NAT SCI 211 - CHEMISTRY Engr. Jose Felimar B. Valenzuela Instructor, DBC
COURSE INFORMATION Course Code: NAT SCI 211 Credit Units: 3 units No. of Hours: 3 hours per week
 Instructor: Engr. Jose Felimar B. Valenzuela Email address: jfbvalenzuela@yahoo.com Students are stro...
COURSE DESCRIPTION This is an introductory course that focuses on thefundamental principles of chemistry and the imp...
2. Health Applications of Chemistry: explains, in ageneral manner, the input of chemistry in the healthsciences, ranging f...
COURSE OBJECTIVES - To introduce students to the fundamental principles of chemistry - To establish relations between l...
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Students who complete this course will be able to: Know and define the basic principles of...
 - Describe the chemical basis of energy production, including some renewable sources - Analyze the impact of hum...
VALUES FORMATION Logical thinking Analytical thinking Diligence Patience Problem solving
COURSE OUTLINE Week 1 : Introduction , Chapter 1: Chemistry in the Sciences Week 2 : Chapter 2: Historic Perspective...
 Week 10 : Topic 1: Biochemistry ; Chapter 16: Chemistry and Food Week 11 : Topic 2: Chemistry, Drugs and the Pharma...
COURSE REQUIREMENTS Lecture  Long Exams (Prelims, Midterms, Final)  Quizzes  Assignments  Class Partici...
GRADING SYSTEM 65% Class Standing Quizzes – 15% Participation/ Perform...
CONVERSION TABLE FOR THE FINAL GRADE RAW SCORE FINAL GRADE 96.01 – 100.00 1.00 Outstanding ...
COURSE POLICIES Attendance:  Late – the student arrives 5 minutes after the scheduled class period.  3 tard...
REFERENCES Lemkin, William Ph.D. “Graphic Survey of Chemistry.” Revised and enlarged edition. Oxford Book Company, I...
 Course curriculum adapted from the course CHEM 100 – Chemistry and Society of University of Hawai’i Manoa, under...
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NAT SCI 211 course sylabus

The course syllabus of NATSCI 211 - Chemistry course in Don Bosco College Canlubang, under Engr. Jose Felimar Valenzuela
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NAT SCI 211 course sylabus

  • 1. NAT SCI 211 - CHEMISTRY Engr. Jose Felimar B. Valenzuela Instructor, DBC
  • 2. COURSE INFORMATION Course Code: NAT SCI 211 Credit Units: 3 units No. of Hours: 3 hours per week
  • 3.  Instructor: Engr. Jose Felimar B. Valenzuela Email address: jfbvalenzuela@yahoo.com Students are strongly encouraged to meet with the instructor for questions, additional information or any other related matter. Office hours are WTh, 10:30am – 12:00nn, no appointment required. Any other time can be scheduled by appointment (request by email or in class).
  • 4. COURSE DESCRIPTION This is an introductory course that focuses on thefundamental principles of chemistry and the impact ofchemistry in society. It is intended for non-science majorsthat might not have a background in chemistry. There arethree units in this course: 1. Fundamental Principles of Chemistry: introducesstudents to the building blocks of matter, chemicalbonding, principles of reactivity, intermolecular forces,solutions, thermodynamics and kinetics, as well as thebasics of nuclear, organic and biochemistry
  • 5. 2. Health Applications of Chemistry: explains, in ageneral manner, the input of chemistry in the healthsciences, ranging from the process to develop a new drugand the mechanisms of action in the body, to chemistry inthe food industry and the molecular basis of exercise 3. Societal Applications of Chemistry: the relationbetween chemistry and other sciences or areas of societywill also be discussed, like energy production, the impactof human activity on the environment, forensic science tostudy a crime scene or the chemistry behind painting awork of art.
  • 6. COURSE OBJECTIVES - To introduce students to the fundamental principles of chemistry - To establish relations between learned concepts and a series of topics on health and society - To promote an understanding of the importance of chemistry in many aspects of every day life and the implications in other fields and sciences, from the arts to environmental science - To provide the student a scientific basis to help him/her developing a critical, educated analysis of major societal matters.
  • 7. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Students who complete this course will be able to: Know and define the basic principles of chemistry Formulate basic chemical equations and perform calculations with quantitative material Relate those concepts to other sciences and aspects of everyday life Recognize and value the impact of chemistry in our society Distinguish between the different areas of chemistry and their applications
  • 8.  - Describe the chemical basis of energy production, including some renewable sources - Analyze the impact of human activity on the environment and discuss some possible ways of remediation - Summarize the processes for drug discovery and development in pharmaceutical companies - Explain the mechanisms of action of medicinal compounds that have a profound impact on society, from medicinal drugs to “recreational” drugs - Explain the basis of cutting-age biochemical topics (cloning, genetic engineering, etc) and discuss their implications)
  • 9. VALUES FORMATION Logical thinking Analytical thinking Diligence Patience Problem solving
  • 10. COURSE OUTLINE Week 1 : Introduction , Chapter 1: Chemistry in the Sciences Week 2 : Chapter 2: Historic Perspective Week 3 : Chapter 3: Atomic Structure ; Chapter 4: Nuclear Chemistry Week 4 : Chapter 4: Nuclear Chemistry ; Chapter 5: Chemical Bonds Week 5 : Chapter 6: Mass and volume Relationships Test 1 (Chapters 1-6) Week 6 : Chapter 7: Acids and Bases ; Chapter 8: Oxidation and Reduction Week 7 : Chapter 8: Oxidation and Reduction ; Chapter 9: Introduction to Organic Chemistry Week 8 : Chapter 10: Polymers ; Chapter 11: Metals and Minerals Week 9 : Chapter 11: Metals and Minerals ; Topic 1: Biochemistry Test 2 (Chapters 7-11)
  • 11.  Week 10 : Topic 1: Biochemistry ; Chapter 16: Chemistry and Food Week 11 : Topic 2: Chemistry, Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Industry Week 12 : Chapter 20: Chemistry and Toxicology Test 3 (Topics 1, 2 and Chapters 16, 20) Week 13 : Topic 3: Chemistry and Art ; Topic 4: Chemistry and Forensic Science Week 14 : Topic 4: Chemistry and Forensic Science; Topic 5: Chemistry and the Environment Week 15 : Topic 5: Chemistry and the Environment ; Topic 6: Chemistry and Energy Week 16 : Topic 6: Chemistry and Energy Week 17 FINAL TEST (Topics 3, 4, 5, 6)
  • 12. COURSE REQUIREMENTS Lecture  Long Exams (Prelims, Midterms, Final)  Quizzes  Assignments  Class Participation  Group Report Laboratory  Laboratory Report  Practical Exam  Quizzes  Performance
  • 13. GRADING SYSTEM 65% Class Standing Quizzes – 15% Participation/ Performance (Lab & Lec)– 15% Project / Group Presentation – 10% Assignment/Seatwork– 10% Attendance / Behavior – 10% Lab Report - 5% 35% Major Exams Prelims – 10% Midterms – 10% Finals – 10% Practical Exam (Lab) 5%
  • 14. CONVERSION TABLE FOR THE FINAL GRADE RAW SCORE FINAL GRADE 96.01 – 100.00 1.00 Outstanding 91.51 – 96.00 1.25 87.01 – 91.50 1.50 82.51 – 87.00 1.75 78.01 – 82.50 2.00 Above Average 73.51 – 78.00 2.25 69.01 – 73.50 2.50 Satisfactory 64.51 – 69.00 2.75 60.00 – 64.50 3.00 Passing 58.00 – 59.99 4.00 Conditional LESS THAN 58 5.00 Failure
  • 15. COURSE POLICIES Attendance:  Late – the student arrives 5 minutes after the scheduled class period.  3 tardy marks = 1 absence  Anyone who comes in after 23 minutes is considered absent.  The maximum number of hours of absences is 11 hours (for a 3-unit course). Above this, the student gets a failing grade and earns no credit for the subject.  If a student incurs 50% of the tolerated number of absences will be issued his/her 1st written warning by the OSA. Dropping of Subjects:  Should have endorsement of the subject teacher.  Should be done within a week after Midterm Exam.
  • 16. REFERENCES Lemkin, William Ph.D. “Graphic Survey of Chemistry.” Revised and enlarged edition. Oxford Book Company, Inc. 1971. Mortimer, Charles E. “Chemistry.” Sixth edition. Wadsworth Publishing Company. 1986. Sienko, Michell J. & Plane, Robert A. “Chemistry.” McGraw Hill Book Company. 1976. Silberberg, Martin S. “Principles of General Chemistry.” International Edition. McGraw Hill. 2007.
  • 17.  Course curriculum adapted from the course CHEM 100 – Chemistry and Society of University of Hawai’i Manoa, under Dr. Oscar Navarro, PhD. Permission granted by the author.