Presenting health data to patients:
who’s doing what, why, and how well?
Kathleen Gray
20 February 2015
Presenting data: h...
Gimme My Damn Data by e-patient Dave deBronkart
• https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b4li7N_7Ck
Huge patient expectations re:
processing and leveraging of their health data
• Gimme My Damn Data keynote at Medicine 2.0 ...
Local and global power plays are unfolding
Jan
2015
Doctors’ notes viewable by patients
US experience with doctors and patients sharing clinical notes BMJ 2015; 350: g7785 (1...
A public database of diagnostic reports
Al-Ubaydli, M. 2011. Giving patients control of their health records. http://www.slideshare.net/technologyventures/giving-...
PCEHR – still more questions than answers
Pearce, C., & Bainbridge, M. (2014). A personally controlled electronic health r...
Worth the effort? evidence on direct patient access
to lab test results…
Consumers
• Electronic patient portals are a rela...
Patient portals
Viewing laboratory results
= portal function
commonly used by
patients internationally
Most portals provid...
Consumer choice in personal health records
www.myphr.com/resources/choose.aspx
“Microsoft HealthVault is truly a
wonderful...
Personal health data hacking and heroics using:
social media, self-quantification & citizen sensors
13
Why would you?
curiosity, performance, control, healing, socialising
Gimpel, H., Nißen, M., & Görlitz, R. (2013). Quant...
14
Not so niche …
How good are the data?
JAMA 10 February 2015 313(6).
Personal health data analytics and dashboards
Personal health data sharing
New social movements
• The Quantified-Self movement was first developed in
Introduction
Citizen science in health
• Citizens crowdsourcing data sets to explore their own biomedical
research questions
Citizen science
http://povesham.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/citizen-science-as-participatory-science
Citizen science is doing some interesting things to
research models
Extreme sensing
http://theconversation.com/is-googles-project-to-monitor-healthy-people-just-a-bit-creepy-29875
• Google's...
Changing designs of health care and health research
Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsou...
Critique: “The use in research of personal fitness or health data shared on
social network raises both scientific and ethi...
Integrating patient data with clinical data for a
learning healthcare system
JASON, MITRE Corp. November 2014. Data for in...
© Copyright The University of Melbourne 2015
Thank you!
Contacts / enquiries:
health-informatics@unimelb.edu.au
Presenting health data to patients
Presenting health data to patients
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Presenting health data to patients

Invited presentation at Presenting Data: How to Convey Information Most Effectively Seminar, Centre of Research Excellence in Patient Safety, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, February 2015.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Healthcare      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Presenting health data to patients

  • 1. Presenting health data to patients: who’s doing what, why, and how well? Kathleen Gray 20 February 2015 Presenting data: how to convey information most effectively Centre of Research Excellence in Patient Safety School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University
  • 2. Gimme My Damn Data by e-patient Dave deBronkart • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b4li7N_7Ck
  • 3. Huge patient expectations re: processing and leveraging of their health data • Gimme My Damn Data keynote at Medicine 2.0 Congress,Toronto, 2009 • a horror story of bungled medical records on a diagnosis of terminal illness; a happy ending in which our hero demanded better data and saved his own life • started a social movement of networked patients aiming to open up clinical care and clinical research • http://e-patients.net/archives/category/medical-records • http://participatorymedicine.org
  • 4. Local and global power plays are unfolding Jan 2015
  • 5. Doctors’ notes viewable by patients US experience with doctors and patients sharing clinical notes BMJ 2015; 350: g7785 (10 February 2015)
  • 6. A public database of diagnostic reports
  • 7. Al-Ubaydli, M. 2011. Giving patients control of their health records. http://www.slideshare.net/technologyventures/giving-patients-control-of-their-health-records And some issues: – Data creation – confidence in data, caution in interpretation – Data custodianship – who owns it? who cares? – Data curation – maintaining structures, applying standards – Data clouds – from connected information to collective intelligence? Using mainstream tools and services: PPs & PHRs
  • 8. PCEHR – still more questions than answers Pearce, C., & Bainbridge, M. (2014). A personally controlled electronic health record for Australia. JAMIA amiajnl-2013. Ten things: 1. How is it different to what I have now? 2. What information will be included? 3. What is a Shared Health Summary? 4. Who can see my MBS & PBS details? 5. Why can’t I see my Pathology and Diagnostic Imaging reports? 6. How can I see info about my medications prescribed and dispensed? 7. Who can see my contact number and what is it for? 8. Who will see information entered via the Child Development function? 9. Can I remove documents? 10. What happens to the information if I stop using my eHealth record?
  • 9. Worth the effort? evidence on direct patient access to lab test results… Consumers • Electronic patient portals are a relatively new technology and the healthcare community has only just begun to engage with this innovation to optimise care delivery, outcomes and patient engagement. • There are major obstacles which hinder the involvement of consumers. These include a lack of access to clinical information and a lack of appropriate tools, educational aids and decision support aids that can help consumers to understand and engage in their own care. Providers • Clinicians’ unease about direct notification of pathology (including abnormal) results often relate to concern about patients’ understanding of, and ability to interpret results, which may lead to unnecessary anxiety and confusion on the part of patients. • Clinicians’ apprehension may also be related to the impact that direct patient access to test results has on the traditional medical practitioner role as the information gatekeeper. Georgiou, M., Legg, M., & Edwards, G. 3 November 2014. Patient access to pathology results. Pulse+IT Magazine. • RACGP response (N. Pinskier, 14 November 2014): Patients must be appropriately informed about their medical care including understanding what their test results reveal as part of a holistic approach, rather than simply as a set of numbers available online.
  • 10. Patient portals Viewing laboratory results = portal function commonly used by patients internationally Most portals provide links to trusted consumer educational resources from all aspects of data (e.g.web links from each diagnosis or each laboratory test). RNZGP Patient Portal Expert Advisory Group. Dec 2014. Patient access … via patient portals.
  • 11. Consumer choice in personal health records www.myphr.com/resources/choose.aspx “Microsoft HealthVault is truly a wonderful service for long-term health management, and a PCMag Editors' Choice. Its ability to import data from medical devices, health apps, and consumer health gadgets lets it do a lot of the heavy lifting in the background, without ever asking you to micromanage it. I love that healthcare providers can email documents right into your account in a secure way. And anyone managing a family's health needs will find it an excellent service for keeping track of all kinds of records. Set up an account now, connect a few apps and devices that you use, and return to it every so often to update information that isn't automatically added.” Duffy, J. Dec 19 2014 http://au.pcmag.com/personal- home-products/27026/review/microsoft-healthvault
  • 12. Personal health data hacking and heroics using: social media, self-quantification & citizen sensors
  • 13. 13 Why would you? curiosity, performance, control, healing, socialising Gimpel, H., Nißen, M., & Görlitz, R. (2013). Quantifying the Quantified Self: A Study on the Motivations of Patients to Track Their Own Health. Proceedings of . ICIS 2013. AISEL Image source: http://www.phonearena.com/news/Credit-Suisse-is-bullish-on-wearable-tech_id43206
  • 14. 14 Not so niche …
  • 15. How good are the data? JAMA 10 February 2015 313(6).
  • 16. Personal health data analytics and dashboards
  • 17. Personal health data sharing
  • 18. New social movements • The Quantified-Self movement was first developed in
  • 19. Introduction
  • 20. Citizen science in health • Citizens crowdsourcing data sets to explore their own biomedical research questions
  • 21. Citizen science http://povesham.wordpress.com/2011/11/27/citizen-science-as-participatory-science
  • 22. Citizen science is doing some interesting things to research models
  • 23. Extreme sensing http://theconversation.com/is-googles-project-to-monitor-healthy-people-just-a-bit-creepy-29875 • Google's experimental Google X wing ‘Project Baseline Study’ • Aim: draw genetic and molecular data from large numbers of people, to create a picture of a person in perfect health, as a baseline for [….]. • By using Google's computational power to identify "biomarkers" in the data that could help people stave off or avoid health issues • Mid-2014 began harvesting anonymous genetic and molecular information from 175 volunteers using wearable technology, • Late 2014 announced plan to use magnetic nanoparticles to monitor for signs of cancer and other diseases - you swallow a pill, call it somewhere, trap it, ask it what it saw • Owano, N. 31 January 2015 http://phys.org/news/2015-01-google-eyes- nanoparticle-platform-health.html
  • 24. Changing designs of health care and health research Health 2050: The Realization of Personalized Medicine through Crowdsourcing, the Quantified Self, and the Participatory Biocitizen M. Swan, J. Pers. Med. 2012, 2, 93-118
  • 25. Critique: “The use in research of personal fitness or health data shared on social network raises both scientific and ethical concerns.” Weigmann, K. (2014). Health research 2.0. EMBO reports, 15(3), 223-226 • “beyond contribution of genetic and phenotypic information, it is questionable that participants would truly be directing research. They did not have a say in the contours of the research or selection of the investigators who would conduct the studies. …The power to make all these decisions remained in the hands of the research sponsor (in this case, 23andMe and its partners). … it is unclear whether this approach to genetic research is truly democratizing, or is simply an illusion of collective production.” Koch, Valerie Gutmann. "PGTandMe: social networking-based genetic testing and the evolving research model." Health Matrix 22 (2012): 33. • “no means of verifying the validity of data uploaded by users … impossible to verify whether users who have uploaded data are actually the sources of that data. This opens the venue to potentially malicious usage, as genotypings from strangers can be uploaded, as well as misinformation about phenotypes can be entered. … users need to be aware of the potential of re-identification through providing metadata along with their genetic information and the genetic discrimination that could follow.” Greshake, Bastian, et al. "openSNP–A Crowdsourced Web Resource for Personal Genomics." PloS one 9.3 (2014): e89204. • “generally healthy people have internalised the notion of the ‘new public health’ and accepted the imperative of personal health responsibility. On the one hand, this bodes well for healthy individuals…. On the other hand, our findings may indicate that other factors, such as social determinants of health, are ignored in health promotion efforts and that those who cannot manage their own health may fall further behind.” MacGregor, J. C., & Wathen, C. N. (2014). 'My health is not a job': a qualitative exploration of personal health management and imperatives of the 'new public health'. BMC public health, 14(1), 726.
  • 26. Integrating patient data with clinical data for a learning healthcare system JASON, MITRE Corp. November 2014. Data for individual health. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. http://healthit.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/docs/publication/2014-jason-data-for-individual-health.pdf
  • 27. © Copyright The University of Melbourne 2015 Thank you! Contacts / enquiries: health-informatics@unimelb.edu.au

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