THIMUN QATAR MUNITY Press Team
FINDING A STORYJournalism isn’t fiction writing – you can’t createstories from your imagination. You have to findnewsworth...
FINDING A STORY• The Georgia Rambler - Charles Salter of the Atlanta Journal (1970’s) got in his car, headed out to sma...
Finding Fresh Ideas• READ BACK-ISSUES OF YOUR NEWSPAPER ...
Finding Fresh Ideas• LOOK AT MESSAGE BOARDS IN THE HALL AND DISCUSSION FORUMS ONLINE See what people are talking about, ...
Finding Fresh Ideas• BE A GOOD LISTENER Even if it means eavesdropping on conversations in various forums,in the ca...
Finding Fresh Ideas• SET UP INFORMAL FOCUS GROUPS - Get your friends, classmates and fellow conference goers together...
Finding Fresh Ideas• READ EVERYTHING YOU CAN! - Newspapers, magazines and journals - Websites: www.pressdispla...
Finding Fresh Ideas• READ EVERYTHING YOU CAN!
Finding Fresh Ideas• OPEN YOUR EYES, NOT JUST YOUR EARS - See new things in your environment? - See everyone around you ...
Finding Fresh Ideas• ESTABLISH GOOD SOURCES - Create a good working relationship with people who can help you, such as ...
REPORTING ON THE STORY YOU FIND • “Great questions make great reporting” Diane Sawyer - where do those questions come ...
RESEARCH• Like a family tree, the story has a birthplace (born) and will branch out from that (re) source. Your ideas wil...
RESEARCH Decreasing the homework load at John Burroughs School? ...
RESEARCH• Knowing as much factual information as you can about each of the branches of your tree will increase your cred...
INTERVIEWING• RESEARCH - Go into your interview knowing a lot of information about your subject
THE INTERVIEW• OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS -  In journalism, stories are all about people and how they are affected by events....
THE INTERVIEW• OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS “What color shirt are you wearing?” vs. “That’s an interesting colored shirt you’re ...
THE INTERVIEW• ASKING THE RIGHT QUESITONS Stay curious and don’t become the story or an insider to the story. If you s...
THE INTERVIEW• THE ART OF LISTENING - Bob Dotson, NBC News Reporter“ Answers to your questions come in “3’s”. First the...
THE INTERVIEW• THE ART OF LISTENING - For the BIG interview, bring a recorder or anotherperson to transcribe what the in...
THE INTERVIEW• THE ART OF LISTENING - “I never learned anything when I was talking” - Bite your tongue and try not to ...
THE INTERVIEW• Introduce yourself and be a gracious host, show respect for the source.• Break the ice by finding commonal...
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Press workshop101a

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Press workshop101a

  • 1. THIMUN QATAR MUNITY Press Team
  • 2. FINDING A STORYJournalism isn’t fiction writing – you can’t createstories from your imagination. You have to findnewsworthy topics to write about.Similar to writing a research paper, if you have achance to pick your topic, choose one that you arepassionate about, interested in, or have someexperience with. It typically ends up making yourwriting more interesting, personal and fun.The reverse can certainly be argued, that if you have atopic you know nothing about, you can educate andperhaps entertain yourself to a level of curiosity thatleads to great reporting.
  • 3. FINDING A STORY• The Georgia Rambler - Charles Salter of the Atlanta Journal (1970’s) got in his car, headed out to small towns and would ask around until he found a story. He was in search of the most offbeat characters to appear in his column. His stories are as eclectic and extraordinary as the people he interviewed. From tall tales of the Okefenokee Swamp to treasure hunters of Duluth and ex- moonshiners of North Georgia. He even discovered the alleged original recipe of Coca-Cola in the pages of an old pharmacist’s book. All this as a result of getting out of his chair and talking to people!• Coffee House Newsroom
  • 4. Finding Fresh Ideas• READ BACK-ISSUES OF YOUR NEWSPAPER - Redo stories or follow up on stories of interest - Relate the stories to your own experiences 2 www.munity-online.net Monday, 22 January 2007Monday, 22 January 2007 www.munity-online.net Volume 15, Pre-Conference Issue 2007 MUNITY STAFF POWER OF EDUCATIONTHIMUN 2007 Deals With Poverty many to be the heart of the conference, some delegates may By Kat Chen Over 121 million children worldwide cannot go to school. Some have to work to help their families get by, By Jared Staha find themselves more involved with it than others. Such Poverty. It is everywhere, and others cannot afford to pay school delegates may include those in the Economic and Social effecting nearly three billion people. The fees. In Tanzania, school costs were Year after year, the primary objective of the THIMUN Council (ECOSOC) and Special Conference, committees statistics are sobering: half of the global introduced as part of the World Bank’sfoundation remains clear and unchanged, and that is to provide whose themes are centered primarily on the same MDGs. population suffers from abject poverty, a Structural Adjustment Program. Thisan organized forum in which the leaders of tomorrow may Delegates from other committees will not be left condition that kills eleven million children program, meant to alleviate poverty,debate the topics being discussed by the leaders of today. Seeing totally isolated from the conference theme, although they under the age of five each year and denies has conversely caused a drop in primarythat most of these ‘hot-button’ issues are subject to change, may debate it in less detail. Various other activities have food to 790 million people. People spend school enrollment. Over fifty percentevery year, the THIMUN undoubtedly been in the works Co-Editors more money throughout the world on pet of the world’s one billion illiteratesBoard of Directors selects one to get the average delegate moreof particular interest to be the involved with this year’s theme. Elisa Essner food every year, than on fighting poverty. are women, because poor girls are lesscentral theme of the conference. More information about such Kate O’Connor The facts are not difficult to find, but likely to receive adequate education because many of the extreme cases of due to gender biases as well as costs.This theme represents a activities will be announced Text Editors poverty seem so far from our everyday The benefits of an education forcurrent global struggle, and as the conference unfolds. Katherine Chen lives, it is difficult to create in people children living in poverty are not limitedis chosen based on its overall The conference themeinternational relevance and itself means nothing delegates Jared Staha the necessary urgency to incite change. to being able to read and add. Education isinfluence. Hence, no matter understand and appreciate its Reporters The reduction and eventual a key tool in wealth creation. One currentwhat the topic, it is normally significance. So what do students eradication of poverty is a high priority method incorporates the economic Anna Andreeva for the United Nations, listed as the first activities of a community into a school’sone that works in tandem with really think about this year’smany of the issues debated theme? “I believe that this is Carolina Baez Millennium Development Goal (MDG) to curriculum; if a village is known for ain the individual committees. an excellent theme considering Aida Curtis be completed by 2015. Current work in the particular skill, such as carpet-weaving, To set the tone for the current situation in Africa Emilie Dack field of poverty reduction is being carried that skill would be taught in schoolthis year’s conference the and other lesser developed Anna Dallas out by numerous non-governmental alongside with core subjects such asBoard has chosen the theme of nations and around the world,” organizations (NGOs), missionary groups, arithmetic. This creates opportunities for“Eradication of extreme poverty says delegate Mathias Gelb Mallori Hamilton and UN-related bodies such as the United future employment, brings money intoand hunger.” They have chosen of the International School of Alp Kadioglu Nations Development Program (UNDP), the community, and allows educationto keep using the Millennium Panama. “There are a lot of Nazli Koca UNICEF and the World Bank. The work and economics to coexist. Some schoolsDevelopment Goals as a basis problems in this world; however Vicram Mehta has yielded some positive results, such as offer night classes for children whofor the conference themes, a none are as devastating as Caroline Mohpattern started in THIMUN poverty and hunger, and one Charlotte Ryan The best method of helping2006 with the theme “Promotion of the best ways to attackof gender equality.” THIMUN them is through awareness.” Sucheta Shone2007 Secretary General Hälsig shares a similar Sara Siguion-ReynaThomas Hälsig believes thatthis pattern will most likely view, stating that, “this year’s THIMUN ARCHIVES theme is the strongest we have Layout future generations escape poverty:continue in future conferences. General Debate Begins. had so far, since it clearly affects Ross Degenhardt“As for the last two years the THIMUN themes are similarto some of the MDGs, and as far as I have information they so many people and is a solution for so many world issues.” Only time will tell what affect this year’s Michael Eisenstein Chris Hayes EDUCATION.will continue this pattern, since the MDGs resemble most theme has on THIMUN 2007 and how it might makeof the world problems in short definition and achievements.” this conference different from previous years; but with Rayka Kumru Beatriz Narbon increases in adult literacy rates, but there must work during the day. Other schools Though the annual theme may be considered by expectations running high, the prospects look promising. is still much work to be done. Falling are trying to eliminate school fees, Inara Oztekin poverty rates in some areas may be hoping to bring scores of children back Yuko Shen Welcome To THIMUN 2007! attributed to economic booms in only a into the classroom, using methods like Kevin Shortall few countries, yet there are entire regions micro-financing to replace lost revenue. Photography with shrinking domestic income rates. Former Secretary-General Kofi Many people think that poverty Annan said, “Universal primary education Won Choi Hae is simply a part of people’s lives, and is central to the fight against poverty.” Graeme Davey that the complete eradication of poverty A good primary school education Madeline Duhon is far too idealistic. This view, though can help children escape the vicious cycle Emily Kim pessimistic, is understandable. To solve of poverty, and improve their physical Gabrielle Krayenbuhl the global poverty problem, billions of and emotional well-being. Educated people must be given access to basic children will grow into the generations Artwork human needs, including healthcare, clean that will change the world so that one Ryan Botts water, food, and shelter. Missing from this day the word ‘poverty’ will disappear Elizabeth Stanton list, however, is one very important factor, from our global lexicon. This must be perhaps the best method of helping future the ultimate goal of this year’s THIMUN generations escape poverty: education. conference, influencing every debate.
  • 5. Finding Fresh Ideas• LOOK AT MESSAGE BOARDS IN THE HALL AND DISCUSSION FORUMS ONLINE See what people are talking about, advertising and calling attention to
  • 6. Finding Fresh Ideas• BE A GOOD LISTENER Even if it means eavesdropping on conversations in various forums,in the cafeteria, hotels and in general in places where people gather
  • 7. Finding Fresh Ideas• SET UP INFORMAL FOCUS GROUPS - Get your friends, classmates and fellow conference goers togetherand find out what they want to read about. What excites them, frustratesthem and concerns them? - Survey conference goers (students and directors) asking themopen ended or specific questions.
  • 8. Finding Fresh Ideas• READ EVERYTHING YOU CAN! - Newspapers, magazines and journals - Websites: www.pressdisplay.com www.newslink.org/statcamp.html - News radio Radio Qatar ? BBC News? NPR from the U.S.?
  • 9. Finding Fresh Ideas• READ EVERYTHING YOU CAN!
  • 10. Finding Fresh Ideas• OPEN YOUR EYES, NOT JUST YOUR EARS - See new things in your environment? - See everyone around you as a potential news source - Constant observation, sharp eye, eyes and ears on the lookout
  • 11. Finding Fresh Ideas• ESTABLISH GOOD SOURCES - Create a good working relationship with people who can help you, such as the Admin. Staff, the Secretariat, Student Officers, Board Members, Conference Management, MUN Directors
  • 12. REPORTING ON THE STORY YOU FIND • “Great questions make great reporting” Diane Sawyer - where do those questions come from? • “It was while making newspaper deliveries, trying to miss the bushes and hit the porch, that I first learned the importance of accuracy in journalism.”  Charles Osgood - where do you find the facts and how do you know what is true?
  • 13. RESEARCH• Like a family tree, the story has a birthplace (born) and will branch out from that (re) source. Your ideas will continue to grow and develop as your leads take you to new people, places, and ideas.• Allow your mind time to think through all the possible branches of the story tree. Talk with your editors about the shape of the tree to get support for certain branches and suggestions about redirection for others branches.
  • 14. RESEARCH Decreasing the homework load at John Burroughs School? NYT Article Stanford U. The Dalton School Horace Mann The Trinity School John Burroughs SchoolResearch by Denise Pope Adam Gopnik Harris Cooper>3.5hrs homework = health risk Author, parent Neuroscience speaker Student Head of School Parents Teacher Survey Interview Opinions Opinions Stanford Students with Jessica Bagby connection to JBS Head of Tutoring Center Head of NYC Upper School Sam Altman Mr. Albrecht Upper School Cousins Alum, $$$ Alum JBS teacher 90% Stressed Increase in University admissions unhealthy “No way you could drives our kids to behaviors unhealthy behaviors Students come to us play a sport, do all deepen their understanding your homework and of the subject matter, to get more than 6 hours of sleep! I am Washington University learn to manage their load, Sleep and homework and for stress management always tired and study 2011 anticipating a vacation”
  • 15. RESEARCH• Knowing as much factual information as you can about each of the branches of your tree will increase your credibility and lead to good questions to ask - if you are going to interview for a job, you better know something about the person you are talking to and what you are talking about (the company, the school, etc) - people will tend to open up to you if they believe in what you are doing and think you are going to do a good job in your report
  • 16. INTERVIEWING• RESEARCH - Go into your interview knowing a lot of information about your subject
  • 17. THE INTERVIEW• OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS -  In journalism, stories are all about people and how they are affected by events. Audiences want to experience the emotion. Even though modern audiences tend to cringe at the question “How does this make you feel?”, it is very effective. -  Questions beginning with “Why” or “How” and “Tell me about…” are designed to encourage a more meaningful answer drawing from the subjects own experience or feelings. -  Would be nice to prepare some follow up questions!
  • 18. THE INTERVIEW• OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS “What color shirt are you wearing?” vs. “That’s an interesting colored shirt you’re wearing.” “Do you get along well with your teachers?” vs. “Tell me about your relationship with your teachers.” “Do you like your job as Secretary General?” vs. “What do you wish to accomplish in your role as Secretary General?” “Did you take Model UN in the lower school?” vs. “How did you get involved in Model UN?”
  • 19. THE INTERVIEW• ASKING THE RIGHT QUESITONS Stay curious and don’t become the story or an insider to the story. If you stay onthe outside you’ll see it better and know the right questions to ask. If you are on theinside and think you know the answers, you might as well write the story without theinterview. If you think like a first timer to THIMUN and you don’t know how thingswork (but you have done the research), then you will ask more curious questions thatthe readers might think “why didn’t I think of that?”
  • 20. THE INTERVIEW• THE ART OF LISTENING - Bob Dotson, NBC News Reporter“ Answers to your questions come in “3’s”. First the person will answer the questionthe way they think you want to hear it. Then they will, to make sure you understandthe answer, answer it the way they see it, and then, if you wait around long enough,through that awkward silence, they will tell you where the body is buried. It willcome pouring out and you are left with the real meat of the story.”
  • 21. THE INTERVIEW• THE ART OF LISTENING - For the BIG interview, bring a recorder or anotherperson to transcribe what the interviewer is saying soyou can listen to what the person being interviewed issaying and be attentive in order to pick-up on key points(ready to veer off with follow up questions).
  • 22. THE INTERVIEW• THE ART OF LISTENING - “I never learned anything when I was talking” - Bite your tongue and try not to interrupt -
  • 23. THE INTERVIEW• Introduce yourself and be a gracious host, show respect for the source.• Break the ice by finding commonality• Go to the source. Interview where they will feel comfortable. Allows you to see them in their environment.• Last question: “Is there anything you would like to add?”

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