Preventive Maintenance
It saves more then it costs….
866-432-9771
Hydraulic Training Associates, llc.
A Publication of...
Introduction………………….….………….…4
Preventive Maintenance……………….….5
Scheduled PM Program……………………6
Operator Responsibilities…...
For most Companies and Government agencies, fleet/equipment services impact the delivery and cost of nearly every service ...
In a perfect situation all repairs to every piece of equipment would be completed in a planned preventive maintenance (PM)...
Scheduled Preventive Maintenance (PM) is the heart and soul of all efficient equipment management operations. An effective...
Perhaps the most essential concept of a PM program is flexibility. Each organization must establish PM service parameters ...
An operator has a responsibility for his/her particular piece of equipment and is expected to inspect this equipment daily...
Scheduling Preventive Maintenance
Scheduling intervals allow for a determination of when and how often a PM activity will...
PM intervals and service levels are initially based on manufacturer recommendations for vehicle or equipment maintenance. ...
Hours – Trip characteristics of some vehicles in fleets require significant engine operating time although the vehicles di...
Servicing of equipment can be thought of as having progressive stages or levels. There are three levels commonly identifie...
The Maintenance managers processes the preventive maintenance schedules for vehicles/equipment. The reports should be gene...
// Page 14
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
Not all equipment will need the same check list, supplied here is just one example of ...
// Page 15
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
Safety inspections and preventive maintenance of vehicles is the key to a good equipme...
// Page 16
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
All maintenance and repair work, including quick fixes, are issued a Repair Order or a...
// Page 17
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
Another way to identify equipment repairs needed is through the Pre- Trip Inspection F...
// Page 18
PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
Conclusion
By implementing a PM Program effectively, real time savings and reductions...
If you’re interested in improving your mechanics knowledge, getting help with your PM service or would like more informati...
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Preventive maintenance e book

It saves more then it costs.... Preventive maintenance and reactive maintenance are an extremely critical part of any fleet operations. By creating a Preventive Maintenance program to decrease the incidents of equipment arriving late for the PM’s they are due for, this program can be an integral part of cost savings and reduction of equipment downtime for repairs.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Services      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Preventive maintenance e book

  • 1. Preventive Maintenance It saves more then it costs…. 866-432-9771 Hydraulic Training Associates, llc. A Publication of Hydraulic Training Associates, llc.
  • 2. Introduction………………….….………….…4 Preventive Maintenance……………….….5 Scheduled PM Program……………………6 Operator Responsibilities……….………..8 Scheduling……………………………………..9 Service Intervals…………………………….10 Service Checklists…………………………..12 So What Next?.................................13 PM Forms……………………………………...15 Repair Orders and Pre-Trip Insp. …….17 Conclusion……………………………………..18 Call To Action………………………………...19 TABLE OF CONTENTS: PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
  • 3. For most Companies and Government agencies, fleet/equipment services impact the delivery and cost of nearly every service provided to the public and impact the productivity of nearly every employee, support emergency services making the difference in every citizen in the City, and support maintenance of infrastructure which helps support local economy and quality of life. Preventive maintenance and reactive maintenance are an extremely critical part of any fleet operations. By creating a Preventive Maintenance program to decrease the incidents of equipment arriving late for the PM’s they are due for, this program can be an integral part of cost savings and reduction of equipment downtime for repairs. If the Preventive maintenance program is working correctly the reactive maintenance should decrease as well. The reactive maintenance is the repair request that is written up by the operators at the end of their day. These repairs must be completed overnight enabling the crews to continue their work in the morning. Introduction: // Page 4 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
  • 4. In a perfect situation all repairs to every piece of equipment would be completed in a planned preventive maintenance (PM) program. From the time a equipment was purchased until it was sold, all repairs would be predicted and prevented. One hundred percent of all shop labor and parts would be attributed to preventive maintenance (PM). Shop scheduling would be much easier. Breakdowns, road calls, and downtime would be virtually nonexistent. Equipment would be safe and dependable. Operating costs would be minimal. In the real world, however, this does not happen. A scheduled preventive maintenance program is a systematic method of planned, proactive system inspection along with servicing and repairs performed at specific intervals. Effective equipment management requires that repairs be made before failure. This involves a preventive maintenance approach to provide for systematic, periodic servicing of equipment to facilitate operations minimum downtime. Planning and scheduling PM activities requires providing the right maintenance at the right time at the lowest overall cost. Combining these factors requires fleet managers to understand operating and maintenance characteristics to customize an effective preventive maintenance program. // Page 5 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Preventive Maintenance
  • 5. Scheduled Preventive Maintenance (PM) is the heart and soul of all efficient equipment management operations. An effective PM program will reduce peaks and valleys in repair volume. Sound PM programs enhance risk management. A well- maintained vehicle is usually a safer vehicle. A well maintained system is also a safer piece of equipment to operate. In addition to safety, the documentation included in a proactive PM program can be invaluable in the courtroom. // Page 6 Scheduled PM Program PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
  • 6. Perhaps the most essential concept of a PM program is flexibility. Each organization must establish PM service parameters specific to its own budgetary and quality constraints. The demand on maintenance budgets too often restricts a quality proactive team to facilitate Preventive Maintenance properly. Subsequently mechanics are reduced to reacting to breakdown after breakdown rather then approaching each piece of equipment with the intent of facilitating fluid, filter or belt changes as required in a timely fashion. Breakdowns will happen as units are operated, but the stress of chasing breakdowns and having them pile one upon another tends to discourage and disappoint even the best mechanic. Managers and owners press ever harder to see production increased with equipment that isn’t able to meet the demand. Proactive rather than reactive is always less stres.” // Page 7 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
  • 7. An operator has a responsibility for his/her particular piece of equipment and is expected to inspect this equipment daily, checking tires to ensure proper inflation and condition, checking for fluid leaks, lubricant levels, belt conditions, battery connection and cleanliness, lights, signals and horn, windshield wipers, and wiper fluids and reporting any problems, if a tracked vehicle then inspecting the tracks for problems or looseness. For equipment which requires a Commercial Driver’s License, federal law dictates a specific driver checklist. Vehicle Service Technicians need to know the details of daily operations and defects. // Page 8 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Operators Responsibilities
  • 8. Scheduling Preventive Maintenance Scheduling intervals allow for a determination of when and how often a PM activity will be performed. Local usage and environmental conditions, as well as manufacturer’s recommendations, should be taken into account when establishing PM schedules. Typically, companies and agencies indicate that their PM program schedule is determined by: • Manufacturers’ recommendations for routine maintenance inspections; • Incremental indicators such as mileage, elapsed time, engine hours, or fuel consumption; • Service levels to determine what will be inspected and what maintenance tasks will be carried out at various service intervals (done in addition to general, routine tasks; also can be sophisticated enough for the scheduling of non-normal PM, e.g. brake pad replacements, etc); and Technician availability, shop designation, and user convenience. • Adjustments to schedule – increased or shortened intervals – based on a particular experience s due to particular use and availability of equipment, etc. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE // Page 9
  • 9. PM intervals and service levels are initially based on manufacturer recommendations for vehicle or equipment maintenance. In addition to guidance from manufacturers and other outside sources, fleet service managers or equipment service managers use a variety of other resources to customize their PM programs, notably the past performance of similar equipment, history files, other’s experience with similar equipment, and demands made on vehicles or equipment, such as continuous service, dirty operating conditions, and extreme temperature ranges. The following are the most common measures of service intervals other than manufacturers’ recommendations. Time - Time is frequently used as a PM service interval. In systems based on time intervals, vehicles and equipment are serviced annually, semi-annually, quarterly, monthly, and daily or by hours of service. For example, setting a PM schedule up to service a unit every x-number of miles or x-number of days will ensure that even if the odometer data is corrupted, the unit will be rotated into the schedule for service and will not be overlooked. Mileage – Is a common method of determining service intervals. Vehicles using mileage as a service interval are scheduled to be serviced after traveling a predetermined distance. This is a time proven method that is most effective on units that have high mileage or high hours of operation applications or trip patterns. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Service Intervals // Page 10
  • 10. Hours – Trip characteristics of some vehicles in fleets require significant engine operating time although the vehicles display a low mileage rate. Engine hours are often a better indicator of wear and, therefore, are a better indicator of PM requirements. Construction, stationary and heavy equipment often have hour meters as opposed to mileage odometers. This equipment mandates hours as a service interval. Total Fuel Usage – There are several reasons that companies have begun to use fuel consumption as the criteria for PM interval scheduling. Combined with recorded travel distance, or hours of operating time, fuel consumption realistically reflects what is happening to an engine. An automated fuel transaction system can facilitate updates of PM schedules when interfaced with the automated PM system. Either/Or – Most current automated information systems provide the opportunity to schedule PM’s on the basis of so many miles/hours, so much time expired, or so much fuel consumed. This provides the greatest control over what is happening with the equipment. Environmental conditions – Managers also consider demands made on equipment by use, seasons, and terrain. Service Intervals // Page 11 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
  • 11. Servicing of equipment can be thought of as having progressive stages or levels. There are three levels commonly identified, but it is possible to add more levels to accommodate various circumstances and types of equipment. •“A” Level Service or Level One Service – Systematic inspection of the unit (including exterior, hoses, reservoir cleanliness, leaks or wearing of pins and clamps) is often a part of the “A” servicing level. •“B” Level Service or Level Two Service – Service typically includes all the elements of the A service plus inspection of components having a high rate of wear or deterioration or a proven need for frequent adjustment. It includes such things as oil and filter changes, addition of oils and hydraulic fluids, clutch adjustments, brake lining inspection and brake adjustments, engine running condition check, and adjustments to meet manufacturers’ specifications. •“C” Level Service or Level Three Service – Service typically includes all the elements of the A and B inspection plus a thorough check and inspection of all remaining components and assemblies. “C” activities may include additional services such as front end alignments, transmission service, diesel fuel filters, hydraulic filters, engine tune-up, and drive train adjustment, pressure adjustments. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Service Checklists // Page 12
  • 12. The Maintenance managers processes the preventive maintenance schedules for vehicles/equipment. The reports should be generated for preventive maintenance based on odometer readings from fuel uploads and computer system reports or based on time between inspections. Equipment is then scheduled that are due for inspection. The person delivering the vehicle/equipment for preventive maintenance is responsible for notifying the supervisor of their arrival. If there is any additional work they want to have done on the vehicle during the inspection. The shop supervisor can make arrangements if a special need arises to deviate from the preventative maintenance schedule. The repair division should be flexible when it comes to scheduling the PM’s needed. Often the PM arises at a time when the Equipment can not be taken out of service. In conjunction with the manufacturer recommended intervals, the Equipment Maintenance Section can developed preventive maintenance intervals. These interval schedules may change due to equipment availability and repair trends on units. // Page 13 So What Next? PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE
  • 13. // Page 14 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Not all equipment will need the same check list, supplied here is just one example of what could be used. Each Company would need to derive the form that would suit their needs.
  • 14. // Page 15 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Safety inspections and preventive maintenance of vehicles is the key to a good equipment maintenance operation. Each (PM) is completed as per guidelines set and listed on the checklist for that scheduled PM. Safety is a key and an important part of our organization. Therefore, safety sensitive items and equipment are inspected and/or repaired on each and every PM checklist. •The basic PM is an A-PM which checks the equipment from front to rear and interior to exterior, all lights and all fluid levels. •The B-PM includes all the items listed on the A-PM checklist. It also may include changing oil, oil sampling, oil filters and brake adjustments. •The C-PM includes all the items listed on the A-PM and the B-PM checklist. It includes changing air, power steering and transmissions filters. It also includes engine oil, differential, hydraulic oil and transmission fluid change, coolant filter change, air dryer cartridge replacement and battery post and cable cleaning as well as any other suggested manufacture changes or adjustments. Due to the variety of equipment, there may be additional items included on either an A, B, or C PM. Each PM sheet is exclusive to the type of equipment being serviced. Inspections and preventive maintenance invariably leads to repairs and/or replacement. The work associated with these repairs are accounted for and tracked separately from the inspections and PM’s. The inspection and preventive maintenance forms should be developed for light equipment and the various types of heavy equipment. Preventive Maintenance Forms
  • 15. // Page 16 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE All maintenance and repair work, including quick fixes, are issued a Repair Order or a Work Order. Computer generated or hand written repair orders can be issued one of two ways; when an operator brings equipment into a repair location or when a repair is noted during a PM. The repair order shows a work order number which is used to reference all activity involved with each repair such as parts ordered, labor charged and a description of the work that is done. It also shows all charges for outside services to the vehicle. The Repair Supervisors should review the completed repair orders on a daily basis to ensure all information is correct. Repair Orders and Pre-Trip Inspections
  • 16. // Page 17 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Another way to identify equipment repairs needed is through the Pre- Trip Inspection Form or a Pre-Operation Inspection Form (sample attached). Operators fill out this form each time they use a piece of equipment. Any damage or items requiring attention are noted at the time of the inspection. That information is recorded and at the end of the shift is turned into the repairs section to be repaired. Repair Orders and Pre-Trip Inspections
  • 17. // Page 18 PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE Conclusion By implementing a PM Program effectively, real time savings and reductions of equipment costs will be realized. The initial costs of getting started can be minimalized by developing a scheduled inventory of filters, oils, grease and other components needed for your PM’s. When ordered a scheduled and the replenished as required, the costs will not be quite as high. Once a PM Program is put into place it has often been found that maintenance costs rise because of damaged parts not reported. Systematic repairs and qualified reporting has shown a marked reduction in overall costs based on how aggressive of a maintenance approach that been initiated. Your equipment is what makes your Company unique and causes Customers to keep coming back. It is important that you can provide for them what they need when they need it. That will only happen if your equipment is in top working order. A quality Preventive Maintenance Program will help.
  • 18. If you’re interested in improving your mechanics knowledge, getting help with your PM service or would like more information on possible Training in your area contact our office today. CALL-TO-ACTION www.htahydraulics.com 866-432-9771 Hydraulic Training Associates, llc. PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE

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