 levision (TV) is a telecommunication medium for transmitting and receiving moving images that can be monochro...
 In its early stages of development, television employed a combination of optical, mechanical and electronic tech...
 The first images transmitted electrically were sent by early mechanical fax machines, including the pan telegrap...
 he idea of using scanning to transmit images was put to actual practical use in 1881 in the pantelegraph, throug...
 Getting TV programming shown to the public can happen in many different ways. After production the next step is to mark...
 Around the globe, broadcast television is financed by either government, advertising, licensing (a form of tax),...
 Televisions broad reach makes it a powerful and attractive medium for advertisers. Many television networks a...
 Since inception in the U.S. in 1940[citation needed], television commercials have become one of the most effecti...
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television http://www.google.com.tr/imghp?hl=tr& tab=wi
Nafiz kaan güldal 2010044
Nafiz kaan güldal 2010044
Nafiz kaan güldal 2010044
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Nafiz kaan güldal 2010044

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      Business      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Nafiz kaan güldal 2010044

  • 1.  levision (TV) is a telecommunication medium for transmitting and receiving moving images that can be monochrome (black-and-white) or colored, with or without accompanying sound. "Television" may also refer specifically to a television set, television programming, or television transmission. The etymology of the word has a mixed Latin and Greek origin, meaning "far sight": Greek tele (τῆλε), far, and Latin visio, sight (from video, vis- to see, or to view in the first person).
  • 2.  In its early stages of development, television employed a combination of optical, mechanical and electronic technologies to capture, transmit and display a visual image. By the late 1920s, however, those employing only optical and electronic technologies were being explored. All modern television systems relied on the latter, although the knowledge gained from the work on electromechanical systems was crucial in the development of fully electronic television.
  • 3.  The first images transmitted electrically were sent by early mechanical fax machines, including the pan telegraph, developed in the late nineteenth century. The concept of electrically powered transmission of television images in motion was first sketched in 1878 as the telephonoscope, shortly after the invention of the telephone. At the time, it was imagined by early science fiction authors, that someday that light could be transmitted over copper wires, as sounds were.
  • 4.  he idea of using scanning to transmit images was put to actual practical use in 1881 in the pantelegraph, through the use of a pendulum-based scanning mechanism. From this period forward, scanning in one form or another has been used in nearly every image transmission technology to date, including television. This is the concept of "rasterization", the process of converting a visual image into a stream of electrical pulses.
  • 5.  Getting TV programming shown to the public can happen in many different ways. After production the next step is to market and deliver the product to whatever markets are open to using it. This typically happens on two levels: Original Run or First Run: a producer creates a program of one or multiple episodes and shows it on a station or network which has either paid for the production itself or to which a license has been granted by the television producers to do the same. Broadcast syndication: this is the terminology rather broadly used to describe secondary programming usages (beyond original run). It includes secondary runs in the country of first issue, but also international usage which may not be managed by the originating producer. In many cases other companies, TV stations or individuals are engaged to do the syndication work, in other words to sell the product into the markets they are allowed to sell into by contract from the copyright holders, in most cases the producers.
  • 6.  Around the globe, broadcast television is financed by either government, advertising, licensing (a form of tax), subscription or any combination of these. To protect revenues, subscription TV channels are usually encrypted to ensure that only subscription payers receive the decryption codes to see the signal. Unencrypted channels are known as free to air or FTA.
  • 7.  Televisions broad reach makes it a powerful and attractive medium for advertisers. Many television networks and stations sell blocks of broadcast time to advertisers ("sponsors") in order to fund their programming
  • 8.  Since inception in the U.S. in 1940[citation needed], television commercials have become one of the most effective, persuasive, and popular methods of selling products of many sorts, especially consumer goods. During the 1940s and into the 1950s, programs were hosted by single advertisers. This, in turn, gave great creative license to the advertisersover the content of the show. Due to[citation needed] the quiz show scandals in the 1950s, networks shifted to the magazine concept introducing advertising breaks with multiple advertisers.
  • 9.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television http://www.google.com.tr/imghp?hl=tr& tab=wi