<ul><li>Prices in CPE </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The role of money and prices </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Private ...
 
Collective farm market and cooperative trade
Prices of state trade and collective farm market
 
 
 
Profitability of key economic sectors in 1986, %
 
Average monthly wages by industry in 1986, rubles
 
 
Finance, Money, Credit and Banking <ul><li>Financial system </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Government finance </li></ul></ul><...
 
 
 
 
 
 
Savings-investment balance <ul><li>In any economy savings should be equal to investment, that is, incomes not used for c...
 
 
Money supply and national income in current prices, growth rates,1960-85,%
 
 
 
 
 
 
Household savings rate, as a % of personal disposable income
 
 
Credit outstanding to enterprises and households and nominal national income, growth rates,1960-85,%
External Economic Ties <ul><li>Foreign trade mechanism, exchange rate in CPE </li></ul><ul><li>The structure of foreign ...
 
 
Soviet foreign trade turnover, as a % of retail trade turnover and national income in current prices
Exports and foreign trade turnover as a % of national income in constant prices
 
 
 
Ratio of world market prices to domestic prices for selected goods, 1990,%
 
 
Trade flows and trade balances for the republics, 1988, as a percentage of GNP a (Exports+Imports): (2xGNP), at domestic ...
Trade balances of the republics in inter-republican trade by commodity group, 1988, domestic prices, billion rubles a Incl...
Financial flows between republics a Figures in brackets stand for the share of industrial enterprises subordinated to un...
Share of republics in net material product, retail sales, and expenditure of the republican budgets, 1988, % of total a ...
 
Soviet debt and asset position vis-a-vis BIS-area banks in hard currency, billion of dollars at year-ends
Was the Soviet Economy a Planned One? <ul><li>Annual and five year plans </li></ul><ul><li>Long term planning </li></ul><u...
 
 
US money supply and GNP, annual growth rates,%
Enterprises deposits and national income in current prices, annual growth rates,%
Personal bank deposits and retail sales in current prices, annual growth rates,%
Money supply and wages, annual growth rates,%
How the increase in money supply leads to the increase in prices and output in the CPE
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Prices, labor market..

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  • 1. <ul><li>Prices in CPE </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The role of money and prices </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Private (individual) sector, collective farm market and cooperative trade </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Consumer goods market </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Black market </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprises' incentive funds </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prices and “normatives” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Labor market and wages </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Labor force, employment, unemployment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Wages </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Income distribution </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Finance, money, credit and banking </li></ul><ul><li>External economic ties </li></ul><ul><li>Was CPE a planned one? </li></ul>Prices, Labor Market, Finance, Credit, External Economic Relations in CPE. Was Soviet Economy a Planned One?
  • 3. Collective farm market and cooperative trade
  • 4. Prices of state trade and collective farm market
  • 8. Profitability of key economic sectors in 1986, %
  • 10. Average monthly wages by industry in 1986, rubles
  • 13. Finance, Money, Credit and Banking <ul><li>Financial system </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Government finance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Enterprises’ finance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Households’ finance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Saving-investment balance </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Monetary circulation </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>components of money supply - monetary aggregates </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>monetary policy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Banking and credit </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Bank credit </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Financial assets and debts of enterprises </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Financial assets and debts of households </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Government debt </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Total credit and indebtedness </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 20. Savings-investment balance <ul><li>In any economy savings should be equal to investment, that is, incomes not used for current consumption are finally used to finance investment in real (tangible) assets, government budget deficit and outflow of capital abroad. </li></ul><ul><li>Sp + Sb +G = I + CA, where </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sp - personal (households) savings </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sb - business savings (depreciation and undistributed profit) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>G - government savings (budget surplus), or dissavings (deficit) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I - gross investment in the economy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>CA - current account surplus (net export of capital abroad) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The economic meaning of the equality is that total savings of the private (non-government) sector (households and companies), should be suffice to finance investment, government budget deficit, net exports of capital abroad and build up of FOREX. Or, to put it differently, investment may be financed only through personal and business savings, government budget surplus and the inflow of capital from abroad (decrease in FOREX). </li></ul><ul><li>The U.S. savings-investment balance in the 1980s and in 2000-06 was characterized by a low personal and business savings rate, and large government dissavings (budget deficit), that absorbed at one point nearly all net savings generated by private sector, so that net investment were financed mostly by the inflow of capital from abroad. </li></ul>
  • 23. Money supply and national income in current prices, growth rates,1960-85,%
  • 30. Household savings rate, as a % of personal disposable income
  • 33. Credit outstanding to enterprises and households and nominal national income, growth rates,1960-85,%
  • 34. External Economic Ties <ul><li>Foreign trade mechanism, exchange rate in CPE </li></ul><ul><li>The structure of foreign trade </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Commodity structure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Comparative advantages </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Geographical structure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Comecon trade </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Non-trade external relations </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Foreign direct investment </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Soviet assistance to developing and socialist countries </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Foreign workers in the Soviet Union </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Balance of payments </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>International investment position </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 37. Soviet foreign trade turnover, as a % of retail trade turnover and national income in current prices
  • 38. Exports and foreign trade turnover as a % of national income in constant prices
  • 42. Ratio of world market prices to domestic prices for selected goods, 1990,%
  • 45. Trade flows and trade balances for the republics, 1988, as a percentage of GNP a (Exports+Imports): (2xGNP), at domestic prices, assuming the same GNP/NMP ratios for the republics as for the USSR as a whole. Domestic trade is trade with the rest of the Union. Foreign trade is trade with the rest of the world. b Estimates of the balance of tourist trade are shown in brackets. Source: Stabilization, Liberalization and Devolution: Assessment of the Economic Situation and Reform Process in the Soviet Union. A Report, prepared by Commission of the European Communities. December 1990, p. 173. (Data is derived from official Soviet statistics); Narodnoye Khozyaistvo SSSR v 1989 godu (National Economy of the USSR in 1989). Moscow, 1990, p. 638.
  • 46. Trade balances of the republics in inter-republican trade by commodity group, 1988, domestic prices, billion rubles a Includes other commodities. Source: Vestnik Statistiky , 1990, N3.
  • 47. Financial flows between republics a Figures in brackets stand for the share of industrial enterprises subordinated to union-republican and republican ministries in total industrial output. b 7.8% of total credit was not broken down by republic. Source: A Study of the Soviet Economy. IMF, World Bank, OECD, EBRD. 1991, Vol. 1, p. 129, 279; Narodnoye Khozyaistvo SSSR v 1989 godu (National Economy of the USSR in 1989). Moscow, 1990, p. 17, 628; Stabilization, Liberalization and Devolution: Assessment of the Economic Situation and Reform Process in the Soviet Union. EC, December 1990, p. 171.
  • 48. Share of republics in net material product, retail sales, and expenditure of the republican budgets, 1988, % of total a Plan for 1988. Source: Narodnoye Khozyaistvo SSSR v 1989 godu (National Economy of the USSR in 1989). Moscow, 1990, p. 101; Stabilization, Liberalization and Devolution: Assessment of the Economic Situation and Reform Process in the Soviet Union. EC, December 1990, p. 171; Izvestiya, October 21, 1987.
  • 50. Soviet debt and asset position vis-a-vis BIS-area banks in hard currency, billion of dollars at year-ends
  • 51. Was the Soviet Economy a Planned One? <ul><li>Annual and five year plans </li></ul><ul><li>Long term planning </li></ul><ul><li>Why in a market economy increase in the money supply leads to the growth of output (short-term) and/or prices (long-term) </li></ul><ul><li>Planned anarchy - How the increase in money supply leads to the increase in prices and output in the CPE </li></ul>
  • 54. US money supply and GNP, annual growth rates,%
  • 55. Enterprises deposits and national income in current prices, annual growth rates,%
  • 56. Personal bank deposits and retail sales in current prices, annual growth rates,%
  • 57. Money supply and wages, annual growth rates,%
  • 58. How the increase in money supply leads to the increase in prices and output in the CPE

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