Political and Military
Ancient Mayan Civilization
By Joselyn Treyes
11th Grade
IAA
Political Organization
-
City states united in a loose confederacy.

Ruled by powerful semi-divine kings called Halach...
Political Heritage

In both the priesthood and the ruling class, nepotism was
apparently the prevailing system under whi...
The Mayan Military
 Wars and major raids were led by the Ahau, or King.
 Members of the highest ruling class often were
...
Military Organization

Mayan Kingdoms

fought constantly with each other

warriors won tremendous prestige by capt...
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Political and Military (Ancient Mayan Civilization)

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      Technology      
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Transcripts - Political and Military (Ancient Mayan Civilization)

  • 1. Political and Military Ancient Mayan Civilization By Joselyn Treyes 11th Grade IAA
  • 2. Political Organization - City states united in a loose confederacy.  Ruled by powerful semi-divine kings called Halach Uinic: Highest authority in Maya city center  Chiefs and Priests: served as advisors to help carry our government functions Lord ruled for life; considered god-king Succeeded by son or other close male relative  Nobles: are own most of the land and are the important merchants (Chiefs, priests, lesser govern officials Ruled over village hamlets (outside city center) Gathered taxes, supplies, organized large building projects, led peasant armies.  Priests: Led ritual practices – including sacrifice and offerings. Maintained an elaborate calendar and transmitted knowledge of writing, astronomy , and mathematics.  Population largely rural used cities for primarily religious center
  • 3. Political Heritage  In both the priesthood and the ruling class, nepotism was apparently the prevailing system under which new members were chosen.  Primogeniture was the form under which new kings were chosen as the king passed down his position to his son. After the birth of a heir, the kings performed a blood sacrifice by drawing blood from his own body as an offering to his ancestors.  A human sacrifice was then offered at the time of a new king's installation in office.  To be a king, one must have taken a captive in a war and that person is then used as the victim in his accession ceremony.  This ritual is the most important of a king's life as it is the point at which he inherits the position as head of the lineage and leader of the city. The religious explanation that upheld the institution of kingship asserted that Maya rulers were necessary for continuance of the Universe. http://www.indians.org/welker/maya.htm
  • 4. The Mayan Military  Wars and major raids were led by the Ahau, or King.  Members of the highest ruling class often were military and spiritual leaders of the cities and their capture during battles was a key element of military strategy.  It is believed that many of the cities, especially the larger ones, had large, well-trained armies available for attack and defense.  It is unknown if the Maya had a professional soldier class like the Aztecs did. http://latinamericanhistory.about.com/od/Maya/p/The-Ancient-Maya-War-And-Warfare.htm
  • 5. Military Organization  Mayan Kingdoms  fought constantly with each other  warriors won tremendous prestige by capturing high- ranking enemies.  Captives were usually made slaves humiliated, tortured, and ritually sacrificed.  It has always been believed that the Maya were peaceful intellectuals and retain barely mentioned documents or information that its military organization.  But recently, through archaeological excavations have found that the war had a major role in their culture. Although they were not as aggressive and bloodthirsty as the Aztecs, the Maya had warriors who claimed their power in the area and who plundered other tribes for offerings to their gods. They also had the ball game where warriors and involved human sacrifices.  In terms of its form of warfare, it is known that using padded armor that were painted black to intimidate their enemies.