«v
uwur.
I-DM E WOOD
<=...
H/ X‘/ E THE Ti E
OF
GETTING
HEiTE§‘~. ‘ [W inc" / i 8.
FOLLOW VOUR POINTS TO YOUR PARADISE
WITH HILTON HHONORS".
F...
VOI. L'lVlF. 2.04 NUl1IlF. R (ll
: f'. 'l‘l(’). l. l.
4:4‘
1;‘)
‘ SUMMER ATTHE LAKE
We celebrate that quintessentia...
Danell makes flying through
the air look easy. And with
Citi ThankYou' Points, it is.
Use the points you've earned to ...
14-
The Number
One billirm tourzls-ts
16
The Place
Samoa
18
The Neighborhood
German Village. Columbus
20
The Idea
Dar...
THERE ARE AS MANY
STORIES
AS THERE ARE DROPS IN THE OCEAN.
BEGIN A NEW STORY.
THE ALL INCLUSIVE
crmmu
CRYSTALCR...
S‘ ~. ~» .
‘: .e“€“ Ca;
. _ / C . I"
gggiglt. -’, .» -A » L
4.3139, ! nll(f-i€“‘i°, l,'r”. 'l! l!l'r‘
‘ lfliflll a...
w k M: A I )
SHOW %U ON
Iii? » N
23
. ‘. T VV ""
. ; EL A
, ~
Hh: .r“1A; :r§...
Win 0
5%/ ‘é/ :’feXa4
6/1/VIZ
Enter the
Big Bend Excursion
Sl! 's'EEPS'I'I‘. KES!
One winner and guest will explo...
WP >/ ”‘: ’’: . 1 2// «
«7lta/ Var/ H16
if/ //a? ¢// /2 Mrf / are (an wan, Zxaw AQJ newer / can / a2-a. ea/ /zuwaeznr...
INTRODUCING
THE UNITED
M| LEAGEPLUS"
CLUB CARD.
UNIYED Llii‘-NIL Ci
i. llli'. ii. i PIUS [liili
VISA
- United Club” ...
WELCOME TO
THE CLUB. I I
I - I: l -l
—-__—-~ .
umrso. -1 comseo
The only card to offer United Club” membership...
THE NUMBER
1,000,000,000.. .and Counting
AYBE IT‘S A GOOD THING those superjumbos are plying the skies, because annual
...
Send more than a
postcard from Mexico.
Only AT&T has the
best global coverage.
More phones that work
In more coun trie...
SMART TRAVELER VQ
"‘ ‘ . -Q. .- ‘ _
%v—'-' "'—_ 9 _
a (- rd I,
.'!
Give Me Samoa
OCATEI) BF. TWEF. N Hawaii and New Zealand, Samoa is a young country with old
traditions. Fifty ye...
SM ART 'l‘l{. »’. "l-‘. l.l~'. R
18
n nos Ul~'l'l~; N under-
appreciated capital
l city celebrates its
bicentennial th...
ldvorliurnont
EXPLORE YOUR WILD SIDE WITH A
zooaarro
IT’S ALL THE RAGE THIS SUMMER.
Some are calling it, “the ad...
20
SM. - RT ’l‘RAVl'1L1fR
rru THE IlAJORl'l'Y of
the worlds people
now dazzled the
-i - urban glare, an age-
old purs...
XPLORE ‘IOU! -'n' WILD SIDE W-’ITi. "1' A
A I I
If adventure is in you. Travelodge is for you. ...
SMART TRAVI-‘. I.F. R
THE EVENT
l 7,'. l~iiT: . Let the Games Begin
_ni- vivilniidini w= iim= ,i.
‘ iu'i'A11"s B...
_"-I: of“I'? ;J(-(= nI: ' 51:). -‘aw
35!‘! Jll, Vl= L.4l= |I! !I| ‘.'l‘“|
Starting at just 56,000,
it’s easy to find your AWAY.
When you go RVing, AWAV IS closer and
more affordable than you mi...
.. , ‘ ‘ I :
{L
. - I / /A ,
r «‘ ‘ ~ 1,
1-5 A P'L, .écei*rLe%%n: r's; ?’eA: _>; _>-rrv'= :r41>, ; 7‘
ft : 3 AND A...
SMART TRAVI-‘. I.I7.R
1' gram" 1'ivo'r, ICE enlrs
spray off the skates of
I 1 hockey player Andrew
I . Ference. the...
VASQUE. COM
THE JUXT
It's a long road that leads us to the bonfire. riddled with
weekdays and workdays, corridors and c...
I: REAL TRAVEL]
ll M©Lhl
E
28
Robbed :9 There
May Be an Upside
WELVE YEARS LATER, the memory of that day
in M...
”THE BIGGEST PYRAMID IN THE WORLD?
WITH A CHURCH ON TOP? ”
5 THE PLACE You THOUGHT You KNEW
DISCOVER MORE AT www. v...
I: UNBOUND J
We’ve Got Spirit,
Yes, WeD0
UR MARCHING ORDERS READ: “Show up at
9 a. m. wearing sandals, sunscreen...
Switzerland is in its element with water
because nothing symbolizes the country
more. Water creates landscapes of unique
...
[1 THE INSIDER]
32
r YOU‘RE TAKING a cruise in the eastern Mediterra-
nean this summer, you might see the caps...
I: TALES FROM THE FRONTIER jl
v‘/ (ii
K .
(59
Green Class:
Ready f0TTak£QflP ?
COOL MIST falls as I navigate a...
'_'/ /o], ~
- / M /
Celebrate summer like you
did as a child by visiting
the mountain playground of
Whistler. The refr...
fill? ” . ‘
-. /‘/
There's an art to creating the perfect summer.
An attitude. A mantra. A set of rules that will s...
" ‘TH’, '7.’
. J/ J- “.1
V
HOURS
1'1"
’. ' , "Vi
1/ ‘ _/ 'l / '01‘ / if/4° 7 /5’-
1
n / T?‘ . 'T“
*. J
FR...
_J: ‘nV1n‘, ("*
5-4.. 1
Some people come for our city life.
Cipv ofRocks National Reserve. Idaho.
Adventures in Liv...
38
here feels as if you're in the countryside, "
says Kathryn Pettit, business and project
manager at Cape Towns African...
7*’/ y 1?/ -5:‘
Z‘/ ‘II/0 Z‘o
A/ ora. »(y za'/ / Ae / ’a/ fast/ c,
1?/ /ed cu/ Z‘/7 adi/ e/7z‘L(re.5
in e>(Z‘/ ‘(Io/ ~a’z‘...
I I1‘-~t7.'l'iIl‘ll‘l3‘l‘: ié. ,I
Recognising best practice in sustainable tourism
across the world, the WTTC Tourism fo...
FARl*IS'l'EADS TURN NORVVAY INl'(3 it Bl ll)SUMMl: '.R’S DREAM
By RAPHAEL KADUSHIN
‘I. m¢. §f “Kn-‘l(i"
ha}
The 18508 ...
M4-. evmsh NW” '77
share 70“
locatitms
r route and
with friends
‘gym’ 4ib'S'S'3I'
Lighl_fill. n a cozy r...
F LAVO R
A Slice Q/ ‘Heaven
'l'AS'l'IN(} lBERlC() IIAM IN SALA)‘lAI'CA
N A C()liN'l‘RY Wll l-ZR]-I ham is king, Spa...
44
Kids measure their wingsparw against the outlines of native birds in the rain forest area of the Capilano Suspension B...
Tamron has garnered international
acclaim for its lenses, including
six consecutive EISA awards.
one of the industry's m...
46
, ~‘ . : .7”. (Cr?
‘J 'J? }r” 5/
7" T‘ 7*? ’
“V ‘rm «'
'~ . -“I, -'/ ‘3/‘J' . /1'. J_) ‘
0151*‘-'I'I'Il£-SI...
Wm. 7.39 p. m. PM at mm. 5»/ ,7. / .'a, (p. m.
C%. ecéa/ /it vi/ £4/figtr M/ /he. pm”/ al/6% M405 #0 5501/ I ,0/14¢ /...
I
. /
-4‘-
/ I’
)
fif‘
J4
h finesse—0ne Champagne
toast at a tlme By DON GEORGE
3. J 1_ _
fix 4
/ J at _ _
f i _ i. ...
Call for Nominations
TRAVELERS OF THE YEAR
Amazing people . ..visiting fascinating places . ..doing astonishing things. ...
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
National geographic traveler june july 2012
of 114

National geographic traveler june july 2012

National geographic traveler june july 2012
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Entertainment & Humor      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National geographic traveler june july 2012

  • 1. PlSA'S LEANING TOVVER ' CRUISING TO FRF. MANTI. F. ' NORVAY INNS ' VANCOUVER VITH KIDS r‘; /tun 2:5: +«ku1J, r'—; Tn 2 r“ ; . = L ' Hr’ L-3- us ‘. E')! .'. I.Ier er. Jr , ~ H I , . . mm: u: 4‘ « A I I A E A 1 N JUNE/ JULY 2012 NOBODY KNOWS THIS WORLD BETTER X; _ E, “ ‘ _ gr I J ‘ff A 5 K i A i ‘ A ' t ‘ ‘i K) P. ‘ K l r . 7 » l‘ 7 y ' ‘ x I 11 1 : V_J ' ‘ i i Ghosts o_/ ‘the Lake Vine la Civil l~’Var Escajyes / Montreal! Venturing Into 7 American 25 Reasons the Past ‘_ Classics to Celebrate 1’ ' , n / i I‘ ‘ _ "—-:1‘ 6!’ ’ / .31, 3 I‘ ’ 5 I I if W " _: ~-r . r fir» V. -._‘r_' -. , , .. I; '‘’'i izfiii ‘ J{W}{; A ‘ _ P‘ , _»_ ijfli, an E: 3:: V‘ v -‘ ii“ 711' "1' '7 vr r V in , '!! 'I‘ Iea, ~., I.-A H‘ . ;,taeI. ..e: I;, r:: eI.4;z, AIezee «V1,. E: - -“El: CB1 - 7- A ‘ TR AVE] . F.R. NATION. =I. GEOGR A PH [C ‘COM
  • 2. The .201‘2'Je§= (-’p Wra ‘ ' '~“. .,l§1o, re fuel effir, e ~ V v‘ 2 . ;,e, p:_‘es; sr§j. aze; a.tsj‘city/21 h i/ “_mp_g. ‘ 3 ‘ ” '- , - ' ‘*4 Jeggis a registevqd trad mark 0! Chrys
  • 3. -. -.“AL l1(_Jv‘t {ETD F‘ A CONRAD @ Ln v, J1'. I I Tm 5 E mm. Galrht-nlnn nwn«~-«v uwur. I-DM E WOOD <= $.5‘{'T. ‘.5 TIT) Hm Grand Valcjiitiuns
  • 4. H/ X‘/ E THE Ti E OF GETTING HEiTE§‘~. ‘ [W inc" / i 8. FOLLOW VOUR POINTS TO YOUR PARADISE WITH HILTON HHONORS". Foriongwcui<cndsoi iongci €SCd| ')L'S, HUUl1CUTTEiSlT1Uf~JN:1/ > to use DDIHTS with fewer I’‘§Tl'| (I’ om. HHonor<. PC/ iI'1T§ make planningyoui aCV8"I[Ui'E, /OUI ; _1i>| fgetav. iay‘yourtriptothe spa f‘«1‘. i"! 'fh«1fl(“J(‘F / Virh Hilton HHnn0r9 , (‘vei'vpniiitget: you closer to / our paradise > STAY at ten brands serving every style, budget or occasion > ACHIEVE elite status faster than in any othei piqigidni > USE [)Dii')T§ for own our most | ii»<uri0u§ mites > DREAM aL oi. -‘e’ 3,800 iioLel: . l’l 88 Louiiiiieg >>> ENROLL AT HHONORS. COM >>> / .:u. .~: -: u‘s3-ii. K 5 § vllx I ‘in 7 i. i * 1.‘. ‘ 11;"
  • 5. VOI. L'lVlF. 2.04 NUl1IlF. R (ll : f'. 'l‘l(’). l. l. 4:4‘ 1;‘) ‘ SUMMER ATTHE LAKE We celebrate that quintessential rite ofthe season with seven classic lake escapes in the U. S., featuring Maine. Montana, North Carolina, New York. W'ashington, Minnesota. and Michigan Inlniz/ m‘/ iiin by JOYCF. MAYNARD 6 8 ON THE WAR PATH The author trails Civil Var l haunts on :1 mid-Atlantic driving route that 1'sits i Harpers Ferry, Antietam. i and Washington. D. C. By 'l‘()NY HORWITY. T T’hntugi'<1ph, » by ROBF. RT J. S’/ ..iB() 9 ATASTE OF MONTREAL i From smoked fish to cherry scones. maple syrup to bison burgers. Zest for food spices up this Canadian city ofbon xivants By TcR. -S GRESCOF. I’/ mIugrupI1x/ ;I/ C. /'I‘Hl-IRINI-'. K; 'RN()’i' I oi. ‘-¢: 'xriii'l: im, .. ‘ i E . , * ' T1 . . . "1 / . ‘ : ‘.i . nnIi:1:i, -1.n? ’!i; f’: ’.. -"I6 m - 7-»-.3-‘A’? /_‘ V I‘ , . ,, u¢I"T’:4fl; ?IrI~? I»r . ‘J; ‘uLgT-- , .1‘ 4 . z1I. ... u., _,. -:iIi‘. '1/ . GF. (’)GR. l’HlC . . ‘CT '” . /3 J / .5 JL'Nl’, i‘JUl. Y 2012 'l'H. 'F. l.l<}R : 'l' '3 1}’ . /kg _ V Thejog/ .iv qflazy - ' ‘ ' ‘days-mi UllL1L‘ll(_(’_If__A —~Lm‘e endless. ‘T ‘1 ])r1
  • 6. Danell makes flying through the air look easy. And with Citi ThankYou' Points, it is. Use the points you've earned to travel anywhere with no blackout dates. The Citi ThankYou” Premier Visa Card. Rewarding you every step of the way. To learn more, go to citi. com/ everystep ‘. % '+l‘+'| 1101 aaiis use .1 5 -_ mm VISA SIGNATURE F . '. -
  • 7. 14- The Number One billirm tourzls-ts 16 The Place Samoa 18 The Neighborhood German Village. Columbus 20 The Idea Dark .5‘/ cg (OllI’is7)l L I IN HI 8 Editor’s Note I 10 Travel Talk Dwartments 22 The Event London Olyrnpics 24- The Milestone Calgary Stmnper}eis~ 100111 26 The Person Pro hoe/ rc_y'. s' Amlrezc Ference 28 Daisann McLane Loss becomc. s- her 30 Boyd Matson Lg‘/2» is u purrule 3'2 Christogher Elliott Thu‘/ ‘ea rfizctor 33 Costas Christ Lean. grccnflying 7Tl£lL‘hi71L’h‘ 36 4-8 Hours Cape Town. South Afi‘1'cu 4-] Stay; List Nomuy ’sjirr7rz. s'-(curls 4-3 Local Flavor Ibérico hum in Spain . , ~ 4-4- Family Time Vancrmzier. British Columbia 46 Port of Call FI‘L‘II1(l7ZIIL‘. Auxtrulia 4-8 Road Tri]; Churnpugm: country. France 1 I0 The Icon Tozcer Q/ ‘Pix-zz A church letting out in Samoa, gage 16‘. (i ltli ll‘/1.-lllilkhs rm l‘. |“lv: ' lE
  • 8. THERE ARE AS MANY STORIES AS THERE ARE DROPS IN THE OCEAN. BEGIN A NEW STORY. THE ALL INCLUSIVE crmmu CRYSTALCRU| SES. COM CALL 1.888.688.6797 OR YOUR TRAVEL AGENT Ii’ ~ 2012 Crystal Crurses. Inc, Ships‘ Reg>stry [he Bafiamas,
  • 9. S‘ ~. ~» . ‘: .e“€“ Ca; . _ / C . I" gggiglt. -’, .» -A » L 4.3139, ! nll(f-i€“‘i°, l,'r”. 'l! l!l'r‘ ‘ lfliflll ail’-~ ilillgll -I 'M! lll! l49Il= .I~. ‘I~_" innit Montreal is a food lover’s paradise! You could win a tantalizing getaway for two and experience the creativity of Montréal’s most celebrated chefs. Our world-class food tour includes: Round-trip Air Canada flights for two Two nights at a four-star hotel Tasting menu. East to West in 10 Creations, at renowned Restaurant Europea Seven-course tasting menu, wine pairing, and visit to the kitchen at famed Chez l’Epicier Culinary walking tour: Flavours and Aromas of Old Montreal with VDM Global DMC ! atigIalG99s: aphi;99mlvisitrrmtzeat 3,, (gt , «II{ t ANAL)/ in AND "E SISPPORT EFFORTS TO KEEP THEM THAT ". —' — BELl| iVIN(‘- TH '| ' TO IENH. The lure qfNcw Hampslu'rc’s Sqimm Lake is impossible to resist, even for these (logs. E F, I)ITOR. ’S NOTE : | HI-I l. AKF. . My parents always called it just that. Short, sweet, unembellished. In fact, this marvelous oasis in the deep, emer- ald woods of Ontario beckoned the moment school was out. VVe answered its call for two weeks every summer. It‘s not important where it was (actually, I prefer to keep it secret). We all tumbled . into an old green Rambler—four kids, parents, and a slobbering, bearish Newfoundland. The drive took about five hours, and the refrain all the way was, of course: Are we there yet? The truth is, I am always there. I carry its memories to visit when I'm melancholy, to remind me when life was as simple as sunrise and sunset. The hallmarks of our lake getaways were wonderful and classic: listen- ing to the catchy melodies of the Beach Boys and the waver of the loon, breathing in the pungent pine, taking comfort in a campfired hot dog. For me, the lake has now achieved a sort of mythic resonance, but it is a real place of water skiing, hiking, and canoeing tannin-black streams. Of sunning on granite outcrops and fishing for pike and bass. Of drizzly nights and sunburned mornings. Of playing charades and drowsing off to the snores of my siblings. But the lake is also a place of the imagination, the very idea drawing me in. It is what I like to call the lake efl'ect—the powerful pull of its freedoms and a sharing of space and time that lives on long after we grow up. Now I’m beginning to take my young children to “the lake. ” I want them to build their own sacred memories. And so it goes on. Read more about the lake life on page. 'fi, with essays by contrib- uting editor Joyce Maynard and others. —KEITH BELLOWS OUR MISSION ‘Il'IU' u (. ‘FU(. ‘R wmv rn arr: rn nerowrs ox nrs1'L'. a'rioNs or DISTINCTION AND (‘H. ~RA('Tl-ZR. . ax . -l. "I'H| -iNTlC "SFNSE or R . 1()RI: ' INI"UR. 'Vl. -'l‘I()N, l. 'UI‘I. h'. l‘HJ'I'lI 'l'R'I: 'LI5|(§ . -ND TIIIE LU('. ‘'I'I()NS THEY " "TR -1|'I'. ’l. . N-1 I'I()'-II. lJEO(JR. -II"HI('. ('() | l ' TR. -I | '!: 'I. /S . l'L<CI5' 'ILL BENI; 8 JL'NE: 'JL'LY 2012
  • 10. w k M: A I ) SHOW %U ON Iii? » N 23 . ‘. T VV "" . ; EL A , ~ Hh: .r“1A; :r§I. r.: ‘r % “; *%| fin?1;: ?A: :u{* fi * * * — A | |l]l§I| l”I| l[_! |I[‘l ; . :38 HEN El II: : I: - %§‘:1-‘I: I!Ii ~, ,v
  • 11. Win 0 5%/ ‘é/ :’feXa4 6/1/VIZ Enter the Big Bend Excursion Sl! 's'EEPS'I'I‘. KES! One winner and guest will explore Big Bend National Park's breathtaking scenic wonders and wildlife. Trek, bike. hike. and river raft your way through an action-packed Texas adventure including: 7"? 5-days/4—nights accommodations at the luxurious Lajitas Golf Resort & Spa "*5 Round-trip coach-class air transportation for two 5‘? -‘ Rental car for length of stay $200 in spending money Enter daily to increase your chances of winning! nationalgeagraphic. cam/ bigberrdexcursian HURRY! Sweepstakes ends July 31, 2012. '’ 7/, ’ (1 (1-1: ( / /1 r (‘mm/ H/. NO PURCHASE NECESSARY A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING OPEN TO LEGAL RESIDENTS OT THE 50 UNITED STATES AND D. C., 21 YEARS AND OLDER EXCEPT EMPLOYEES Of TEXAS OEEICE OF THE GOVERNOR, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND TOURISM. VOID WIIERE PROHIBITED SWEEPSTAKES ENDS 7/31/12 FOR OFFICIAL RULES, PRIZE DESCRIPTION AND ODDS DISCLOSURE. VISIT VNAV NATIOIIALGEOGRAPHC CO! -IIBIGBENUEXCURSIONI. SPONSOR HISIIT, LLC. D/ B/A NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DIGITAL MEDIA ll-15 17TH STREET N IV , lVAStI| NtiTON DC. 20035 " , .’V I , A iserbrzez Roast’ N OUR MARCH-APRIL coves sro RY (“Falling for Cuba”), writer James Vlahos says that “Americans alternately romanticize and vilify” the Caribbean island. Readers had similar reactions to the article. “I can’t . tell you how excited I was to see the promise of your cover line, ‘Cuba! The Time Is Now, ’ ” wrote Ralph Perry of Wheaton. Ill. “But imagine my great disappointment to wade through the author's self-centered experi- ences taking salsa lessons. ” The article surfaced fond memories for Kathy VVheale of Greenville, S. C.. who met Julio Mufioz, a Cuban mentioned in Vlahos's story, on a 2002 visit. “At his studio, I purchased a photo of a child riding a pig on the cobbled streets ofTrinidad. It hangs in my kitchen and makes me smile to remember J ulio’s warm family as well as the other proud Cubans we met. I have instructed my husband to grab that photo in the event of a fire. My jewelry isn‘t nearly as valuable as my memories of Cuba—or that priceless souvenir. ’ mzvvlzb UP “Rise and Shine Detroit" (March-April 2012) surprised readers, for better and worse. "As a former resident with family still there, I think the author used a broad brush to paint Detroit into something it's not, " wrote Carole Vesely of Houston. Texas. However, the majority offered accolades for the positive cover- age. “I must say, I have a whole new view of Detroit afier reading your article, " corn- mented Kathy Tudor of Toronto. Detroit local Renetta Kunnath chimed in: “Born and raised here in the ‘50s and 605, I’ve seen the good and bad. My husband and I now live in the suburbs, but every chance we get we go into the city for events, res- taurants, and shopping at Eastern Mar- ket. We wear our ‘Old English D" proudly, at home and on our travels. " EVERYWHERE VISA IS ACCEPTED "I read ‘Access Denied‘ [Editors Note, March-April 2012] while at Zagreb Air- port, “ wrote Anna Boldyreva of Moscow. ‘Tm an active young professional who speaks four languages and loves to travel. The only obstacle: I was born and live in Russia. My first consideration when making travel plans is not what sights I'll see or which specialties I’ll try, but how I will get a visa. Russians need a visa to go almost an_wherc. Imagine traveling more than 3,000 miles from Siberia to Moscow to apply for a visa, waiting two weeks, and still getting refused. I'm not writing to complain but to tell those V] Ps behind ernbassy walls that I will never give up. ” HEAD IN ‘rm: cr. ouos “I enjoyed the photo of the Romanian countryside [Your Shot/ Travel, March—April 2012], ” wrote Eric Hillstrom of Haymarket. Va. “But you missed something: In the cloud, Zeus's face, beard, and outstretched arm are clearly visible. The god of the sky indeed. " TALK T008 I-‘-MAIL: TRAVEL 1'. AlLI'(u . vGs. onc. T‘1TTl-ZR: III . 'ATGEOTRA| ’ELElt. F. -l. ‘F. R()(JK: .'ATIO. ‘'AL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELER. IITTTFRS: TR. -"EL TALK EDITOR, NATIO4'. lL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELER. H45 ITTH ST. N. “'. VASHINGTON. DC ‘£0036-461424. INCLUDE ADDRESS AND D: YTI. II£ I£LE. I'Il0NI: '. NUMBER. Ll£'l"T'ERS 'I: '. I'l, 'BLlSII MAY BE I-‘. X('I". RI'TF. I) OR I7.I)I'TF. I). Sl'MS('RlIH-III SI’*'H'I('I I0 JUNE, «JL'L' 2012 (: '7'. S'ER| ’I('l*T. ('OrI OR (‘ALL 800~N(IS-LINF. L6 I7-51631.
  • 12. WP >/ ”‘: ’’: . 1 2// « «7lta/ Var/ H16 if/ //a? ¢// /2 Mrf / are (an wan, Zxaw AQJ newer / can / a2-a. ea/ /zuwaeznre J/ a/e na/44/xa/ ' Xena? dIl«Zb¢lé‘0 en ftacar / at eon lgfité 514/ .1»/44/-e. 0?. 1441- / -cc/ -ea? /an en/ zf2.rzézJKI lw/ / / Z})e¢Xexr3zKv)e r-man/ a/Lop «Lu / A4 / -/yer exea/ v/mu an /4% /74» 1): (J2! Jaa/1,0 4/ta. /art? !/4/3% eée 1): /efmeezu. /Mr ea/ rezrlaz-e a/ 7/‘var ex. ca»vn. Panhandle Plains 0 Palo Duro canyon amazes visitors with its plunging canyon walls. multicolored strata. and soaring spires and pinnacles. Mountain biking through the rugged yet breathtaking scenery inspires true off—road nirvana. Prairies & Lakes Region 0 Northwest of Dallas. the 8.000-acre Brapavino lake offers rolling swells. perfect for windsurfing. Its extensive shoreline offers more than nine miles of wilderness trails. Piney Woods Region 9 In the Piney Woods ' region. the lakes. reser- voirs. and rivers provide a tisherman's paradise: bass, catfish, and crappie Big Bend Region 0 Big Bend liational Parli's 800.000 unspoiled acres invite scenic exploration via hiking. biking. climbing, and camping, You can also kayak and canoe. or take are always biting. starlit overnight rafting excursions down the Rio Grande liiver. Gulf Coast Region 0 South Padre Island on the tropical tip of Texas is known for its year-round sunshine and flawless beaches. Water sports ofall levels are on tap, including jet skiing. windsurfing. parasail— ing. and deep—sea fishing. % G”? /44! II 10404’ o/ fer tmunfr}/ . South Texas Plains 0 The Rio Brando Valley attracts bird—watchers with its prime location at the center of three major migratory oaths. You may spot more than 500 avia . species. including many tropical birds found nowhere else in the United States. Hill Cou ntry Region 0 Catch the Batmobile, in Rocksprings. to visit Devil's sinkhole State liatural Area, where the main attraction is the summer bat spectacular. Watch the tornado of bats swarm out of the cave for their nightly loraging.
  • 13. INTRODUCING THE UNITED M| LEAGEPLUS" CLUB CARD. UNIYED Llii‘-NIL Ci i. llli'. ii. i PIUS [liili VISA - United Club” Membership - 50% Mileage Bonus: Earn 1.5 award miles per dollar spent—a 50% bonus on the 1 mile per dollar you typically earn. Earn even more on United tickets—2 miles per dollar. - Premier Access" - Free Checked Bags‘ - No Foreign Transaction Fees‘ Annual ICE‘ 95- Apply now and get .1 S95 staieineiil credit after first uor: h.: ise; For more information, visit www. MileagePlusC| ub. com or call 877-227-4245 UNITED NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELER NOBODY KNOVVS THIS VORLD BETTER I PUBLISHED IN I! » COUNTRIES AND II I. ANGL'AGI. -‘.5 OFFICE. ‘ IN VI': <IIl. 'LlT()l'. DC - I(). 'I'1ON - A. ISTERD. ‘. I - IIARCEl. ()I': - lIlI. .N - . IUSCU' - l"R. ’k? UI7 ': R§. ’t‘ - ll»Il('lIARI". .'I' ~ TI"I. :'I' ‘ CuI‘I'' 'I'(. l'I' - lIl"I. I|N(‘i v . I K: RT: - MI"Xl(‘0 (‘ITV EDITOR Ar 'ICl: . I’RI£SIDILN'I' Keith Bellows EXEL‘U'I'I'E EDITOR Noiie Quintos CREATIVIE nriwcron Jerry Sealy SENIOR I‘H(YI‘O EDITOR Daniel R. Westergren SI-ZNIOR EDTTOR Jaywie Irvin‘ . $€()ClA'I'I-1 EDITORS Amy Alipio. Susan ()’Keefe ASSISTANT EDITOR Katie Knorovsky COPY EDITOR Judy Burke I)F. PU‘I'Y kR’I‘I)IRI-‘. (.'I‘OR Leigh V. Borglinsani AS. ANT ART DIRI-'. l.. ‘l‘()R lIol. lie Bates PIIOTO EDITOR Carol Enquist ASSOCIATE PHOTO EDITOR Krista Rossow CHIEF R1-‘SE. -RCI>IE. R lIfll'Il_‘I| 'I‘cn'cll SENIOR RI-LSFARCIII-ZR Meg Vcavr-r MANAGING EDITOR. E-PUBLISIITNG Kathie Garifell GEOTOURISM EI)I'I‘0R Jonathan B. Tourtellot PRODUCTION VIAVAGER David M. Bumeston EDITORIAL BUSINESS MAN. -(}ER Jeannette Kimmel ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR Erin Blnrtk ASSISTANT RESEARCHERS Jennifer Pococlt. Rhett Ih-gist; -r lN11«'. R.lS S-amantha Basliarn, Laura I-‘lanagan. Nicole Glass, Elliott McLean, Ana Santos EDITORS AT LARGE Sheila F. Buckmaster. Custas Christ. Christopher Elliott, Dun George. Paul lklartin, Boyd h‘Ial. OI| , Andrew MrCai1liy, Daisann . IcL1ne. Scott Stuckey DIGIT. ~I. NUM. -D Andrew Evans CO. V'TRIBI.7TI'N(} EDITORS Elizabeth Berg. Carl Hotfman. Raphael Kadushin. Patrick J. Kelly. I‘. F. Kluge. Charles Kulander. Barton Lewis. Margaret Loftus. Rudy Maxa. Joyce Maynard. Andrew Nelson. I-Jdwnrd RCé| (II('I(l‘I‘-I‘Il‘II(ll‘l‘SIJl| , John Roscritlial. Georgi‘ W. Stone C()NTRIBU'I'IN(} PHOTOGRAPI-IERS Massimo Bassano, Sisse Brimberg. Cotton Coulson. lIa: :dutfE‘erton. Justin Guariglia. Aaron Huey. Catherine Karnow. Bob Krist. .IiclIael lklclford. Palaini Mollan. Chris Rainier‘. Jim Ricliardson. Susan Seuben. Dave Yoder IIgI7‘([‘IY‘1I'I'((I liri~gr1!tpr. i-orri ' ‘ 610-5535 MARKET RFSFARCH MAN. -(: l<'. R Tracy Hamilton Stone 1) I c; l‘l‘. L M LDI . nmncrun. CONTENT DEVELOMIENT '/ .ain Habboo SENIOR PRODUCER Carolywi I-‘ox ASSOC]. -T| -‘. PRODl. '( . n / ndn'a IA‘iI(‘ll I’RODUC'I'ION A’ IVl. NLiI". iC'I'URI. Ti S? IORV'ICE I'RESIDE. TI' Phillip L. Schlosser DIRBCI‘()R Gregory SI()| ’l‘I‘ M. -. II. ,'I“. C'Tl. 'RIN(§ WI. -NAGI". R R()l)t‘I1 I. BZITI‘ PR()DUL'TI()N MAN. GER Callie NOI10I‘| SUBMISSIONS Submission «photographs. articles. or other materials is done at the risk ofthe sender; Tim-rIr>r i: :mnot accept liability for loss or damage. 3 L‘ II sc R I l”l'| o. 's Published eight times a year. U. s.. $317.95 at year; Canada. $2-I-.05 (US. funds) . $_’o.5() (US. funds). I-‘or. ription questions. ])lc4'm* call nloo-NGS—LINE. (err; or ). (TDD: ziuo-sin-9797). To subscribe online. xisit i. "r. "r; -.rirr[ionalgeog: ngIiir. mni. I-‘. Dl'I'0RI I. OFI-’ICI-'. IMG 17th St. N. VV. , Vvzesliingtou, D. C. 20036-+65» I'L‘BLlSHl-sll 6: ‘ICl; l‘R| ;SlDL. "l'. GLOBAL . IEDl A Kimberly Cmmaghan NATIONAL BRAND MANAGER John Campbelljarnigfi-I(u' Ilfstom . l)V| £RTI. s NC North America Sales Ofiices I61 Si. th Ave. . New York Y. 10013: 212-610-5500. Fax 2 _ .41-0463 NEW YORK I BRAND MANAGERS Tammy Al>1'a. ham Iabrahanzgi ngsfigg: Hilary Halsteacl hh. r11srm(u' ngsxirg: Doug Harrison rlxi/ zrrrris-(a rigsorg: Kathleen Kertesz A‘A'(’1'll‘. : 'Yi"8.l7I‘". ' Daiiirlli‘ . 'ag_v iluu Z: -ri~r. s.nrx-. - Annette Osmis ansrmsgi rzgsnzg SOL'I'HEAST 8: CARIBBEAN I BRAND MANAGER. ’ TRAVEL Lauiin Ensslin Irrixxliri (iii 1IE'5‘.0Q". ' 2()2-77.5-7I<lM-. Fax: 2()2-H25-5658 SOU'I'IIE. ST I RANGER MEDIA GROUP. INC. Kenneth M. Farber Irengrf mrigegzougcarrr: 770-39!-9905 DFTROTT I BRAND RIAVAGER Karen Sarris k'(Irrr'tl§. 'ri rrg. ‘.0$‘ 248-358-4i3(i0. I-‘a: 248-358-2463 TEXAS ZERO MEDLA Dean Zeko r. lmri(ii : :rlmnii-¢! i'. /I ml; Bruce Homer bruargdzelmnzalirrxorn: -I-G9-232-B636 MlD'l". ST I BRAND MANAGIZRS Bill GI'aII'bg1‘(Ia'(rr'~1lg>‘ Catliy Scott r. sam(ii nr-v. s.org: :II2--I-67-I590. Fax: 312-'Hi7>_)i. iTf ROCRY MOUNTAIN STTATES I FOUR CORNERS MARKI-TI‘lN(; l. ay11e ItIiddIirtoiiliiirrrrru(ér‘irroI. r‘mr1: 9'. ’H——| -13-H54-(). Fax: 928-~4»4-II-H4418 VEST COAST I BRAND MANAGERTTRAVEI. Edwin Conn ermrri gal Il£. (7I‘g. ' BRAND MANAGERS Eric J usten (‘i(). §Il’7l(t'ri ngsxorg: Dana lIzi. skin rlrrxuxlviuga ngx.0r'g: 311)-734--'224(), Fzm: .‘II()-DISH-: 'zl'§01 II. -"AII I DESTINATION IIARK]? I'INCu II_i“AII Debbie Anderson <Ie'b(iierrruIrr. «m gal rlniluimiiimnr: . W00. Fay: KOHATIJ _ CANADAI Pl. 'RI. lCITAS APR Franqoi ‘ Cllalifoiir Q'rrricoise. chaIi[bur(n'i 2Il[JlI(‘IIl15.(‘U17I. ’ 416-363-1385. Fax: «H 6-863-288.‘? MEXICO Br CENTRAL AMERICA Adelina Carpenter rirtrrprriqir [)I’O(lIg_I‘. III’I. IIl. I‘. ‘ l)1l : 'i~I-3-7 '77. Fax: 011-52 " . I. -G. -ZINI: PUBLISH ING . -llMINIS'l‘R. -'l‘| ON II-I-5 17th St. N. VV. . Wasliington. D. C. '. ’()()36—-Mitlfl IJLlSl. 'I-.85 A’ I-'lNA"4'L'li M. (i. ZlNl£ I'LlI5LlSl| lN(i VICE PRESIDENT Margaret S1‘l| II’Il(lI ni.5clinii’rIr(i'z' ugsorg BUSINERG M. -NA(: I-ZR John I’.1ternia. <ter [prm-rinu girl riggogg: .-D'ER’TISING RI: ‘.SILRCII DIRECTOR Jefirey Johnson L'l'o}zrisori§ri’i rigoggs C()N'I'RACIS MANAGER Cindy Ramroop r-rurrirrmpgiri IIé'. .0I‘E'. ’ 202-T75-6781 CONSLT M E R M A R K I-LTI NA‘. VICE PRESIDENT. GROUP CIRCULATION Elizabeth M. Satford 1sn(iord(u‘«ng§. org M A R KI-. 'I‘l Ni‘. 8: I-. 'I-. N'I'$ M. R| ’F. 'I'IN(} I)IRI*'L'I‘0R I’andoi'a Todd prmlrlgi rig. s.or‘g: ‘.202-TI5-6795 IN’! ERNA'l IONAL . I. (‘i. rZlNl-. I‘L‘ IILISIIING ' CF, FRI-‘. iII)I-‘X'l"1'ulia P. Boyle gboylqa rigsarg »C(iOU‘N1S . /IAN. -Gl-ZR Ariel Dciam-I. oIII' iu1i'l'rr<'o] 17 ngsorg. ‘ 202- 7'-S224 @ . 'ot saving this issue? Then please recycle. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCII-TTY CHAIRWAN AND CHIEF IiXIiCL'I'IVE OFFICER John M. Fahey. Jr. PRENIDENT Timothy T. Kzlly EKFILVITVE VICE PRESIDENT AND PR$lDE. ‘l'. PUBLISHING AND DIGITAL MEDIA lkclan Moan‘ EXECUTIVE VICE PRFSI DENT AND WORLDVIDE PUIILISIIIER. GLORAL MEDIA Claudia . iulle_v (‘HAIRMAN EMRRTTUS Gilt): -.fl M. Grosvenor EXPIDRIERS-IN-RESIDENCE Robert Ballard. James Cameron. ’l'nde Da1's. .li| red Diamond. S)‘I’II liarlt-. J. Michael I-‘iny, Ik-mrl_vJaub2n. Dercck Jnubert. mum hmlu-_y', Mcmre I4-akcy. Johan Reinluud. I-Innc SBIB. Paul s. -mm. spmm Wells EDWRKTIII £19712 NATIONM GIDIPAPIIC SOCIFII Ill SIWTS IIISIIIITD MIIIDCIM GIIATIEIPIIIE IIIAVIIIP PIGISTDIDTIIIIXIIJIII ‘ IMEIA REG! -STPAIIA PWITD II ‘III L SA
  • 14. WELCOME TO THE CLUB. I I I - I: l -l —-__—-~ . umrso. -1 comseo The only card to offer United Club” membership, Premier Access? a 50% mileage bonus and more. H PI U l‘. ‘l-r, ~_i; r;' us l_l. ",. l www. MileagePIusClub. com - 877-227-4245 U N I T E D ' VISA
  • 15. THE NUMBER 1,000,000,000.. .and Counting AYBE IT‘S A GOOD THING those superjumbos are plying the skies, because annual international tourist arrivals are set to hit a record one billion this year, according to the United Nations Vi/ orld Tourism Organization. Who's going where, and . . which places are poised for more company? Noted trend expert Glen Hiemstra, founder of Fut11rist. com and curator of Dothe’r'uture. com, scanned the stats and offered his c1'ystal—ball assessment: “The one—billionth tourist arrival in 2012 will be 21 Chi- nese businessperson, part of a group visiting Chile, Peru, and Ecuador to investigate future mining prospects, who with his group takes a side trip to see Machu Picchu and the Sacred Valley of the Inca. ” Hiemstras vision builds on the merging of business and pleasure travel, as well as the growing market in Asia and the rising profile of tourism destinations in South America. The UNVVTO is less inclined to offer such a specific prediction. So who knows? That billionth tourist just may be you. —GEORGE W. STONE 1 av 3" J3’ . " _ ‘H -. vzéfiizngé , «‘ng~‘w: n ; ; 4.’ P 3, V‘ L $ "; 1, _‘ i w
  • 16. Send more than a postcard from Mexico. Only AT&T has the best global coverage. More phones that work In more coun tries. R h‘ kP ‘bl ' 4'-9 attcomgglobal et m 05$‘ 6 g BestLuvemuewuvhlwuleitwntmezlu' Idlf. U‘u‘: ‘l. il]e. v. .irnem / lLiW«ii| U|‘iUii'I[>H'li. liiUlMi'u>3l‘. 'lL&'l&'(]t| llE(l mlwiumuna. ruaiiwiqmtesa. .. ‘ lw. nl. iMliij Tli " Nh| iBlD3lWHL]dlI3|lUlq. |fll ‘-ed Furc ' >35 r. itcs‘an: 5' Io"altl~: ta lip»: -;-. tt(u'ru‘gloin; Scmc-'1 lflaQL‘S3lmL| .3ir3[l L 2l]12AT'cl cl . rup>3it'-, ‘5ci*. n All rights resewed Aim 3: >3 K5.’ D30 dlilii all other l'1dli<S contained herein are il£1(lE'l‘1dli<S of ATM | '1iBHE(iLlal Prcipeuy dI‘Il, i"0l All)‘ altlliated Lom| J;1mes CIZ'plU'. '|V : "ATETP ‘ty 'l| {t| li‘, ‘Ul . dl; e&S" es
  • 17. SMART TRAVELER VQ "‘ ‘ . -Q. .- ‘ _ %v—'-' "'—_ 9 _ a (- rd I,
  • 18. .'! Give Me Samoa OCATEI) BF. TWEF. N Hawaii and New Zealand, Samoa is a young country with old traditions. Fifty years ago, after being ruled first by the U. S. and Germany and then by New Zealand, the nine-island nation became the first Polynesian col- ony to reestablish its independence. During the first week of June, Samoans will celebrate the anniversary with parades and outrigger competitions. Taking place at the same time, the Fifth Intemational Tatau Festival includes live demos of the pe’a—a knee-to—waist ta’ctoo—whicl1 is still applied by the excruciating ancient technique using an ink-dipped comb and a mallet. Gain further insight into fa’a Samoa, the traditional Samoan way of life, at a Sunday church service (98.9 per- cent of the population is Christian). Afterward, many families eat their umu feast of pork, seafood, and taro that has been cooked between hot stones and banana leaves. Samoa’s beaches and lagoons entice, but head inland for Papasee’a Sliding Rock, a natural waterfall slide, and To Sua Ocean Trench, a giant swimming hole. Author Robert Louis Stevenson, for one, was so taken with Samoa’s natural beauty and deeply cherished culture that he lived his final years here. —AI. lSON BRICK _'ATIUNAL GEL)GR_-| "lllL' TRAVELER Clh1‘I)ta>)1>JiA‘H , .i iPj')Hl_'i1 vmar‘ Lzi vow 17
  • 19. SM ART 'l‘l{. »’. "l-‘. l.l~'. R 18 n nos Ul~'l'l~; N under- appreciated capital l city celebrates its bicentennial this year. One of Columbusls longest standing—and most welcoming—poekets lies just south of dovmtovm: German Village. Settled by Ge1'man immigrants in the mid-1800s, the 223-acre community possesses a quiet charm, with its brick homes, wrought—iron fences, and nar- row briek-paved streets. “It has a European scale to it, " says Bethia VVooll‘, owner of Columbus Food Adventures. One ofthe largest pn'‘ately restored neighborhoods on the National Register of Historic Places, German Vil- lage opens its houses and gardens to the public during the annual Hans und Garten tour (June 24 this year). The mostly residential neighbor- hood also harbors some of the city's best local shopping and foodie spots—including a new outpost of. leni's Splendid Ice Creams at 900 Mohawk St. THE NEIGHBORHOOD AWarm I/ l/illkommen in Columbus Skillet (1) With fewer than ten tables inside, the popular brunch spot always attracts a line of locals out the door. E Ll’. /WGSTLW 5 BLEMWER 5: E BECK st )Ci‘1'. ’.‘IFk‘ PA RK AVE COLUMBUS. + ‘mm Pm1Culumbus lml Anpun a German -_- Village 1 E w'>-. vrT‘m gr '71 . lL'‘I'l_‘‘'. lL'L' 2011 But dishes such as the duck and sweet potato hash make it worth the wait. Schiller Park (2) Restored brick homes surround a 2.3- acre, picnic-l'riendly oasis. Free Shakespeare plays um Thursday through Sunday nights in the summer. Old Mohawk (3) This cozy neighborhood bar is famed for its (fa1‘m—raised) turtle soup and bratwursts. Helen Winnemore Craft (4) In operation since the 19:5()s, the treasure trove ofa shop stocks American artisan—made gifis (ceramic drop ear- rings, colorful glass wind chimes). Book Loft (5) A Ger- man Village staple, the store is a labyiiuth ot'32 rooms with books on eve1j'imag- inable subjeet, from boating to bodybuild- ing to business. Lirtdeyis restaurant (lefi) on (1 German Village corner; photo-booth snaps and a martini at Club 185 (top); Schiller Park (above). Pistacia Vera (6) Some say this airy patisserieis delicate maearons—in unusual flavors such as pink gua'ayu: :zI and orange date— rival l. a(lurée's in Paris. Linger over a cap- puccino, or take a box of some sweet treats to go. Lindey‘s (7) Diners have splurged on rib eye and sea scallops at this corner bistro since 1981. Today youll find locals enjoying happy hour on the brick patio. Share calamari 01' crab cakes from the half—ol'l bar menu, which ranges from 84- to 37, until 6 :30 p. m. on weekdays. Club 185 (8) The fare leans to the casual (burgers, meat- loaf), but the buzzing, music- fueled sceneecomplete with a classic photo booth—ma. kes the bar one of Columbuss hottest. —AubreAndrus
  • 20. ldvorliurnont EXPLORE YOUR WILD SIDE WITH A zooaarro IT’S ALL THE RAGE THIS SUMMER. Some are calling it, “the adventure that keeps you adventuring. " Others very originally call it, “something to keep the kids occupied for a few hours—maybe even days. ” We call it a ZOOcation. How ever you want to slice it, it's the perfect way for families with kids to enjoy summer break. It's fun, outdoorsy, active, educational, and, did we mention, adventurous? S0 WHAT IS A ZOOCATION? The brainchild of National Geographic and Travelodge, it’s a vacation spent at, you guessed it, the zoo. The two adventure-minded brands teamed up with participating zoos across the country (only the U. S., sorry, Canada) to help kids and adults explore their wild side this summer. The deal is simple: Stay a minimum of two nights at Travelodge, buy a full-priced adult ticket, and get a kid's ticket free. IS THERE A SWEEPSTAKES WITH A GRAND PRIZE? Good question. Yes, the two companies are also hosting a sweepstakes with an epic ZOOcation as the grand prize, called the Wild Weekend Adventure sweeps. Simply enter* for a chance to win a getaway to any U. S. Travelodge and enjoy a special behind-the-scenes tour of a nearby zoo. Plus, the winner gets airfare, three nights at Travelodge, car rental, and more. ‘Enter the Wild Weekend Adventure sweeps now at NgtionalGqographiccom/ Zoocaligi For details about our Guaranteed Best Rates program, please visit Travelodoecom. Q 2012 Travelodge Hotels. Inc. All rights reserved All hotels are independently owned and operated. "Only available at U. S. Travelodge properties. BEFORE YOU HEAD 0lIT 0N A ZO0CATION, A FEW TH’S. ' Enjoy complimentary Bear ‘fl, Bites Breakfast", high-speed Internet, and more when you stay at Travelodge. While fanny packs are likely to never come back in style, #3‘ carry a tote for all your kids‘ (and your) essentials like tissues, snacks, and sunscreen. ‘.3, If adventure is in you, Travelodge is for you.
  • 21. 20 SM. - RT ’l‘RAVl'1L1fR rru THE IlAJORl'l'Y of the worlds people now dazzled the -i - urban glare, an age- old pursuit has again come into the spotlight: stargazing. . At Australia's Royal National Park south of Sydney, the full: moon brings out a stream of hikers draped in glow sticks. _As well as-helpipg vfith head " counts, the plastic beacons At Utah’sA riches National Park, hikers pause to admire Delicate Arch —and the Milky Way. . lUNE,1Jl, 'L' 2012 stokc the party spirit ofthc _ group, gleeful to stay-up just to see in the dark. Dubbed _ “moonwalks” by outfittcr Understand Down Under, the treks begin with a sunset meal and a nocturnal photog-‘ ‘_ raphy lesson on Wgittamolla ‘ 7 beach and end at sunrise ’ after a night under a sky that guide . ;nd_j Richards calls “surreal. ” In C hile's Atacama it » iiNightiRaiders- 1 Dcsc-rt, stargazing isialxxiziys‘ otherworldly, ‘ but it gets even - more intense in 2013 with the completion of ALMA, the world's most complex tele- scope. (Nezlrby, San Pedro de Atacama has star toursand 21 public observatory. ) That . same Wonder for the cosmos has‘s'pu1'red>the International Dark-S_k__' Association, an i a‘i1ti'—l_ig'ht-pollution group in Arizona, to begin recognizing places that showcase “natural nightscapes” at their clearest. l ‘Among the premier picks: Natural Bridges National- Monument in Utah and Gal- loway Foiest l’ark in Scotland. ‘ “People are delighted to be in true darkness, " says Keith _ Muir, Galloway's tourism ‘ director. “'I‘lie__*'ve. iiever seen ‘ it_before. " —ELAlNE GLUSAC ~ <: ?i‘rti I ii: :i ii: -_-i~ l: l W-i‘l“li‘.
  • 22. XPLORE ‘IOU! -'n' WILD SIDE W-’ITi. "1' A A I I If adventure is in you. Travelodge is for you. Get a free kid's ticket to a GUARANTEED BEST RATES ff; participating zoo when you purchase a fu| |~pn’ced adult ticket and stay a i i_ " W I‘! I‘, minimum of 2 nights at Travelodge’. Now you can enjoy the excitement . 4F4‘3D ‘JEo“o‘3M gfiz. of the zoo along with free lntemet, free Bear Bites Breakfast, and the best rates, guaranteed. That'saZOOcation, Trave| odge—sty| e. ’ Travelodge is a proud supporter of black bear conservation. For detaiis about our Guara't: »2d Best Rates program, please msrt Tra-. iniodgt>. mm 3» 2012 Traimiodgv Hotels, Inc All rights reserved. Ail hot~. ~.': ‘ ~. indoor. ‘-nd-. '~nt2y o-. v‘vd and op'r: it-2d 'Oniy avaiiabée at US. Travelodge prooerlm
  • 23. SMART TRAVI-‘. I.F. R THE EVENT l 7,'. l~iiT: . Let the Games Begin _ni- vivilniidini w= iim= ,i. ‘ iu'i'A11"s BIGGEST public artwork, Anish Kapoor’s bright red “Orbit, ” _ 1 debuts July 27 to mark the opening of the London 2012 Olympics. g nuupml “Hm” '_‘: ._m'M 1, Initially, only those with tickets to a sporting event will be able to T. ,1, _: ,,, ,, , ' ’ climb the 374-foot spiraling observation tower, as it's inside Olym- pic Park, which won’t open to the public until spring 2014. Last-minute tickets may still be found through J etSet Sports or Thomas Cook, but three Olympic events—road cycling, marathon, and part of the tn'athlon—don‘t require tickets. Sawy locals will soak up the sporting action at Hyde Park and Victoria Park, which will present live Qlflflllf: IIIMAIII . ":l». *i'Il| Vl;1l lIi: i=‘--- -II "'l! l;lO'II . -;| ._-ulvml, §Il: ~‘1,= I-‘(If W111!‘ v"3-‘-ll‘/ -Ii coverage on jumbo screens, sports simulators (hockey, handball), and . .. .. free concerts. Mingle with athletes and fans at hospitality houses such 1-1 ,1; ur I'. ‘l: umir‘ I-Ill as Belgian House (based at Inner Temple, a 12th-century Inn of Court) "U '1" '5' and Africa House (at Kensington Gardens). Casa Brasil takes over the “, ,,, L‘, ,!. ‘,, , _, .:. ,., ,m _, .m_. riverside Somerset House and will likely be throwing the town’s hottest Wtlll-‘I Hi party, as Brazil gears up for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. _. M”m", :“| ml; m,. ;_. ,d The city also stages the 2012 London Festival, an arts showcase tuicm, -1 : . . ‘.- running June 21-September 9. On July 21-22, musical stars from every continent perform at six venues around t()wn for a weekend of free music. l'. 'lllt‘If" mu: ma. .1 : I , 'I{| ](_-1|}_~| - , m ‘ l l m The Poetry Parnassus at the Southbank Centre brings together 204« poets, one each from the competing Olympic nations. -RACIIEI. lIOV’ARD SCAN AND PLAN. ‘T ’an 'h stag in area‘ M ‘A, ’I- - r- . i'. iiv- The suslu inably (Icsign ed and constructed Velodrome hosts truck cycling events. i"ii.1’. inniw"lin'i'~ 22 . IL'Nu. iJt'L' 2012
  • 24. _"-I: of“I'? ;J(-(= nI: ' 51:). -‘aw 35!‘! Jll, Vl= L.4l= |I! !I| ‘.'l‘“|
  • 25. Starting at just 56,000, it’s easy to find your AWAY. When you go RVing, AWAV IS closer and more affordable than you might think. TRUCK CAMPER fiffl. TRAVEL TRMLER “EXPAND-’BLE‘ TRAVEL TRAILER SPORT uTiL| TY RV iii-Tli . r.—. I . _, FH'T»l—WHEEL TRAVEL TRMLER TYPE B MOTORHOME fiat TYPE C MOTORHOME Snap :1 photo of this tag with your smartphone to find an R/ dealer. watch videos. and more. . 'l‘[. >R'[‘ 'l'R. Vl’, l.l-‘. R THE MILESTONE Long Live the Rodeo Star i«'. s'n-', i<. ' C. =N. ‘| ).» celebrates 100 years of the Calgary Stampede July 6-15. “audeville star Guy V’Veadick's vision of an authentic rodeo nods to nostalgia and changing times. now as in 1912. (Even its first program lamented that “the great (lays ofthe cowboy have passed”) Today a cosmopolitan oil and gas l)()()lTtl()VI1. Cal; :,‘ar_v pays exuberant homage to its bucking—broncos heritage during tl1e “greatest outdoor Show on l‘]a1'tl1,' when residents trade their suits for jeans and ten-gallon hats to party down frontier style and watch top cowboys get thrashed about by angry bulls. As legendary Calgary-area singer and rancher Ian 'l'yson. the 2012 marshal ofthe opening day parade. says, “The Stampede is a connection from the old days to the contemporary Western lifestyle. " Due to public outcry over horse deaths during the signature chuck wagon race. the Stampede has in recent years instituted strict safety rules. and vets use microchips to monito1' animal health. Must-dos: l’n'cakfast on free pancakes (a'zt"z. ", fl(I])_]'(lt'/1>'](I. l1dt’I'. C0712), wander tepees at the Indian Village, and visit downtovmls Glenbow Museum to see 18 paintings by Charlie Russell—fan1ed for his rich portrayals of the unfeneed West that also showed at the first Stampede. Fora break from the l'airg‘rounds' mini-doughnuts, follow Calgarians to the Alley Burger food truck, serving burgers made from Alberta beef. —. IF. RF, .TY i<ms7.us Stu Illp('(I(’ Pu rlr qflers rodeo events. 711 irlznug rides. gru mlslu ml shows. «ml. /ire-works. 24 . lt''t‘ ‘Jt'l. ' 201;»
  • 26. .. , ‘ ‘ I : {L . - I / /A , r «‘ ‘ ~ 1, 1-5 A P'L, .écei*rLe%%n: r's; ?’eA: _>; _>-rrv'= :r41>, ; 7‘ ft : 3 AND A FEéLnér A A "5 , " c. 1”: -Ar's IM? D,$5 ‘I79 ‘3=0'r2‘ee1j-9?. r iv ‘ "7" f4. I , ‘~71 What’s your idea of AWAY? Wherever or whatever it ts, an RVis the best way tofind it on your terms, your timetable, your itinerary. And it's more affordable than you might__thi'hk. To learn more, visit GoRVing. com and see an RVdealer. ,, ‘ '9‘ _ ' */ «‘, .—£; ,’. _,f_; _‘ V‘ Y . ..,1“Zt*~ ‘ I’ K 3.: 1: >9" ‘ *‘ _~u. .' " ‘ " " 4. . .-‘ . :¢. -. r-. .- II “M V ‘_‘M" Z‘: -,_,1., _._, ,., “ __ . _ ‘Z! ._ ¥w%m'AwAy. ., ~». ..; ..‘; «. ‘. §cLE mggx T’
  • 27. SMART TRAVI-‘. I.I7.R 1' gram" 1'ivo'r, ICE enlrs spray off the skates of I 1 hockey player Andrew I . Ference. the fierce defenseman for the 2011 Stanley Cup—winning Boston Bruins. Outside the arena, 33-year-old Ference treads gently. The avid environmen- talist commutes by bicycle to TD Garden, shares the joys of composting at Boston schools, and discusses renewable energy with MIT students. In 2007, inspired by friend and activist Dzuid Suzuki, Ference lobbed a challenge to fellow National Hockey League players to go carbon neutral, persuading 500-plus athletes to offset their travel emissions and bringing the green move- ment into the locker room. He starred this spring in National THE PERSON Rink Leader Geographic Channels Web series Beyond 1/ze Put/ r. How did you become an environmentalist? I spent my childhood in Canada playing outside—skating on the ice, making tree forts, snowboard- ing. My family had our own garden. “'0 composted. I earned my first income col- leeting bottles from the house to take to the recycling depots. The activism side kicked in when I had kids. I met Dr. Suzuki around then. He pushed me to be more public with m_' environmentalism. What's your take on the global state of the environment? Some people's ignorance toward taking simple steps- recycling, even just picking up trash—to kccp places beauti- ful confuses me. The middle of Africa might have bigger issues to tackle than recycling, but what excuse do we have? It‘s maddening. On the flip side, some cities are initiating incredible programs, from composting to improving energy efficiency, and these days green technology often makes economic sense, too. During the off-season. what kind of traveler are you? My wife and l alwz _vs make friends with locals we meet, like with surf instructors who have helped us. We'll go to their houses for dinner, hang out with their friends, learn what the area is really about. I find it silly to do the same things you do at home. Is travel part of your plan for your kids? Definitely. I want my daughters to learn about life outside our little bubble. Travel is an extension of that. But exposure to the real world isift all doom and gloom: It‘s about looking at what oth» ers value—and what you can draw happiness f1'o1n. Any places change you? Traveling to Kenya in middle school was an cye—opcner. Landing in Nairobi, with crowds following and tugging at us, I couldn‘t quite com« prehend how dificrent it was. And yet we were given great hospitality in communities that have nothing. Getting out of your comfort zone is what travel is all about. ~KEI'I'l-I BELLOWIS Andrew Ference at the Charles River Esplanade. :1 Boston park where he Qflen brings his-fitmily. PHOTOGRAPH BY HEATH ROBBINS
  • 28. VASQUE. COM THE JUXT It's a long road that leads us to the bonfire. riddled with weekdays and workdays, corridors and conference calls. But Juxt gets us there. Comfortable enough to live in. Tenacious enough to venture out. And laid back enough to hang. Truly ready for whatever and then some. Scan to leer" abo vl Vascne‘s heritage
  • 29. I: REAL TRAVEL] ll M©Lhl E 28 Robbed :9 There May Be an Upside WELVE YEARS LATER, the memory of that day in Miami remains with me, tender as an old wound. Sometimes I enter a hotel room, and it sneaks up and surprises me, like the sudden stab of pain when a massage thera- pist digs in too deep. First comes the shock of the broken door lock, the empty closet. Followed by the aches of longing: For the pink cotton dress I bargained like crazy to buy in Ubud, its batik soft as velvet after dozens of hand washings; the clunky, well-worn sandals, entrusted to the shoe minders at so many Indian Hindu temples; my passport, with its two page inserts stamped and scribbled on by eight years of globe—trotting. Lost, all of it, forever. Looking back now, I see I did all the things a smart traveler isn’t supposed to do. My travelers radar was otfhccause I wasnt, by my definition, traveling. This was a weekend in Florida, not three weeks in Florence. I was surrounded by old friends; I was practically home. Any remaining trace of caution I threw into the Windex-blue sea and the warm Miami winds that stirred the dry palm trees and tickled the hair on my arms. As I said, I'd dropped my guard. I hadn't registered the flimsy lock on my door, or other warning signs that would have, in a more foreign locale, made me wary—neglected, mildew-stained walls, spotted carpets bubbling up in the halls. The two policemen who took my theft report shrugged. This hotel had just been sold, they told me, and the staff cut back. Perhaps there were disgruntled ex—cmployccs. Or ones who felt they had nothing to lose by looking the other way. In any case, by gathering my things so I could make a fast getaway, I‘d made one easy for the thief, too. It wasn't the first time I‘d had things I cared about taken fi‘om me. I've lived in New York City for years and been burgled, had my wallet lifted from n1y bag, and had my purse snatched twice. Yet nothing compares to the punched-in-the-gut feeling that overwhelmed me in that hotel room: It was all gone. Everything. The “everything” I lost that morning, amounted to, exactly, one Life on the road holds perils —andpayqfl'1'r. carry—on bag filled with clothes, a pair of shoes, my passport, and a computer. If somebody had robbed these things from my home, I probably would in ve been relieved that it wasnt worse. But when we travel, the scale of things shifts. Were no longer the center of gravity in our small, cozy universe; instead we float without tether in a vast, unfamiliar one. We may travel light, but the things we carry become heavier, infused with the emotional hefi of who we are and where we come from. Our possessions become home. I don”: think of myself as a materialist, but the exaggerated importance I invest in my stuff when I'm on the road can he enlbarrassiiig. Once, I kept. a group of people on a Havana tour waiting 15 minutes in the bus while I frantically ran back up to the hotel room to retrieve the ratty, damp swimsuit I'd forgotten on the hook behind the bathroom door. One summer, I had to fly from New York to Kolkata on a. day when airport security at JFK had ramped up so high that passengers weren't allowed to carry anything with them on the plane except what could fit into a small plastic bag; everything else had to be checked in. “Now the worst thing that can happen, " I quipped to a fellow passenger, “is that the airline loses all our luggage. ” Some- where between New York and the stopover in Heathrow, it did. Eight thousand miles and 28 hours later, this bedraggled traveler staggered into the lobby of I(olkata's Oberoi Grand Hotel like a prisoner just released from lockup, with nothing but. the clothes on my back and a Ziploc bag containing my passport, wallet, and toothbrush. You’re probably thinking this story will end with a sudden epiphany—om shanti. ’—about the unimportance of material things and the liberation that traveling unencumbered by posses- sions brings. But no. I/ Vhat happened is this: I had the concierge summon a tailor while I ran around to the bazaar and bought armloads of exquisitely hand—printed Indian cotton fabrics and shawls, along with sundries, new leather sandals, costume jewelry, and a fat duffel bag in which to lug all of my newly acquired material goods. Thus rccncumbcrcd, I carried on with my travels through East India. By the time the airline phoned, ten days later, and told me it had found my luggage, I had almost forgotten I‘d lost it. It surprised me a lot that I rebounded so quickly. Like gas filling a balloon, all the items I collected in Kolkata expanded to fill my empty travelers bag, and heart. That's when it hit me: The ache I feel for things that have gone missing while traveling isn‘t completely about the things themselves. Lurking within that pain is a darker shadow of sadness, the realization that eventually life's losses will amount to fa. r more than Balinese summer dresses and beloved clunky sandals. The anguish of losing something small when we travel makes us tougher, better able to handle the next unexpected loss down the road. I still feel a sore spot in my soul when I think of that long-gone passport with the amazing visas. Still, I am grateful to that Miami thief, and to travel, for the rehearsals. I DAISANN MCLANE is an erlitoratlarge. Follow heron 'l'z. "'1'ttcI: (x_I‘Daisann_McI. anc. JUNE, /JULY 2012
  • 30. ”THE BIGGEST PYRAMID IN THE WORLD? WITH A CHURCH ON TOP? ” 5 THE PLACE You THOUGHT You KNEW DISCOVER MORE AT www. visitmexico. com Kl‘-‘Ix . |-, H. !l-; ' -; ‘-| :‘'. |‘-'V‘ I- ’ ‘ _u/ vjv, _I_ _| 'a '. .3 at u ‘at 'n —. . 7 v - . . . 7 v . . . . . . . v '-*1-. ’ >7 ‘. 0 '95‘: _ "32 "z. 1‘. .. -nu, ‘«”‘: “~r» - tr 9 E v V 6'-' " : ".' “'. » . ~--‘. .'s'‘ . . : 'r r_‘. ,,_ g -- . H ' ' 3", . . : , , '_, > . #"~l— ; "'("ff
  • 31. I: UNBOUND J We’ve Got Spirit, Yes, WeD0 UR MARCHING ORDERS READ: “Show up at 9 a. m. wearing sandals, sunscreen, and sunglasses. We’ll take care of the rest. ” The rest, I’m now discovering while pulling on garish, flowery surfboarder shorts, is an homage to Jimmy Buffett, or what Vogue would call “a fashion don't for men. ” But on the Fourth of July in Telluride, Colorado, traditional style rules go up in fireworks. That’s particularly evident on Colorado Avenue, a six-block stretch of asphalt where the town and half the surrounding counties gather to celebrate. It’s also where I and 29 other guys will be sporting stuffed parrots on our heads. Telluride on the Fourth is everything I love about small-town parades. Its a celebration that captures the spirit of America—the idea that every voice should be heard, every person encour- aged to speak up to say a collective “Happy Birthday, America! " Tellurides parade is the ultimate in participatory democracy, because even those not marching come dripping in patriotic regalia. In heart and costume the performers and spectators are one. I‘ve been to the Rose Parade, the Macy‘s Thanksgiving extrava- ganza, and other classic events where it seemed you were there to cheer for the celebrities and applaud the workmanship of profes- sional float builders. Sure, seeing a rolling depiction of man landing on the moon, constructed of hundreds of thousands of delicate roses, inspires oohs and aahs. But in places like Telluride, you're at the parade to applaud your family, neighbors, and friends. The floats might be kids waving in wagons pulled by their parents and civic clubs tossing candy to the crowd from the beds of pickups, spaced out among dogs in bandannas and folks on Harleys. Over the years, I‘ve witnessed this same spirit in numerous small towns, such as Crested Butte, another old Colorado mining community turned resort town. At one parade there, participants included ladies in saloon-era dresses on roller skates and anyone who owned a unicycle, a pre-1970 car, a horse, or a pair of stilts. My favorite float was a flatbed tractor-trailer with a zip line, on which United we walk: Small-town parades go big. the mayor rode over a burning fire pit and landed in a hot tub at the other end. Presumably, the message was “Let's party, America! ’ VVho wou| dn‘t cheer that sentiment? Best ofall, in Crested Butte, the parade always ends in a townwide water fight. Back in the mid-nineties there was one group in Telluride noticeably absent from the spectacle. Oh, these rnerrymakers would wear the red, white, and blue on the sidelines and cheer loudly for those who did march, but they lacked the confidence to step onto the main stage, probably because they didn‘t play instruments, didn’t look good in sequins, and most of all were incapable of lear'ning the simplest dance rnoves—or even marching in step for m01'e than three paces. But in 1997, local Stu Fraser (now the mayor), after watching his wife, Ginny, march in a group called the Rauneherettes, decided men should also have the pleasure of making fools of them- selves in public. Six months later, he voke up in the middle of the night, turned to his wife, and grunted, “Men without rhythm. ” She replied, “The parade. " That briefdialogue, which might be worthy of analysis in a different magazine, launched Stus all-inclusive concept. That 2 am. revelation is the reason that on this Fourth of July, an hour before the start of the parade, I‘m sipping ma. rga. rita. s ir1 a parking lot with a group of individuals trying desperately to master Ginny's choreography for “Margarita- ville” and “Cheeseburger in Paradise. ” After we rehearse both songs a couple of times, the jury is in, the verdict unanimous. We are all starring in the role we were born to play: Men With- out Rhythm. There is some question as to whether the half hour of practice or the half hour of drinking better pre- pares us. Over the years, Men Without Rhythm have, to paraphrase Thoreau, marched to the beat of a variety of drummers. One time it was Elvis; another year it was the Blues Brothers. The most embarrassing costume, according to Stu, was the Disco Chicks year, when the guys donned bright skirts and rainbow clown wigs. The most elaborate concept was the wedding theme, which included a real eight—minute ceremony, right there in front of the judges‘ stand. The guys carried canes, performed “Puttin‘ on the Ritz, " and wore top hats, bow ties, and white gloves. Bottom line: If you are ever in or near a small town in America on the Fourth of J uly, go to the parade. And if you feel like marching or dancing, join in. Based on my experience, at least for one day, you'll feel as though you're part of something bigger, something special. A word of caution, though: Your outlandish getup won't receive the same reaction any other day. As part of our uniform, the Men Without Rhythm also wear temporary tattoos of cartoon characters. Mine is a Tinker Bell decal on my neck. The day afier the parade, at the airport, the Transportation Security Administration agent stares at me for a minute, then asks, “Do you have a granddaughter? " I hesitate. Its a security question I’ve never been asked. Finally, realizing shes staring at my neck, I mutter a vague explanation. Then I hun'y toward my gate before she orders a full-body search. I Editor at large Bovo MATSON hosts National Geographic Weekend on the radio. JUNE! JUL' 2012 ‘T l‘lIl‘t
  • 32. Switzerland is in its element with water because nothing symbolizes the country more. Water creates landscapes of unique beauty, highlighting Switzerland's spec- tacular mountains and tempting visitors to be adventurous, to relax and have fun — there's so much water around that you're never more than 1 mile away from the nearest waterfall, river or lake. Water is an exceptional source of inspira- tion. It's unique and the special perspec- tives it offers invite a host of summer activities. Switzerland is proud to call itself Europe's reservoir. The rivers rising in its mountains flow into the North Sea, the Mediterranean and the Black Sea. Visitors can enjoy the pure natural resource in many ways. Clear mountain lakes invite bathers to take the plunge, walking trails hug vast reservoirs high in the Alps and run alongside the rivers or past dramatic waterfalls. Historic steamers and ultra- modern ships ply the famous lakes and refreshing all natural mineral water adds sparkle to meals! Switzerland has an ama- zing 40,500 miles of rivers and streams, no fewer than 7,000 lakes, countless thun- dering waterfalls and one more unique na- ture experience that we owe to water — our mythical glaciers of eternal ice. In summer, there aren‘t more refreshing places to linger than by the water and Switzerland is an expert in summer relaxation - just dive in. Plan a trip. “MySwitzer| and", the official iPad app from Switzerland Tourism, provides valuable information to enable you to optimally plan your vacation. Whether it's a summer adventure or a city trip, it will inspire you with ideas for a perfect vacation. Here. just learning about the exciting experiences awaiting you is going to be an adventure in itself! .50]. um! -— illicnunlflollu ‘Ii-*l1i_fl_i(I~]', '[I'fl; |‘it-m5L, gj0]n -‘V ‘/ /// //.7;
  • 33. [1 THE INSIDER] 32 r YOU‘RE TAKING a cruise in the eastern Mediterra- nean this summer, you might see the capsized hull of the Costa Concordia near the Italian port of Civi- tavecchia, off Giglio Island. The partially sunken ship will likely dredge up an emotion fi'om deep in the subconscious of many travelers: a primal fear that their own cruise ship will sink (or catch on fire as another Costa vessel did earlier this year), that their hotel will bum to the ground, or—the mother of all travel phobias—that their plane will fall out of the sky, exploding on impact just like in the movies. i Up to 13 percent of people fear flying at some point in their lives, according to psychologist Jonathan Bricker ofthe University of Washington, though many experts believe the actual number is far higher. And up to 1 in 10 has a fear of drown- ing. (Avoid the 3-D version of Titanic if you fall in that category. ) “I'm really worried, ” said Betty Westbrook, a reader from Allen, Texas, who con- tacted me after the Costa sinking to see if she could cancel her Caribbean cruise. She told me the news coverage of the accident made her rethink the idea of a vacation at sea. (She eventually went and had a great time. ) It's enough to make anyone reach for the Xanax. My own personal travel nightmare is getting swept away by a monster wave. Being evacuated from my Hawaii hotel after a tsunami alert last year—a false alann, fortunately——didn't help. But what, really, are the chances any of our hidden nightmares will come true? Here, the actuaries who compile risk tables might work better than anti—anxicty pills. The probability of your next cruise goin‘ all Titanic? No reliable numbers exist, so I crunched my own out of the publicly available statistics. Not counting the recent Costa Concordia incident, it's 1 in 6 million. Death by tsunami? For the average landlocked American with two weeks of beach vacation, its highly improbable. 'I1rns out were far more likely to be hit by lightning: a probability of 1 in a million annually, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (although as a Floridian, I have worse odds, says Fred Kilboume, who, as a matter Fear factor: the Costa Concordia earlier this year. of fact, is an actuary). As for the odds of dying in a commercia. l jet crash: around 1 in 11 million. A word about the numbers quoted here: They range widely, depending on the factors used, but while experts can quibble over the specifics, they agree on one thing: These are highly unlikely events. So if the people who run the life insurance numbers aren't worried, maybe we shouldn‘t be either. I-Ieres even better news: If your plane does crash in the U. S., there's a 95.7 percent chance of surviving, according to the National Transportation Safety Board. Another common tourists fear, dying from a terrorist attack, is similarly improbable. Of course, there again, it depends on how you define “terrorist” and “tourist. " But any way you look at it, there are other things far likelier to kill you. In fact, the attack you should be concerned with is a heart attack, since you're 23,976 times as likely to 0X'pIl‘C from heart disease as from an evil-doing extremist. To paraphrase pop psychologist Wayne Dyer, why worry about the things you cant control? Instead, worry about the things you can control. Like what? “'I‘rafl‘ic accidents, ” says Alex Puig, a regional security director at Intemational SOS, a travel assistance company based near Philadelphia. "More than anything else, they represent the main risk—anywhere, but especially in a foreign country. ” Indeed, an average of 3,287 people die in a car crash every day around the world, and your odds of perishing in one are a brow—raising 1 in 88. You can reduce those chances. Puig recommends that if you’re traveling abroad, you leave the driving to some- one else unless you know the roads well, which I interpret to mean you were born and raised there. Other- wise, hire a driver or take some other safe and reliable mode of transit (think train, not rickshaw). Herc’s another statistic that travel- ers so focused on dying in a fiery or otherwise graphic manner, like a shark attack, rarely consider: If you‘rc visit- ing a developing country, there's a 5 to 8 percent chance of requiring medical care. Hospitals can be iffy; you might get taken to a clinic that approaches U. S. standards, or you could have your broken bone set by the local medicine man. Fortunately, you aren‘t completely subject to the Fates here either: You can buy travel insurance and a medical evacuation plan, carry a first-aid kit, and of course take common-sense precautions such as not swimming in an area where sharks have been sighted. Not only are we fretting about the wrong things, but we don‘t know when to stop. As this magazines reader advocate, I spend a fair amount of time fielding frivolous complaints from travel- ers who are torqued that their travel agent screwed up the dinner reservations on their cruise or that the pool in their hotel wasn't open during their stay. People, I sometimes want to say, you didn‘t drown and you didn’t pick up a nasty norovirus. Enough already. So next time you travel, plan for things you can control. And do all your worrying in the cab on your way to the airport, which is arguably the most dangerous part of your trip. I Editor at large Cnmsrormsa ELuo1'r writes about consu mer travel issztev. l5—maiI him at celliott(a‘ings. org. JUNE, !.lUL' 2012
  • 34. I: TALES FROM THE FRONTIER jl v‘/ (ii K . (59 Green Class: Ready f0TTak£QflP ? COOL MIST falls as I navigate among moss- eovered trees and clumps of nettles, grab- bing at vines to pull myself up Mount Visoke in Rwanda It’s 1987 and mountain gorillas are teetering on the edge of extinc- tion—there are fewer than 300 of these great apes left in the wild. My guide stops suddenly and motions for me to get low to the ground. He grunts, alerting the gorillas that humans are in their midst, then he slowly parts the underbrush: Ten feet away is a family of five; the silverback gazes at me and then continues digging up shoots to eat. It remains one of my most indelible travel memories. fil Today, thanks in part to tourists visiting with distant primate cousins in thejungle, the mountain gorilla popu- lation has more than doubled—a step back from the brink of extinction. An incredible achievement. Ah, but here‘s the rub: To reach these precious wild- life enclaves travelers must fly, spewing carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and accelerating climate change that threat- ens the Earth we aim to protect. So how do we get air travel right, both now and for the future? Its a nagging issue that airlines are increasingly under pressure to address. Aviation actually contributes some 3 percent of global carbon emissions. Compared with deforestation, which accounts for almost 20 percent of harmful C0,—more than all forms of trans- portation combined—that isnt much. Yet more planes are taking ofi" each year and releasing carbon—up more than 11 percent from 2005 to 2010. In response, airlines are investing heavily in green technology, like upgrading old fleets with newer, more fuel—ctIieient aircraft. Case in point: Singapore Airlines recently added to its popular JFK service the Airbus A380—one of the most advanced planes in the sky, which has the potential to bum some 20 percent less fuel than most other aircraft. In April, Japan Airlines rolled out the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, billed as the world’s first “eco-friendly" airplane for its lighter composite construction, fuel-efficient engines, and improved aerodynamics (proponents compare it to d. riving a hybrid car). But on a planet already facing The fitel eflicient Boeing 787 Dreamliner. the impact of climate change, from the bleaching of coral reefs to the shrinking of sea ice, many say it is not enough. In January 2012, the European Union demanded that air- lines reduce emissions or pay a pollution tax in order to land on European runways. But many airlines are balking at the potential price—$67O million ir1 2012 alone and predicted to rise, according to one study. More than two dozen countries have objected to the rules as expensive and unfair. One airline that has agreed to abide by the new EU rules is Virgin Atlantic. "We need to be thinking much bigger, ” says its vision- ary founder and CEO, Richard Branson. “Vl/ e have to r'eplace the conventional dirty fuels we rely on that are destroying the planet. ‘ Branson has pledged more than a billion dollars toward altemative- fuel research in a bid to change aviation history. Last October, Virgin announced it is getting closer: Using technology to recycle industrial waste gases from steel production, it has developed an alterna- tive fuel that Branson claims will halve the carbon emissions of today‘s standard jet fuel. Virgin plans to launch the first “demo” flight within the next 12 months and begin long-haul routes in two to three years. “This is a major step toward radically reducing our carbon footprint from air travel, " Branson told me. That is the kind of approach needed so we can maintain the conservation benefits flying can deliver: In Brazil, nearly half of the Pantanal, arguably the world's largest freshwater wetland, has become a giant holding pen for the becfindustry; that tourists are “filling to travel there to see its rare wildlife may help save it from destruction. And in the seas from the Philippines to the Solomon Islands (the famed Coral Triangle), home to more fish and coral species than any other place on the planet, tourism dollars are a key incentive for governments to create marine reserves as a refuge from high- tech fishing trawlers. All of which keeps me taking ofi' for far-flung destinations. Until we can fly green class, whats a well-meaning traveler to do? Here are a few stop—gap measures: Buy carbon offsets from a reputable, independently audited group (two good ones are mvclimate. org and climatecare. orgl so that when you take to the skies, the carbon emitted is neutralized by renewable-energy projects. Also, that old travel tip to pack lighter has a new green meaning—fewer pounds of luggage add up to a lot of fuel savings. Book yourself on the most ecological route—routeRANK. eom is a travel search engine endorsed by World VVildlifc Fund that can help you do that. And consider longer but fewer trips: Beyond the carbon savings, you'll benefit from the deep dives into local nature and culture. What‘s next on my bucket list? Indonesia-is Tanjung Puting National Park on Borneo. In this remote rain forest frontier resides another distant relation also dangling on the thread of extinction- the orangutan. Tourism is helping to keep that thread from break- ing. Call it the power of travel. I [Editor at large Cosras CHRIST writes about the chalzgilzg world rf travel. l§—maiI him through 'lravel_'Ihlk@ngsorg. . lATIL)l'AL GEL)GR. -l7llIL‘ TRAVELER 33
  • 35. '_'/ /o], ~ - / M / Celebrate summer like you did as a child by visiting the mountain playground of Whistler. The refreshing air and stunning scenery will immediately lighten your soul and fill you with youth- ful enthusiasm, and that is only the beginning. An escape to Whistler will revive your memories of perfect summers as you explore the lofty peaks, plunge into the clear mountain waters, or unwind in the valley. 0171 Advertisement e to Whz'stler’s . -. II "O' . " . ‘, , I ‘ . . ' ‘J - . .-i . - - Mountain Memories While skiing on Horst- man Glacier extends into summer, Whistler's slopes flourish with adventure as the weather warms. Moun- tain biking is thrilling for all levels with expert terrain, a bike park, and easy trails for beginners, all accessible by the expansive lift-service. Hiking trails can be found throughout the area's diverse ecosystem, and for spectacular views and access to alpine meadows and lush rain forests, the PEAK 2 PEAK Gondola ride is unsurpassed. Wonderful Waters Soaking inWhistler‘s majestic mountains while dipping in the fresh lakes is the best way to cool off during a warm day. The sandy beaches of Lost Lake Park are prime for lounging and picnicking ’, '“J T . .7:-. ~ . -.1' R, ‘ *- .3. - ' 1 ea‘. W14.” '~‘. n{ mg. ..» 560:7 sf-! .'. 'i». ‘. L‘i. §‘-es‘. ‘ ‘R , ‘_. 4.‘ - la» 1. I. ‘ . __v x. ‘ 9-; . .k" L . with the whole family- even the dog! Alta Lake offers beach volleyball courts, children’s play spaces, and plenty of room to relax. Nearly every water source in the vicinity offers canoeing, kayaking, and swimming. When the snow melts, the rivers run rapid and offer white-water rafting with many excursion options. Anglers will head to pris- tine freshwater streams for rainbow trout, Dolly Varden char, or salmon. Valley Views Run, rollerblade, or bike the 40-kilometer Valley Trail that connects the verdant parks, beaches, and lakes in the valley. The picturesque, pedestrian-onlyWl-iistler Village draws crowds for its distinctive shops and restaurants. Stop over at Olympic Plaza for events T I or to view memorabilia from the 2010 Games, and stroll the stone walkways to find entertainers and musicians amusing visitors and locals alike. Four signature golf courses pepper the area and offer some of the best opportunities to see the alpine vistas. %/ xwi-: Is1'LER ERITISH COLUMBIA Visit Whistler. com for more inspiration and all your trip planning needs.
  • 36. fill? ” . ‘ -. /‘/ There's an art to creating the perfect summer. An attitude. A mantra. A set of rules that will set you ill‘! Whether you're in the mood to chill, connect, meander or adventure. you'll find 16 ways to make the most oi your summer vacation at '. ‘HlL‘lI-.313‘. 't' )5 , . ' - ’ i‘ / ' (‘V ‘ P . _ H . ___ 4*} ‘. ,/ ‘ ‘I . - 1/ V'__'_ 1. tin? !‘ . ._, . (£9 I/ d‘ ‘ '3 ‘ ' .4-L, ‘ "f 5.: ~. «I EXPLORE ALL 16 OF THE RULES AT v. ,- -'r- -- ‘r->5 mr 2'. :, .-. ... -r: ‘
  • 37. " ‘TH’, '7.’ . J/ J- “.1 V HOURS 1'1" ’. ' , "Vi 1/ ‘ _/ 'l / '01‘ / if/4° 7 /5’- 1 n / T?‘ . 'T“ *. J FROM Pl£NGUIllS TO POLITICS IN THIS WORLDLY SOUTH AFRICAN CITY ‘-1 1' VlNl-ZY/ Rl'). ‘l MAI‘ surround ‘ ‘‘ it, and oennphiles may sip glass after glass at its waterside cafes, but there's more to Cape Town than wine. This sunny coastal . city, long divided between the vealthy metropolis and oul. l)ingtoI. 1islIips, was revitalized by the 2010 World Cup, with improvements to public transporta- tion and the grimy downtown area known as City Bowl. Main (lraws include hiking, kite-surfing, miles ofsandy beaches, and it world—class shopping and dining scene, all less than an hour and a half ‘.4: drive to the storied Cape ofGo0d Hope. Neverthe- less, ongoing racial tensions—though not a By KAREN LEIGH threat to visitors‘ safety in central areas of town—are a haunting legacy of apartheid. WHAT TO DO After it multimillion-dollar renovation, the Robben Island Museum, where former President Nelson Mandela spent 18 of his 27 _ve2.u's in prison during apartheid, reopened to the public in 1997. Visitors arrive at the World Heritage site by ferries departing from a waterfront ter- minal and are taken to what used to be the island's ma. ximun-security prison, where they scc MandL‘la‘s cell. The island also serves as a nature conservation area, home to the African penguin and herds ofspring- bok, South Africa's beloved national mascot. The frequently foggy flat top of Table Mountain, in expansive Table Mountain National Park, dominates this city‘s every vista. Most tourists opt to take an aerial cahleway, which reaches the top in five minutes, though there's 3. steep path all the way to the summit for hardy hikers. Once there, replenish at the Table Mountain Café. Visitors meander along level hiking trails or simply admire the view from a bench near the nIountain's edge. On the other side of the park is the Sil- vermine Nature Reserve. Once a site of Dutch silver prospecting, it}: now a popu- lar spot for a. leisurely stroll and features at wlieelchair-accessible boardwalk. "Being ‘in. '1,. .»; .'. E, '*‘7IIl£,4-13-/ IJ/ . ': ' -'1zm. .:1tL: u : "3f: m> — fl7‘: :w: )tTr: ’l’JT‘7.I‘; ‘1av_l-/ itigtv-ts-t-_ -. .‘,
  • 38. _J: ‘nV1n‘, ("* 5-4.. 1 Some people come for our city life. Cipv ofRocks National Reserve. Idaho. Adventures in Living. "V / "1 ‘ . I ‘E9.- ‘ ‘ c_"~V r . _U , | ||HI/ /,/0 S 'ENmno ”z, :f: —,_ ’ / / S 2 5 IDAHOV 5 ’» ACA'noN : °"’5‘WAYs .3 _ .3’ l_, _r_ 9 FEATUR| NG YOU _. j3'éiEi o. o"3.“: .“ CAST YOURSELF fl YOUR FAMILY IN AN . uagaa Wzlcome lo £S3V| SlTlDAH0-ORG/ MYID
  • 39. 38 here feels as if you're in the countryside, " says Kathryn Pettit, business and project manager at Cape Towns African Impact, 3. leading volunteer-tourism organization. “The lake is always warm and a deep red in color. " At the foot of Table Mountain and cover- ing more than 1,235 acres, the Kirstenbosch National Botanic Garden was the first gar- den devoted to flora native to South Africa. A sculpture garden displays contemporary African stone artwork. Easy—to—follow trails wind through fynbos (shrubland) a. nd mountain forest. The strenuous Smuts 'l‘ack (named after former Prime Minister Jan Smuts) traverses Skeleton Gorge. In summer, a Sunday-evening concert series brings out residents and tourists. In a sprawling art deco building, the South African National Gallery's permanent collection includes African and European art, beadwork, masks, and sculpture, and its temporary exhibits showcase local talent, such as Peter Clarke, whose multimedia works have made him one of Cape Town's most acclaimed artists. Nearby stand the Houses of Parliament. with their porticos, red walls, and towering white columns. Dating back to 1885, the complex includes the Library of Parliament and is the site of the annual State of the Nation address. Buy tickets for the public gallery and check out the live parliamentzuy sessions (only allowed the first six months of the year), or take a guided tour of the facilities. Afierward, walk next door to the Tuynhuys. South Afiicas ofiicial presidential l residence. From its famous steps in 1992, former President F. W. de Klerk announced that his country had “closed the door" on apartheid. wr»rr-nu: 'ro snop Situated on atree-shaded, cobbled square in the business district, the opcn—air Green Market has aisles packed with jewelry, textiles, paintings, and curi- osities from every corner of South Africa- but be prepared to haggle. Musicians and other characters populate the square, built Fork restaurant (above) looks out onto nightlife hub Long Street. During apartheid, Nelson Mandela spent 18 years in Robben Island Prison, now a museum (top). . lUNE; 'JLYL' 2012 in 1696 as a trading post; find a good bench to sit and people-watch. The Victoria and Alfred Waterfront is Cape Towns epicenter for shopping and dining. More than -1-50 retail outlets have set up shop here, flanked by a breezy seaside boardwalk. Check out the Victorian Gothic- style clock tower and then hop a ride on the 131-foot-high observation wheel. Surrounding an outdoor courtyard, the shops at Cape Quarter Lifestyle Village- a development in the chic Green Point neighborhood—scll contemporary African crafis, locally designed fashions, and home decor. The Quarter is designed in the Cape Malay architectural style influenced by the area's Dutch settlers, with dark beams and multicolored facades. The Red Shed Craft Workshop. on the V&A Waterfront, provides an alternative to megamall glitz. Bargain hunters troll stalls for recycled—glass vases, antique silver jewelry from Ethiopia, and hand-painted cushions in safari animal shapes. WHERE 1'0 EAT Long Strect—a traditional backpackers hub—is lined with one-of-a- kind craft shops and eateries in every price range, open until early morning, when Cape Town's liveliest avenue finally closes dorm). The menu at Long Street Cafe. located in a former bookstore, runs the quirky gamut from Thai wraps to waffles and ice cream. Join the cosmopolitan crowd for Wednes- day night karaoke. Down the street, Lola's lists its fare on a chalkboard: sweet corn fritters, anchovies on toast, and steamed west coast mussels. At Fork. the seasonal small-plates menu ranges from decp—fried goat cheese with port-and-onion marma- lade to mini kudu (antelope) fillets with chili potato puree. In Camps Bay, an affluent area sand- wiched between white-sand beaches and the far side of Table Mountain, Camps Bay Retreat hotel holds a traditional South African braaz’ (barbecue) on Wednesdays and Saturdays amid impeccable lawns, herb gardens, and restored fynbos ($39 per person). Roundhouse. in 211786 former guard sta- tion, features contemporary South African cuisine and a long wine list. Its more casual, outdoor sister, Rurnbullion, serves picnic- style breakfasts and lunch pizzas with expansive views of Camps Bay and the Twelve Apostles mountain range. Though its decor and formal ambi- ence now come off as a bit dated, La Perla in beaehy Sea Point has become a local legend since opening in 1959 (Marlene Dietrich once ate here). Stick to the fresh seafood, and request a seat on the recently refurbished terrace, a popular spot for “sundowners, " the British colonial tradition of outdoor sunset cocktails. I
  • 40. 7*’/ y 1?/ -5:‘ Z‘/ ‘II/0 Z‘o A/ ora. »(y za'/ / Ae / ’a/ fast/ c, 1?/ /ed cu/ Z‘/7 adi/ e/7z‘L(re.5 in e>(Z‘/ ‘(Io/ ~a’z‘/162'/ ‘y n(<fa/ -d/ /aha/5Cqpe5. I can‘: ma/ Z‘ to start exp/ or/ :33 _ H Navigate Norway with our Digital Nomad Follow the adventures of Andrew Evans, National Geographic Travelers Digital Nomad, as he explores Norway's wild side! He'll hike granite peaks, sail the country's famous fjords, and unlock Oslo's exciting rhythm. amazing places, as National Geographic Traveler brings you the best informa- tion to inspire adventures of your own. FOLLOW HIM On lwitter @WheresAndrew READ ABOUT HIS JOURNEY! NationalGeographic. com/ digitalnomad Andrew will share his minute-by- minute Norway discoveries online and right to your phone. Follow NAT| oNA| _ along to fall in love with Norway. GEOGRAPHIC test your travel IQ, and discover . COM
  • 41. I I1‘-~t7.'l'iIl‘ll‘l3‘l‘: ié. ,I Recognising best practice in sustainable tourism across the world, the WTTC Tourism for Tomorrow Awards are among the highest accolades in the global Travel 8. Tourism industry. Winners are recognised as Winner of the Community Benefit Award SAUNDERS HOTEL GROUP Winner of the Conservation Award INKATERRA truly inspirational champions of responsible business practice. The future of Travel 8. Tourism goes hand Winner of the Destination Stewardship Award DESTINATION RGROS beauty and diversity. That's why W C exists to maximise the sustainable growth of the industry in a way which will conserve and protect our environment Winner of the Global Tourism Business Award BANYAN TREE HOTELS & RESORTS for the enjoyment of all: local people. businesses. wildlife and tourists alike. in hand with the future of our planet in all its natural E Strategic Partners: - U Travelport ‘ TOURLS_MFORTOMCRROW. COM
  • 42. FARl*IS'l'EADS TURN NORVVAY INl'(3 it Bl ll)SUMMl: '.R’S DREAM By RAPHAEL KADUSHIN ‘I. m¢. §f “Kn-‘l(i" ha} The 18508 Net; Gard berl-rmd—breaI(fiu; t is a traditional Normegia nfitrmhouse overlooking the 128- m ile-long Sognefiard. _ HF. L'l’Sl‘. RT(fHlC resort, complete with the inefitable martini bar and spa, may be taking root just about everywhere these days. But in Norway, the trendiest things going . are the eent1n'ies—old fannsteads that have been converted into a1l~purpose Nordic getaways. The top—of—the—world retreats are at their best in the summer, when the diversions include everything from river rafting to alfresco concerts, and the views are particularly ethereal. True, you wont see any stylish infinity pools out- side _vour window. But the timeless curve of a Norwegian fiord should make up for that. OLD G UARD The pastoral Nes Gard inn sits at the end of the Sogneijord, Norways longest and deepest ijord, and the most appropriate approach is by boat from Bergen (express buses and boats also stop at the nearby town of Sogndal). The circa 1850 bed- arid—breakf-ast, on land owned by the same intrepid family for nearly 200 years, fea« tures a total ofl4- rooms (nine with private bath), and the inn provides enough actinl ties to approximate a Nordic triathlon. Guided and independent hikes on more than 30 marked mountain and glacier trails take you past Feigum Waterfall, one of Scandinavia‘s highest, while bicycle day trips along lakeside roads take you to the oldest stave church in Norway. But you can also dive into the fjord, paddle a rowboat, hire a motorboat, and ski the nearby moun« tain peaks even in mid-July, in the land where things are slow to thaw. "Or our guests can just pick the sweet cherries, plums, and apples from our orchard, ” says manager Asbjorn Manum, who knows fisitors will be content to sit and enjoy the scenery. From $78 per person per night. A ROYAL I-‘IT Vest Norway‘s charming Eide Gard offers four guest rooms in its bed—and— breakfast overlooking a shimmen'ng slice of the Olensfjord. The homey rooms are a typical haven of ean'ed wooden beds and duvets embroidered with colorful floral garlands, but it was the culinaiy flair of owner Johanne Marie Heggcbo that lured Norway's Crown Prince Haakon and his wife to the outpost in 2009. While guests can hunt for mountain cloudberries them- selves, most prefer to let Heggebo source her own ingredients fo1' a loeavore feast. "I like to make dishes with a flavor ofthe area, )I; TlU. 'AL Ul3UL; l(_-l'llIL' Tl{. 'ELl_‘l( 4«l
  • 43. M4-. evmsh NW” '77 share 70“ locatitms r route and with friends ‘gym’ 4ib'S'S'3I' Lighl_fill. n a cozy room at Sygard Giytting, afamiI_y-rim inn andfitrm that dates lu 1300 neurLiIIehummer. Norway. like salmon or a soup made of blue niussels, " she says. Also evoking the flavor ofthe area is the flee. <:ta. ndi1ig summerhouse where I Ieggebo serves the food, in front ofan open fire, while guests sit on benches cushioned b__' sheep fleece. From $173 fora double room. MOUNTAIN MUSICALS Located in south«ct-ntral Norway, -H miles north of Lillehannner, Sygard Grytting is one of Norway's oldest wooden hotels. During the summer season you can slumber in the 700-year‘-old “laiigloftjl the only medieval hostel still in use in Norway, where the spare accommodations are limited to bunk beds. But most guests opt for the comfort of the 17th— to l9IlI—CClltuI‘_' log buildings featuring rooms dressed up with lace curtains and iron beds with pillowy duvets. Dining at the inn is one ofthe high- lights for guests. Home-cooked meals are prepared with lamb from ea]. the farm, local elk and reindeer, and fresh lake trout. The farms family in Y . . . . . . ' and for help if berries are turned into comforting C0l)l)l(. ‘I'S. Fittingly, Hilde and time. Send Stig Grytting, the 1Gth—generation owners ofthe inn, make sure 1 need its stay as guests get a dose of real cultural innnersion. In winter that means yo d as you'd like sleigh rides. But summer offers a full calendar of outdoor events, connecte even from including mountain concerts of Norwegian folk music and the epic via satellite 3 t lakeside performance, in August, of Henrik Ihsens classic play Peer the top of Mt. Everes ' Gym. From $91 at the langlofl and 8173 for the other buildings. cool It's Pretty . MIDSUMMER DREAMS Situated abo'e the Nordfjord in western OT com Norway, Nedreberg is as much an opcn—air museum as 21 rustic ad wuss? e . inn. Guests can join the 1nonthl_f knitting club in the 19th-century It/ IILIILZ IT I£1'FIL(P< <1/EM lfi E 3' -W-1-- Q3 schoolhouse, feed horses in the riding paddock, learn how to bake Norwegian flatbread, and brew beer in the summerhouse kitchen. The farms museum exhibits pay homage to regional textiles. The most popular guest rooms are in wooden houses spread out over the farmstead, which offer decorative wooden beds painted cherry red. By June, once things thaw, the more adventurous can make the . ‘50—minute hike up through hills to the summer farm, where there are three beds, aloft for children, and the sleep-inducing music ofa mountain river flovidngjust outside. From $87 at the summer farni and 3258 at the inn. I Ready for Adventure Q “E” 42 JL'Nr; .'. iL'L'2o12
  • 44. F LAVO R A Slice Q/ ‘Heaven 'l'AS'l'IN(} lBERlC() IIAM IN SALA)‘lAI'CA N A C()liN'l‘RY Wll l-ZR]-I ham is king, Spainsjmnrin 7'l2r’rz'eo reigns supreme. Though other dry-cured Spanish hams abound, the pricey, rosy-hued, and deeply flavored Ibérico ham comes from a unique source: native Iberian pigs raised in Salamanca Province and two other regions in Spain. Sold throughout the country, the hams are on full, delectable display in the his- toric heart ofsalamanca city at the Mercado Central. :1 1909 public market next to Plaza Mayor. Here, 17 butchers carve thin, oft‘-the-hoofsliees from a range of lbéricos, including top-of-the-line bellota hams from free-range pigs on an acorn diet (about $59 per pound). For the best selection, locals recommend the counters of. Iavier Vicente or Ilijos de Nicolas Hernandez. One block away, in the modern dining room ofRestaurante Tablanca, chef Carlos Barco goes whole hog—literally—oflering ham by the slice but also Ibérico pork dishes like an entire roast suckling pig and slow-cooked cheeks flavored with vanilla. Thirty miles south, the faint fruity and nutty whifl" of ham on the streets of Guijuclo is one clue that Ibérieo production hap- pens in this workaday tovm. During Spanislt-language tours of ham-maker Julia'n Martin ($40, reservations required), you'll enter a Virtual cathedral of ham suspended in dark cellars, try your hand at carving, and sample bel- Iota han1—washed down with good Spanish red wine. —cH1us'rorHER HALL Slices qflbérico hum are carved by lmml and best sampled without any comliments. N, 'l‘lU. '. L (; l_'ULilt. ‘l'lIlL’ 'l'l(. 'l_‘LEl( iiiivanirziren’ READY FOR With SPOT and SPOT you'll be safer, more prepared, and better connected. SPOT has initiated more than 1,700 rescues worldwide via 100% satellite technology and provides numerous ways to stay connected while off the grid. Also, check out SPOT Adventures, which lets you share your adventures, photos, videos. and more via Google Maps 5' Your adventure is ca| |ing—get ready! Find out more at fli 1‘ Ready for Adventure in. lt'Vi| ‘ ~. i m i-li
  • 45. 44 Kids measure their wingsparw against the outlines of native birds in the rain forest area of the Capilano Suspension Bridge. ‘j - 1, 1‘ T*- _ x"—(’. —‘""'. ?4'? ‘ 1-’ (. -’’F’*’, .-’4'’’. -’ ‘. ’“€fi’fl¢y4E‘lvfVN(. lflfi‘lll§q‘lF J’. l. /Car‘ -'‘‘, x .511’. I“. /I‘ ry L ‘V. /?‘4.v". ~"/ ‘R. /'4" '”/ I’/ ‘ijl-. /2". GET YOUR GRASS STAINS ON WITH THESE OUTDOOR ADVENTURES o Dl£Sl‘lNA’l‘I()N rolls out the green carpet better than Vancouver, British Columbia. This city, filled with more than 200 parks, dou- bles as a giant playground, poised . . . on the Strait of Georgia. “Sum- mer is the perfect time to visit Vancouver, ” says Patricia Thomson, executive director of the Stanley Park Ecology Society. “If it's a hot day, you can enjoy sandy beaches 01', in a two—minute walk, pop into cool forest trails to see trees more than 600 years old. “ TREETOP TRAILS Crossing the Capilano Suspension Bridge has been an I-dare- you experience since 1889. At the year-old Cliffwalk, follow suspended and canti- levered walkways, some of them glass, edging a sheer granite face high above the canyon. Then, step onto the +50-foot-long suspension bridge 230 feet in the air over . lUNE; 'JL'L' 2012 By LORA SHINN the Capilano River. Across the canyon, kids take the lead at Treetops Adventure. a net- work of cable bridges and platfomls at bird- level viewpoints; listen and look for herons and woodpeckers. MOUNTAIN HIGH Only 15 minutes from downtown Vancouver, Grouse Mountain offers a ski resort inside city limits. On a clear day, board the Sviss—engincered Skyride gondola for the one—milc ascent (a vindow—facing spot may offer glimpses of wolves). At the resort, :1 golden eagle hunts prey at the Birds in Motion demo, grizzly bears nuzzlc at the Wildlife Refuge, and rangers clue kids in on fun facts, such as how barn owls are the stealth bombers of the bird world. The on-site Lupins Café dishes up Canadian poutine (french fries smothered in cheese curds a. nd gravy) and views of Vancouver Island. PARK PLEASURES Larger than Central Park in New York City, Stanley Park cori- nects North Vancouver's mountains with the city. Rent bikes and cycle the parks seawall past a collection of totem poles at Brockton Point. More than 40 miles of fir-scented hikes thread through the park; glimpse a beaver lodge along the Beaver Lake Nature Trail. Board a miniature train and chug through a temperate rain forest. TOP FLIGHT For a serious thrill, climb aboard a seaplane with carbon—neutra1 Harbour Air for an aerial tour of the city, surrounding parks and beaches, and North Shore Mountains. The propeller-powered planes take off and land in Coal Harbour. As you swoop over the citys Granville Market and the Convention Centers grass-covered rooflop, you may find that green islft just a color but a Vancouver state of mind. I
  • 46. Tamron has garnered international acclaim for its lenses, including six consecutive EISA awards. one of the industry's most prestigious awards. Fix: iJ isriff 27/2-'1'irriiei; iuIi3|: ~vi' ‘3 4l“J"im) Eip0sLire F6 3 ‘ '64‘? sec: 50320 NE Auto Handheld 5 mg! anqiii ‘iE(r'It‘i ivy.1.ii‘»'4 HI I iu 28 V iii, Eimsiiv-3 KS 6 H1600 sec i$O32C' -. '.‘P. A. ilriHnrvrilii1r1 18-270mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC PZD Astonishingly compact and lightweight, this 15X all-in-one zoom features Tamron VC (Vibration Compensation) to eliminate blur caused by camera shake, along with a fast. quiet PZD (Piezo Drivel autotocus mechanism. Reveal more of your cameras potentiai and capture the moment with outstanding clarity and sharpness with Tamrons all-in-one zoom. (Model B008) TI-I'I'| FlDI'| New eyes for industry www. tamron-usa. com
  • 47. 46 , ~‘ . : .7”. (Cr? ‘J 'J? }r” 5/ 7" T‘ 7*? ’ “V ‘rm «' '~ . -“I, -'/ ‘3/‘J' . /1'. J_) ‘ 0151*‘-'I'I'Il£-SI*IIP EXCURSIONS IN FRl£1V‘IANl‘Ll£, AN EASYGOING AUSSIE TOVVN xcr: AL'sTri. r. r.~'s roughest port ‘ I town ruled by those ofill repute, ‘ | Fremantle or "Freo, " 30 mimrtes , southwest of Perth, dramati- cally changed in the 19505 with a new wave of European irnmi— grants. Then in 1983, after Australia won the America's Cup and Fremantle looked forward to hosting the sailing race in 1987, the locals rejoiced and the towns streets became lined with cafes, boutiques, muse- ums, and buskers. The revelers may have dispersed, but the party stuck around. SEAFARERS, ARTISTS. AND Mlsr-'1'rs Check out the America's Cup winning yacht and an ol(l pcarling lug3:, er (the boat pearl-shell divers operated) displayed at the modern, steel—and—glass Western Australian Maritime Museum on Victoria Quay. Nearby, stroll the 15—acre Fremantle Prison and discover its gruesome past as you 1'sit the gallows where hangings took place on Monday mornings right up until 1964-. In 2010, the limestone prison was the first building in Vestern Australia granted UNESCO World . IL'rNI_“'. lL'L' 2012 By CARMEN JENNER Heritage status. Climb down steel ladders to the labyrinth 65 feet below, where pris- oners were ordered to hard labor in the tunnels that served as 21 water catch merit. On Wednesday and Friday nights, meet at the prison gatchouse for a guided, torchlit tour. Make your own great escape to the neo-Gothic Fremantle Arts Centre, built by convicts in 186+ as a criminal lunatic asylum, to ficw one of the largest collections of local and Australian art in the state, and watch live performances in the intimate cour1yard. (4 hours) ISLAND WILDLIFE Join Capricorn Seakay- akjng for a guided paddle to the Shoalwater Islands Marine Park that encompasses Seal and Penguin Islands. Bring your binoculars and View up to 16 unique seabird species seldom seen on the mainland, including whirnbrels and the Caspian tern. On Penguin Island, watch fairy penguins—the worlds smallcst—bcing fed at the Penguin Island Discovery Centre. Snorkel alongside dol- phins and explore limestone reefs in the islands underwater wonderland. (6I1ours) BEACH IT The coast is dotted with glori~ ous beaches, but you don't need to travel far to dig your toes into the sand. Bathers Beach is located within walking distance of downtovm Fremantle, making it an ideal spot fora refreshing dip and for exploring the historic West End bookstores and gal- leries featuring Aboriginal artwork. Ifthe brilliant white sands and calm waters of the Indian Ocean beckon, then swim or snorkel at Port Beach. ()r head to Cottesloe Beach along Marine Parade (5 miles north of Frcmantle) for its shady Norfolk pines and endless coastal views. (3 / murx) GO r-‘rsn Cast a line for snapper and mullo— way at the Fremantle Fishing Boat Harbour, a historic working port with some +00 fishing boats. Ifthe fish aren't biting, join locals and visitors alike for fresh seafood (including crabs, oysters, and crispy fish and chips) at the 109-year—0ld, farnily—owned Cicere| |o's. Afterward, tour the airy Little Creatures Brewery. located in a former boat yard, and enjoy a cold ale on its deck with Views of Rottnest Island. (3/1uurs)I
  • 48. Wm. 7.39 p. m. PM at mm. 5»/ ,7. / .'a, (p. m. C%. ecéa/ /it vi/ £4/figtr M/ /he. pm”/ al/6% M405 #0 5501/ I ,0/14¢ / ‘U? 54/2:/ //Fe: /M7’ £rrou/ l.5¢~‘I4£ +—S »— See C- , ,_. ,__j. _ , ___C_{ F1201? Dffivn sfrne Gov-Jmor, Econom/ c Du‘/ moun: um‘anc Tmmsn: V Z; /47?'m/ var 0/an /0a/ / 1}): Ze—A_c‘tz. J‘. 7/7/0»/ /I/1‘; /fir/ /' (7/1 -2: 7rT, w, ; r/1.. //4")/ /// /‘(‘ / I/' / :7 n/ -.«/ fir / V”/1/’ 7(: ,’r/ -J ‘Ff/ ///6' 7/-'r7,: /(’/ ‘G; //:74 ,7?’/ /fl/ Ir/ I1/‘L’/ /// I/UL; Gil/ r/(’ u2z. v/ Jr’-xm; ; '/. r// 7/: «,~/ n/‘jay r/ I/I1‘ ‘V; Cy/ .,' (I I/ V’/4!/ /(‘ (~/ :/Ir-/ ' (‘I / /1:/ /I/ . ’ . XISSI()i'. 'l‘l‘I. AS ]‘u«. m-(1 In-l~. 'n-1: l]u- : ‘<»| li1:: ‘: llillx (ii Rmuzi 1:| l41 {luv ~-I1-lip in-. <,| uw ul . x»:11iL ]’<. <[n' I| .|1(]. i~~i«m 1m<1 ifl v.1<: .i. mL pun} in'i5m. uing unJ7i| n-. Cmiiv Wpilili gull. 1{rl‘'rLl'I. Him HI‘ lrilic 1ni| c,~<>i lmH> m‘[1(| chin)‘ llnpigfl $~>L1l| i Tc'_i~ '-. "i| «§My at tin‘ ‘<»r'l«l Hirwiilxgz ('‘ll| 'I‘ Hn: «1«]11mlvI’~(‘L H. r<li: ir: .:lH11lli~ Zi‘ Vvnzwr , l(). iU; lH‘l(H'IIIVSULIIIE‘| ‘L‘: (7)HIA1()Ui‘[. ”'1'-r'Ii. i‘f‘. L[HZ'iH: 'I'M‘lrvlli | 'n. ..« 'li~. |~ | ’r.1{l4‘I’l]_ 1‘n*~li. |‘ an ()n (mini 37 ;7'. )]3 «'(i(l—. 'a. ‘V'l)—‘_’/ —(il) ‘, HIlil)[h‘}}. :|Ul)«’I (lH'.1 An 4&7 MISSION _i TEXAS The Greater Mission Chamber of Commerce
  • 49. I . / -4‘- / I’ ) fif‘ J4 h finesse—0ne Champagne toast at a tlme By DON GEORGE 3. J 1_ _ fix 4 / J at _ _ f i _ i. _. .. :4 Al Celebrate Joan of Arc’s 6 00th birthday
  • 50. Call for Nominations TRAVELERS OF THE YEAR Amazing people . ..visiting fascinating places . ..doing astonishing things. If you or someone you know is a traveler with extraordinary passion and purpose. tell us. In our December issue. we'll honor ten Travelers of the Year—gung ho g| obe—trotters. dedicated voluntourists, and green-minded adventurers who inspire us all to take on the world. Deadline for nominations is July 1, 2012. NATIONAL G EOGRAPH IC TRAVELER HI | _TO N Hilton HHonors proudly supports the Travelers of the Year Program. —‘ celebrating the experiences of travel and honoring achievements . / H H O N O that are changing the world, one trip at a time.

Related Documents