Natural Gas FactsNatural gas is a combustible gaseous mixture of hydrocarbons, mostly methane. It is best known as the fue...
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Natural gas quickfacts

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
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Transcripts - Natural gas quickfacts

  • 1. Natural Gas FactsNatural gas is a combustible gaseous mixture of hydrocarbons, mostly methane. It is best known as the fuel thatproduces the blue flame that heats our food, our water, and our homes and buildings. It is also usedto generate electricity, provide heat for industrial processes, and as a raw material to produce petrochemicals,plastics, paints, fertilizers, and a wide variety of other products.Natural gas has many uses• It meets 24 percent of U.S. energy demand.• It heats 51 percent of U.S. households. It also cools manyhomes and provides fuel for cooking.Demand for natural gas• Americans used 23.2 trillion cubic feet (tcf) in 2008, up0.85 percent from 2007 (23.0 tcf).• Natural gas supplied about 64.9 million residentialcustomers and 5.5 million commercial and industrial customers in 2007.• Because natural gas burns cleaner than gasoline or diesel, many companies and municipalities are deployingfleets of natural gas-powered cars, trucks and buses to reduce emissions. There are over 120,000 natural gasvehicles operating on American roads.• The current Annual Energy Outlook predicts a dip in demand from 2009 – 2010 until 2023 – 2024, then demandfor natural gas will continue to grow.Natural gas supplies• Almost all of the natural gas used in the United States comes fromNorth America. – Domestic resources produced more than 20.6 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of natural gas delivered to market in 2008. That’s equal to more than 88 percent of U.S. consumption. – After 30 years of essentially flat production, improved technology has contributed to an 8 percent increase in U.S. natural gas production between 2007 and 2008. – Of the natural gas imported for U.S. consumption in 2008, 3.6 tcf arrived by pipeline (mostly from Canada).• Liquefied natural gas (LNG) – natural gas stored at temperatures low enough to change it from vapor to liquidform – makes it economically viable to deliver natural gas by tanker. In 2008, the United States imported 0.4 tcf ofLNG from countries including Trinidad, Egypt, Nigeria and Algeria.www.api.org/aboutoilgas/natgas/

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