La Haine
Jonathan Skewes, Elizabeth DeBerardinis,
Beate Aguayo, and Kathy Ma
In the opening scene, there are a lot of people running around, going from
store to store to break things, breaking publi...
According to the author of one blog, Cinéma Engagé is
designed to give unjust systems, like the police in La Haine, a
ba...
The director of La Haine, Mathieu Kassovitz, put the movie in black and
white for many reasons. It was originally shot in...
Two of the three main characters didn’t have true
hatred for the police, and one of them, Hubert, said
that they were th...
There still are racial tensions and conflicts that characterize French society
today. One article that I found that talke...
Vinz
• Jewish
• Wants revenge on police
• Represents the upset
people in the banlieues
Hubert
• Afro-French
• Boxer
• Mature
• Pro police, but once he is a victim
of police brutality, his views of
the po...
Saïd
• Represents the North
African, Muslim population
• Young
• Sidekick
• Gets the group in trouble
with a wealthy...
• According to Erin Schroeder, the banlieues are a predominantly working-class
industrial suburb of Paris. These working-...
• The movie utilizes the expression “a zoo you visit in your car” in reference to the
banlieues. This expression is used ...
• La Haine portrays the banlieues as an area of dilapidated apartment buildings with
graffiti on almost every wall. Youth...
The final scene was inevitable. At the end, there was a man driving a car and
approaching the three main characters. He h...
Sources
• Cartelli, Phillip. "La Haine (1995) France." Rev. of Film. Film International 2008: 62-64. Print.
• Chapman, A...
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La Haine

This is a film about three young male adults growing up in the ghetto. One is Muslim, one is Jewish, and the other is black. This film shows the struggles of growing up in poverty in Paris and the large economic gap between the rich and poor, which has always been a problem in Paris.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - La Haine

  • 1. La Haine Jonathan Skewes, Elizabeth DeBerardinis, Beate Aguayo, and Kathy Ma
  • 2. In the opening scene, there are a lot of people running around, going from store to store to break things, breaking public property, some try to fight another, there were things burning on the street. There were many police try to stop them, and got injured. The music played in the opening scene was Burnin’ and Lootin by Bob Marley, and the song sends the message that people need to stands up for their rights. The government was taking advantage of the poor, and only helping the rich The introduction music remind me of some events in French history, where lower class people did not get treated fairly, there were farmers who work at the farm but did not get to own the land. They always have to pay taxes and rent.
  • 3. According to the author of one blog, Cinéma Engagé is designed to give unjust systems, like the police in La Haine, a bad name. Fiomakers choose this type of work to defend minorities. An example of this is how the public were amazed to see what life was like in les banlieues. They saw how violent the police acted towards the people. The movie caused a lot of talk as well because of its controversial subject matter and how the police were represented as violent and racist. (Article cited written by Charlotte Harel, Helena Rodriguez, and Margaux Le Roy)
  • 4. The director of La Haine, Mathieu Kassovitz, put the movie in black and white for many reasons. It was originally shot in color and then he made it into black and white. I think it really helps to set the mood of the movie to give it a cold harsh feeling, which goes with the violence. The police try to control the people through violence and abuse their power. The use of black and white also expresses the idea of accepting a situation that you are given and having to deal with it. It does this by linking the real footage from the news reports that we watch in the beginning of the movie in the opening credits. Lastly, I think the use of black and white cinematography makes the movie seem like a documentary (Turner) . It makes people feel like they are learning about life in the banlieues. The main feeling that was generated throughout this movie was resentment to the police, and this was also generated by the use of black and white imagery. Black and white are polar opposites, so the director used this to show the stark differences between the citizens of the banlieues and the police.
  • 5. Two of the three main characters didn’t have true hatred for the police, and one of them, Hubert, said that they were they to protect them. However, the two characters who don’t hate the police are victims of police brutality. This changes their views on the police because now they have experienced police brutality.
  • 6. There still are racial tensions and conflicts that characterize French society today. One article that I found that talked about recent police brutality was about how an anti-police protest turned very violent in the city of Rennes. The youth wore masks to protect their identity. Protesters became extremely violent in response to the death of a 21 year old activist Remi Fraisse. He was killed during an explosion that occurred when brutal clashes with police broke out at the site of contested-dam project in southwestern France. The protesters reacted by hurling flairs at police and even flipping cars over. The police fired tear gas at the protesters. This riot also put pressure on the government. This article is just one example of how conflicts with police still occur in French Society today. We can also see strong ties from this article to the movie La Haine, because we see how poorly the police treat their people in the riots . http://rt.com/news/201179-france-activist-death-clashes/
  • 7. Vinz • Jewish • Wants revenge on police • Represents the upset people in the banlieues
  • 8. Hubert • Afro-French • Boxer • Mature • Pro police, but once he is a victim of police brutality, his views of the police change • Believes that as long as the youth disrespect the police, the police will disrespect the youth
  • 9. Saïd • Represents the North African, Muslim population • Young • Sidekick • Gets the group in trouble with a wealthy guy in downtown Paris
  • 10. • According to Erin Schroeder, the banlieues are a predominantly working-class industrial suburb of Paris. These working-class industrial suburbs are made up of numerous immigrant cultures which create an incredibly diverse population as well as various national problems. As we saw in La Haine, each of the three main characters has significantly different cultural backgrounds which causes them to have different views regarding the situation with the police. While the three boys have differing views on how to deal with the police because of what happened to Abdel, the three all seem to have a consensus regarding their disposition towards authority figures. There is an obvious lack of respect between the youth and the police in these industrial suburbs. As Schroeder says, “In the contemporary context, unemployment is high, housing is crumbling, and periodic bursts of youth protest lead the national government to prescribe an almost permanent riot police presence in the most explosive or "hot" neighborhoods (les quartiers chauds)”.
  • 11. • The movie utilizes the expression “a zoo you visit in your car” in reference to the banlieues. This expression is used to illustrate the way which these working-class suburbs are almost completely cut off from any association or connection with central Paris. Because the banlieues are so effectively cut off from the outside world, they are somewhat enclosed in their own world and as a result have created walls which separate this world from the rest of Paris. This separation has allowed the rest of Paris look at the banlieues and the people that live there as one would look at animals in a zoo. These working-class suburbs are merely a spectacle for the rest of Paris to gawk at when driving by. Amy Siciliano, from the University of Toronto describes how the camera positioning in La Haine contributes to the overall illustration of how the rest of Paris views people from the banlieues, “We observe the youths’ hostile interactions with the crew; their relative position to them in a playground below ground level; their projected image, which oscillates between the view of the La Haine: Framing the ‘Urban Outcasts’ 224 cinematographer and the cameraman; and ultimately how the youth themselves are acutely aware of their ‘safari-like’ appearance” (Siciliano, Amy).
  • 12. • La Haine portrays the banlieues as an area of dilapidated apartment buildings with graffiti on almost every wall. Youth cover the streets as the majority of them are outside playing, walking, meeting friends, selling and buying drugs, etc. The youth which fill the streets of the banlieues are clearly not children of wealth. Most of them are wearing simple clothing that looks worn out. The jungle gyms which we see Vinz, Hubert, and Said hangout at are not updated, clean or even safe looking. Every single detail of the banlieues is depressing and illustrates the government’s lack of concern for this area of Paris. Adele Chapman, successfully describes the way in which the film depicts the banlieues in an article for Entertainment Scene 360, “The whole estate looks dirty because of the high volume of graffiti on almost everything. There are lots of high rise flats, which house lots of people, but each flat is small. The banlieue looks very small and claustrophobic, almost prison like” (Chapman, Adele).
  • 13. The final scene was inevitable. At the end, there was a man driving a car and approaching the three main characters. He had a light flashing on top of his car, so he could be a policeman, but he was not in uniform. He killed Vinz and wanted to kill another character. Hubert was closing his eyes, which sows he could already see how the scene is going to play out. The best illustration of the relationship between youth and police in the banlieues is this scene. Phillip Cartelli explains this relationship in his review of La Haine by saying, “The shocking eruption of violence that ends the film serves as both a warning, and documentation of the pressures to which those on all sides of banlieue life are subjected”.
  • 14. Sources • Cartelli, Phillip. "La Haine (1995) France." Rev. of Film. Film International 2008: 62-64. Print. • Chapman, Adele. "Movie Analysis the Representation of the Banlieue in La Haine." Entertainment Scene 360. N.p., 18 June 2007. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. http://www.entertainmentscene360.com/index.php/movie-analysis-the-representation-of-the-banlieue-in-la-haine-43462/. • Harel, Charlotte, Helena Rodriguez, and Margaux Le Roy. "Le Cinéma Engagé : TPE 1ES3." Le Cinéma Engagé : TPE 1ES3. N.p., Jan. 2011. Web. 21 Nov. 2014. http://cinema-engage.blogspot.com/. • Morrisey, Jim. Je t’aime—moi non plus; Franco-British cinematic relations. New York: Berghahn Books, 2010. Print. • Schroeder, Erin. “A Multicultural Conversation: La Haine, Raï, and Menace II Society.” Camera Obscura 16.1 (2001): 143-179. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. • Siciliano, Amy. La Haine. Harlow: Longman, 2000. ACME Editorial Collective, 2007. Web. 23 Oct. 2014. http://www.acme-journal. org/vol6/ASi.pdf. • Turner, Pete. "La Haine." STATIC MASS EMPORIUM RSS. METATEMPUS, 30 Nov. 2012. Web. 24 Oct. 2014. http://staticmass.net/deconstructing-cinema/la-haine/. • West, M Joan. “La Haine.” Cinéaste. 33.1 (2007): 76-77. Web 24 Oct. 2014. • Photo of Vinz taken from Dr. Guy Spielmann’s blog titled France: Culture banlieues. He works at Georgetown University. http://faculty.georgetown.edu/spielmag/docs/france/LaHaine.htm. • Photo of Hubert taken from shipintv.com. Article published by Grinchu on July 15, 2013. Article titled Hubert Koundé. http://shpintv.com/hubert-kounde/ • Photo of Saïd taken from an article titled France/Benin/Morocco: Jodie Foster on "La Haine”. Published on September 7, 2009 for bombastic element. http://www.bombasticelement.org/2009/09/francebeninmorocco-jodie-foster-on-la.html • Screenshots of les banlieues, the train, and the police brutality scene all taken from Blu-ray.com. The article was written on May 8, 2012, and it’s titled La Haine Blue-ray. http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/La-Haine-Blu-ray/38677/#Screenshots. • Photo of final scene taken from minineyes’s tumblr blog. Posted three months ago. http://minineyes.tumblr.com