VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1/SUMMER 2015
Northern Arizona
Healthcare NOW!
Communications Department
1200 N. Beaver St.
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
Communications@NAHealth....
Cover story
Your best chance
for survival:
Northern Arizona
Healthcare’s trauma centers
Feature story
Above and beyond:
Sa...
Northern Arizona
Healthcare’s
trauma rooms are
well equipped,
fully staffed and
always ready for
patients.
Your best chanc...
ou may have been in a motorcycle crash, broken
your leg from falling off the roof or sustained a head
injury by diving int...
Above and beyond:
If you live in Northern Arizona, chances are you’ve seen a Guardian Air
emergency medical transport heli...
said Mark Venuti, Guardian Air and Guardian Medical Transport
director, and it’s clear that’s the way he prefers it.
Celeb...
Q&A with Richard “Dick” Kruse
Foundations for health
ichard “Dick” Kruse, Verde
Valley Medical Center board
member and tre...
About one in five Ameri-
cans suffers from seasonal
allergies, including Arizo-
nans.
Join us for the 15th annual Pepsi-Co...
Nutrition in Northern Arizona
lthough adults should drink nine to 13 cups of fluid
per day,according to the Institute of M...
How to make the perfect trail mix
he perfect trail mix is like the perfect wine – crisp, earthy, dense, with a hint of
dan...
Healthy blasts for summer 2015
Health by the numbers
Sixways to take care
of your bones and joints
According to Brian Dugg...
easy ways to get more fiber
in your diet
According to Joyce Richards, D.O., gastroenterologist at Verde Valley
Medical Cen...
14 Northern Arizona Healthcare •
Q&A: Seasonal allergies
Expert in the house
any people think they
won’t have allergies in...
New and innovative at NAH
s part of its ongoing commitment to offer patients the best
care available, Northern Arizona Hea...
This issue was made possible by the
Shirley K. Sullivan Trust
of 16

NAH NOW Summer 2015 Complete publication

Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - NAH NOW Summer 2015 Complete publication

  • 1. VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1/SUMMER 2015
  • 2. Northern Arizona Healthcare NOW! Communications Department 1200 N. Beaver St. Flagstaff, AZ 86001 Communications@NAHealth.com Richard A. Smith, Ed.D. Vice President, Communications and Development Northern Arizona Healthcare Trista MacVittie Director, Communications Northern Arizona Healthcare Editorial and production staff Contributors: Kerry Bennett Sophia Papa Sarah Sabalos-Gruber Designer: Trevor Roberson Photographer: John Burcham Northern Arizona Healthcare provides healthcare services through Flagstaff Medical Center, Verde Valley Medical Center, Team Health, Verde Valley Medical Clinic, Cancer Centers of Northern Arizona Healthcare, EntireCare Rehab & Sports Medicine, Fit Kids of Arizona, Guardian Air, Heart & Vascular Center of Northern Arizona, Northern Arizona Homecare, Northern Arizona Hospice and Valley View Care. To learn more about Northern Arizona Healthcare, visit NAHealth.com. This publication in no way seeks to serve as a substitute for professional medical care. Consult your physician before undertaking any form of medical treatment or adopting any exercise program or dietary guidelines. Copyright© 2015 Northern Arizona Healthcare. All rights reserved. Printed on recycled paper. Welcometo the premiere issue of Northern Arizona Healthcare NOW! As the Vice President of Communications and Development at Northern Arizona Healthcare, I wanted to personally invite everyone to share the excitement of launching a new publication. Why a new magazine? Because we want to let people in the communities we serve know about the great things happening at NAH. Most notably, we recently welcomed Rob Thames as our new CEO. He is already infusing new energy and vision into our culture. Here’s what else is happening: • We now have more than 3,300 employees working across the region to provide the highest quality healthcare services. • We’re continually finding new ways to improve how patients and families experience NAH. • We’re investing in your health by expanding services, building new facilities and adding talented providers to our staff. And as the healthcare industry faces some of its biggest challenges, we’re innovating to keep costs in line while ensuring we continue to offer quality and value. Please take a moment to look through NAH NOW! I’m sure you’ll find something of interest. Feel free to contact us if you have any suggestions for future issues. In health, Richard (Rick) Smith, Ed.D. Vice President, Communications and Development Northern Arizona Healthcare
  • 3. Cover story Your best chance for survival: Northern Arizona Healthcare’s trauma centers Feature story Above and beyond: Saving lives at 8,000 feet ou’ve likely heard the buzz – Northern Arizona Healthcare is continuing to grow and change. We’re undergoing a transformation, both inside and out. What does this mean? We’re working to make sure our patients receive consistent, high-quality care, no matter which provider they visit. We’re building on our strengths by investing in cutting-edge medical technologies and top-notch talent. And we’re continuously improving our relationships with the communities we serve. The NAH transformation won’t happen overnight. To sustain our competitive advantage in a constantly changing healthcare landscape, we’re learning to respond more quickly to market demands and operate in a more agile way. We’re taking a long-term view as we remain committed to providing the people of Northern Arizona with world-class healthcare services. 8 Foundations for health 10 Nutrition in Northern Arizona 12 Health by the numbers 14 Expert in the house 15 New and innovative at NAH 4 6 Watch us as we transform! Y In this issue… Inside NOW VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1 / SUMMER 2015
  • 4. Northern Arizona Healthcare’s trauma rooms are well equipped, fully staffed and always ready for patients. Your best chance for Northern Arizona Healthcare’s trauma centers
  • 5. ou may have been in a motorcycle crash, broken your leg from falling off the roof or sustained a head injury by diving into the shallow end of the pool. You weren’t expecting it, but it happened. You’re in pain, you’re scared and you need help – NOW. Luckily, the highly-trained medical professionals at Northern Arizona Healthcare’s two trauma centers – one in Cottonwood; the other in Flagstaff – are prepared for your arrival. Our doctors, nurses, orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, reconstructive plastic surgeons, cardiac surgeons, hand surgeons, pulmonary critical care specialists and interventional radiologists are here for one reason – to help you survive your injury and return to good health. According to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, a trauma center is the best place you can be when facing a life-threatening situation, because the complex, multidisciplinary care you’ll receive there improves your chances of survival by 25 percent. “A trauma center takes potentially non-survival patients and puts them into the survivor category,” said Bill Ashland, NAH director of Trauma Services at Verde Valley Medical Center and Flagstaff Medical Center. “At Northern Arizona Healthcare, our two trauma centers back up one another in order to provide the very best care to every patient.” When you come through the doors of one of our trauma centers – whether alone or under the stabilizing care of our Guardian Air or Guardian Medical Transport paramedics and specialized nurses – it’s likely you will be taken to the trauma resuscitation room. Here, the team in charge of your care will use advanced imaging technology to diagnose the nature and extent of your injuries. After that, you’ll be moved to Surgical Services, the Intensive Care Unit or another hospital department, depending on your diagnosis. If your child is the injured patient, he or she may be taken to our Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, specially designed for children and families. The critical care physician or surgeon who takes over from here will know you’re on your way; what has happened to you; and what you need next in order to make a full recovery – whether it’s stitching up the gash in your leg or setting a broken bone. You may need to stay in the hospital awhile after a major trauma. Once you’ve recovered from your injury, we’ll send you home – or if you aren’t ready to go home, we can help you arrange a move to rehabilitation or a skilled-nursing facility. Wherever you go after you leave us, we’ll make sure you understand what medications to take and how to take them, as well as options for further treatments or specialized therapies – including physical, occupational and speech – and follow-up care. What’s the difference between a trauma center and the Emergency Department? All major traumas are emergencies – but not all emergencies are traumas. “Major trauma” means you have experienced a serious, unexpected injury to your body. Trauma centers provide surgical resources to prevent the loss of life and limb offering the best chance for restoring your mobility and function. Andrew Aldridge, M.D., operates on a patient. Guardian paramedic Jessica Reinoso wheels a patient into the trauma resuscitation room for treatment. Trauma Survivors Network If you need emotional support as a trauma survivor, contact the Trauma Survivors Network, through which you can share your experiences; learn how to better manage your life after a serious injury; and gain support and hope from others. To learn more, visit traumasurvivorsnetwork.org. Y “A trauma center takes potentially non-survival patients and puts them into the survivor category.” — Bill Ashland, NAH director of Trauma Services at Verde Valley Medical Center and Flagstaff Medical Center by Sarah Sabalos-Gruber Northern Arizona Healthcare • 5
  • 6. Above and beyond: If you live in Northern Arizona, chances are you’ve seen a Guardian Air emergency medical transport helicopter flying high above, its fuselage gleaming in the sun, its rotors beating the air at 400 rpm. What you may not have witnessed, though, is the dedication of Guardian Air’s 54 clinicians, who save lives as they fly 8,000 feet in the air at 135 mph, in an aircraft not much larger than a minivan. Working 48-hour shifts, up to seven flights per shift, Guardian staff members must be ready for anything – and they’re uniquely wired to thrive on the adrenaline-fueled intensity and unpredictability required by emergency response. by Kerry Bennett at 8,000 feet Guardian Air medical crew members Stacy Meredith, Alisyn Martinez and Dustin Windle walk across the tarmac at Flagstaff Pulliam airport.
  • 7. said Mark Venuti, Guardian Air and Guardian Medical Transport director, and it’s clear that’s the way he prefers it. Celebrating 30 years Guardian Air, a member of Northern Arizona Healthcare, will celebrate its 30th anniversary this August, and Venuti couldn’t be prouder. Since 1985, the company has grown from one airplane completing 56 flights to a fleet of seven helicopters and one airplane completing more than 2,280 flights in 2014. With headquarters at the Flagstaff Pulliam Airport and bases in Cottonwood, Kingman, Page, Show Low, Tuba City and Winslow, Guardian Air services cover all Northern Arizona communities. Patients include adults, children, infants and mothers going into labor. In February, the crew on one flight delivered a baby above Mt. Elden en route to Flagstaff Medical Center. “I’m proud that we’ve developed a system that provides great patient care from multiple locations,” said Venuti. “I’m proud of the level of care we provide; the skills our clinicians bring across all the specialties. And I’m proud of our ability to make a difference in peoples’ lives.” Of all the awards and accolades it has received, the recognition Guardian Air values most is from the industry – earning continuous accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems, or CAMTS, since 1996. ICU in the sky What sets Guardian Air apart from other air medical transport companies? “We don’t just give patients a ride. We treat patients during transport – especially critical when you realize the vast distances we fly,” clinical manager Richard Swedbergh said. “We’re focused on changing the patient’s outcome during transport,” flight nurse Jason Selman explained. “We’re an ICU in the sky, qualified to make the life-and-death decisions made in any ICU on the ground.” Guardian Air staff is fully equipped and trained to transport patients to the most appropriate healthcare facility, regardless of distance. “Because we continually invest in the most advanced medical transport equipment and training to ensure we have the expertise to use it, Guardian Air can save more lives,” Venuti said. Outreach and training provide a vital service In addition to its transport role, Guardian Air is actively engaged in community outreach and educational activities. Working with local police, fire and ambulance agencies across the region, the company has trained thousands of healthcare providers, first responders and volunteers in CPR, mass casualty response and other life-saving techniques. “If we’re not flying, we’re out in the community educating people,” clinical manager Stacy Meredith said. “You saved my husband’s life.” Because they live in the communities they serve, staff members see themselves as guardians of sorts. Ask clinical manager Dustin Windle what he loves about his job, and he’ll tell you it’s being in the grocery store and hearing someone say, “Thank you for what you did. You saved my husband’s life.” Flight paramedic Adal Lopez has had similar experiences. “When I’m out in the community and someone stops me to say thank you, it makes all the effort worthwhile,” he said. What do these guardians of the air do during downtime? It’s likely they’re going above and beyond to help each other. “We’re very close – it’s like a family here,” said office coordinator Liz Oscar, who’s served at Guardian for 10 years. “We’ve shared so many life-and-death experiences – if that isn’t bonding, I don’t know what is.” “Like” Guardian Air on Facebook at facebook.com/GuardianAirTransport. “No two days are the same,” DID YOU KNOW? In 2014, Guardian Air completed more than 2,280 flights. Guardian Air director Mark Venuti is proud of making a difference in peoples’ lives. Guardian Air clinical manager Stacy Meredith demonstrates a life-saving ventilator on board a Guardian Air helicopter. “We’re an ICU in the sky, qualified to make the life-and-death decisions made in any ICU on the ground.” — Jason Selman, Guardian Air flight nurse Northern Arizona Healthcare • 7
  • 8. Q&A with Richard “Dick” Kruse Foundations for health ichard “Dick” Kruse, Verde Valley Medical Center board member and treasurer, is leading an initiative to establish the Northern Arizona Healthcare Legacy Council to support the NAH Foundation Charitable Giving Program. This program focuses on securing investment gifts to support Flagstaff Medical Center, Verde Valley Medical Center and other NAH medical campuses. Planned giving, charitable gift annuities, charitable remainder annuity trusts and charitable remainder unitrusts are some of the most common ways to make investment gifts. To help donors better understand the different types of planned giving, Kruse answers some of the most frequently asked questions. Q. What is a planned gift? A. A planned gift is any major gift made during the donor’s lifetime or at his or her death as part of the donor’s overall financial and/or estate planning. By contrast, annual appeal gifts, special events contributions or membership dues are made from a donor’s discretionary income. While they may be budgeted for, these types of gifts are not considered “planned giving.” Q. What are the three types of planned gifts? A. The three types of planned gifts are: • Outright gifts that use appreciated assets as a substitute for cash. • Gifts that return income or other financial benefits to the donor in return for the contribution. • Gifts payable upon the donor’s death. Q. What assets can a donor use to make a planned gift? A. Donors can use any of the following assets to make a planned gift: • Cash, securities – such as stocks, bonds and mutual fund shares – or real estate. • Tangible personal property, such as artwork, books, artifacts or equipment. • Business or partnership interest, such as closely held stock, a share in a professional corporation or an investment in a limited partnership. • Life insurance policies making NAH the beneficiary. • Charitable distributions from the balance remaining in a retirement plan at the donor’s death, such as an IRA or 401(k). • A gift of income from an investment or asset while retaining ultimate ownership or replacement ownership of the asset. Q: What are the tax benefits of planned giving? A: Many planned gifts are made in conjunction with donors’ tax planning strategies. While there can be many benefits, it is important to review these issues with a competent tax professional. Dick Kruse is the Chief Investment Officer of Financial Concepts, Inc., providing services to corporate retirement plans. He has also served as a staff advisor to the boards of more than 20 for-profit companies. Past business experience includes founding Financial Concepts, Inc., an employee benefits and executive compensation firm in Minneapolis. He is a founding shareholder of National Financial Partners (NYSE: NFP), eSedona wireless and Rock Properties, LLC. Dick and his wife, Becky, live in Sedona. R Making a planned gift to NAH Chicks with Sticks Monday, June 1 Pine Canyon Golf Club, Flagstaff Pepsi-Cola Taylor House Century Ride Saturday, July 18 Flagstaff Medical Center Machine Solutions Run and Walk for Kids Saturday, Aug. 1 Fort Tuthill County Park, Flagstaff Holes for Heart Care Thursday, Sept. 17 Seven Canyon Golf Club, Sedona NAH Cardio Conference Friday, Oct. 9 and Saturday, Oct. 10 High Country Conference Center, Flagstaff Turquoise Ball Saturday, Dec. 5 High Country Conference Center, Flagstaff NAH Foundation special events with CENTURY RIDE Interested in giving? Contact Allen Chapa at 928-773-2426 to find out how. Richard “Dick” Kruse 8 Northern Arizona Healthcare •
  • 9. About one in five Ameri- cans suffers from seasonal allergies, including Arizo- nans. Join us for the 15th annual Pepsi-Cola Taylor House Century Ride Providing family-centered care is a priority at Northern Arizona Healthcare,and we understand the role family plays in a patient’s healing process. NAH established The Taylor House, located around the corner from FMC, to provide affordable accommodations for families. The Taylor House provides a warm, soothing space for out-of-town families to call home while their loved ones are cared for in emergency situations and for planned procedures. The Taylor House, which is conveniently located close to city buses, grocery stores and pharmacies, offers guests a range of services and amenities, including free shuttle service to and from Flagstaff Medical Center and the Cancer Centers of Northern Arizona Healthcare, a spacious great room, four fully equipped kitchens, wireless Internet service and a supportive, caring staff. The Taylor House provides families a home away from home Each year, the Northern Arizona Healthcare’s Flagstaff Medical Center Foundation hosts a road bike ride to raise money to support The Taylor House in its mission to provide affordable lodging close to FMC for patients’ families. Join us Saturday, July 18, to support this cause. All four rides begin at the FMC West Campus parking lot, 1200 N. Beaver St., at 7 a.m.: Century Ride Loop – 95 miles Painted Desert Ride – 65 miles Sunset Crater Ride – 45 miles Slayton Ranch Loop – 30 miles How to register To register online, visit absolutebikes.net/community/events/taylor-house. For more information, call 877-527-5291. PEPSI-COLA TAYLOR HOUSE CENTURY RIDE 2015 Northern Arizona Healthcare • 9
  • 10. Nutrition in Northern Arizona lthough adults should drink nine to 13 cups of fluid per day,according to the Institute of Medicine, the average American drinks only four cups. In Northern Arizona, where the dry desert climates and high altitudes rob your body of fluids, you need to make an extra effort to stay hydrated – in fact, dehydration can result in heat exhaustion or heat stroke in summer months if you don’t. As Battalion Chief of Guardian Medical Transport, Pete Walka has seen hundreds of patients suffer from these serious conditions. He urges people to pay attention to the amount of water they drink, especially when enjoying outdoor activities. In case you need more reasons to drink up, here are just a few things water does for us: • Halts headaches Dehydration depletes your body’s water reserves, which can make your head pound. • Aids digestion Strong acids involved in digestion need water to work well; without it, you may experience painful heartburn and indigestion. • Reduces your appetite Water stimulates metabolic function and naturally suppresses appetite. Dehydration is often confused with hunger. • Regulates elimination Digestive problems in and below the large intestine, including constipation, are often caused by inadequate hydration. • Keeps you energized Caffeine, a diuretic, actually reduces the amount of water in your system, which can make you feel tired. Drinking plenty of water instead of too much coffee will raise your energy levels in the morning and keep them up throughout the day. • Keeps your skin looking young The water in your body is most visible on the surface. Proper hydration helps prevent wrinkles and blemishes and promotes a healthy glow. • Lubricates your joints Your joints are fluid-filled and must be hydrated in order to work well – especially the discs between your vertebrae. If you suffer from low back pain, drinking water can help. Experts agree you should drink water even when you don’t feel thirsty. In the mornings: Drink a glass of water when you first wake up to jumpstart your metabolism and get your body ready for the day. Before each meal: Drink water before eating a meal to help you feel fuller. Before and after working out: Drink water to help prevent dehydration during a workout and replenish lost fluids from sweating. Before going to sleep: Drink water before going to bed to help hydrate your body while sleeping. However, to avoid getting up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom, don’t drink anything two hours before bedtime. Good hydrations How to tell whether you’re drinking enough water One of the best ways to tell whether you’re hydrated is to monitor your urine. If your urine is pale yellow or clear in color you are consuming enough fluids; if your urine is dark yellow and odorous (and you’re not taking any medication or vitamin that causes this) you probably need more water. If you experience nausea, chills, increased heart rate, inability to sweat and lightheadedness, go see a doctor – these are signs of severe dehydration. How to get more water during your day 10 Northern Arizona Healthcare • .. . the average American drinks only four cups per day.
  • 11. How to make the perfect trail mix he perfect trail mix is like the perfect wine – crisp, earthy, dense, with a hint of danger and good for a picnic. And just as with wine, trail mix possibilities are endless. There can be no one trail mix recipe, and there can be no exact measurements. Here, however, is a trail mix blueprint, adjustable to your particular trail mix crav- ings, from Fit Kids of Arizona dietitian Megan Anderson. You will need a mixing bowl, a spoon, and a willingness to go where no trail mixer has gone before. The following feeds two hungry people. Feeding more than two people? Relax – just use more stuff. Ingredients 1 cup nuts. Choose one or more of the following varieties: Almonds, peanuts, cashews, pistachios, walnuts, macadamias, Brazil nuts or pecans. Use unsalted and unsweetened so you don’t throw off the delicate balance of flavors. ¼ cup seeds. Try hemp, sunflower, sesame and/or pumpkin. We’d say go for flax seeds as well, but whole flax seeds really tend to stick to your teeth. Save the flax seeds for when you make a smoothie. ¼ cup grains. Throw in some pretzels, granola, toasted oats or bran flakes. ¼ cup dried fruit. Go wild! Cherries, strawberries, blueberries, raisins, mango, pineapple, dates, banana chips, apples, pears and peaches are all good choices. A sprinkling of sweets. Whatever you’re into – dark chocolate chips, white chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, M&Ms, those tiny peanut butter cups. Go easy, though. As Clint Eastwood once said, “Men must know their limitations.” Wacky add-ons for the brave, intrepid snacker. Try a dash of edamame beans, wasabi peas, dried ginger or coffee beans. Directions Mix it all up in a medium-sized bowl. Put it in a little bag if you’re actually going to eat the mix as you happily hike or bike along a trail, or spoon it right out of the bowl if you’re eating it on the couch with a movie. Enjoy! Healthy teeth = healthy heart? Can the billions of bacteria and other microscopic critters that live in your mouth and cause dental disease also cause problems in other areas of your body? Although the connection between dental health and heart health is not completely clear, experts see links between the two. According to James Dwyer, M.D., paying attention to your dental health may give you more than a healthy smile. It may help keep your heart healthy, too. Inflammation: One possible link between heart disease and dental disease is inflammation. Hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, and plaque buildup in the arteries is an inflammatory process. Gingivitis, the beginning stages of gum disease, occurs when the gums become inflamed and there is too much bacteria in the mouth. Bacteria: Several species of bacteria that cause dental disease have been found in the plaque in arteries in the heart and body. This suggests that harmful oral bacteria not only compromises dental health, but also heart and vascular health. Plaque: Gingivitis is caused by plaque buildup along and below the gum line. Atherosclerosis is caused by a different kind of plaque buildup in the walls of the arteries. Risk factors: Many of the risk factors for dental disease and heart disease are the same: tobacco use, poor nutrition, age and poor hygiene habits. Healthy teeth, healthy heart, healthy you: Prevention goes a long way. Some of the best ways to decrease the risk factors associated with dental and heart disease are the easiest: brush and floss regularly; eat a diet high in protein, fruits and vegetables; avoid sugar; quit tobacco; exercise regularly; manage stress; and see your healthcare provider and dentist regularly. T Northern Arizona Healthcare • 11
  • 12. Healthy blasts for summer 2015 Health by the numbers Sixways to take care of your bones and joints According to Brian Duggan, M.D., orthopedic surgeon at Verde Valley Medical Center, here are some ways you can keep your skeleton strong and prevent the need for orthopedic surgery: • Active bones and joints are strong bones and joints: Get regular exercise (3-5 half-hour sessions each week; walking counts) to increase strength and flexibility. Don’t forget to warm up – your joints will thank you. • Maintain a healthy weight for your height. • Get enough Vitamin D (sunlight helps!) and calcium from milk, cheese, yogurt and leafy green vegetables. • Go easy on the alcohol. Too much gets in the way of your body’s production of calcium-absorbing hormones and vitamins – and increases your risk of falling and breaking a bone.   • Practice good posture – keep your back straight whether standing or sitting, and distribute your weight evenly on both feet. Always sit with proper back support. • Resist the temptation to bring all the groceries in at once – make several trips to carry lighter loads. 3 reasons to unplug Here are some of the benefits of unplugging from your electronic devices for an hour or two every day, according to Sandra Roberge, clinical manager with Behavioral Health at Verde Valley Medical Center: • More meaningful face-to-face human interaction. • Deeper appreciation for what you have; less Facebook- and Instagram-inspired envy. Remember: People post the curated version of their lives they want you to see. • Less consumption; more creativity! We spend most of our waking hours at work – here are some tips for making them healthier hours from Michelle Gorman of Employee Health at Verde Valley Medical Center: • Spend most of your day sitting? Get up and stretch at least once per hour to avoid eye strain, neck tension, rounded shoulders and fatigue. • Spend most of your day on your feet?  Be sure you take steps to maintain good core strength, including proper rest, nutrition, exercise, and use of body mechanics. • Avoid energy crash with one of these snack combos – peanut butter and a banana, or hummus and veggies, or Greek yogurt and fruit. These snacks have slow digesting carbohydrates and fiber, which help you feel fuller, longer. • Minimize contact with toxic co-workers as much as you are able, and take a brisk walk during lunch - even 10 minutes can help re-center and refresh you. • Keep those keyboards, door handles, telephones, and work surfaces clean! Wash your hands often and use sanitizing wipes daily and as needed on surfaces. • If you do get sick, stay home. Your colleagues can manage without you for one day, and appreciate you not exposing the rest of the workplace to your illness. • If you feel overwhelmed by stress about a problem, ask yourself: Will anyone care about this a month from now? 7hacksfor a healthier workday 12 Northern Arizona Healthcare • Michelle Gorman Brian Duggan, M.D. Sandra Roberge
  • 13. easy ways to get more fiber in your diet According to Joyce Richards, D.O., gastroenterologist at Verde Valley Medical Center: • Always choose the whole-grain version of instead of white; whole-wheat or 12-grain bread instead of the kind you can roll up and mush into a ball. • Find a fiber-rich cereal you like in order to get a jump on your fiber intake in the mornings. • Eat fruit, vegetables and a small handful of whole nuts for snacks - the protein, fat and fiber will keep you fuller longer than any one of these foods alone. • Fiber supplements are now available in delicious gummy-style candies – you no longer have to mix up a gritty concoctionto drink! Babies! Babies! Babies by the numbers! According to Deb Ledington, neonatal nurse practitioner and director of Women and Infants’ Services at Flagstaff Medical Center, 1,266 babies were born at FMC in 2014. According to Mahin Wright, interim director of Surgical and Perinatal Services at VVMC, 583 babies were born there. 4 Sleeping well is one of the cornerstones of good health – here’s how to get more of it, according to Matthew Hall, polysom- nographic neurodiagnostic technician at Northern Arizona Healthcare’s Verde Valley Sleep Disorder Center: • Put your cell phone in another room, or at least all the way across the bedroom. Electronics suck you down the rabbit hole of wakefulness, plus the blue light from computers and cell phones disrupts your sleep cycle. • Don’t sleep with pets. Though cuddly, they are also nocturnal and can wake you up several times a night whether or not you realize it. • Eat your last meal at least three hours before bedtime – without alcohol. • Focus on your breathing – inhale for a count of five; hold for a count of three; exhale for a count of seven. • Go to bed and get up at the same times, consistently. Do this long enough, and your body will naturally settle into a sleep cycle that works for you. FIVEways to get better sleep Joyce Richards, D.O. Matthew Hall Deb Ledington Mahin Wright Northern Arizona Healthcare • 13
  • 14. 14 Northern Arizona Healthcare • Q&A: Seasonal allergies Expert in the house any people think they won’t have allergies in Arizona because it is so dry. However, anyone who has spent any length of time in the state knows differently. About one in five Americans suffers from seasonal allergies, and that statistic includes Arizonans. Elaine Laemmrich, family nurse practitioner at Northern Arizona Healthcare’s Team Health in Flagstaff, sheds some light on how to manage common allergies. Q: How do you know whether your symptoms are caused by allergies or a cold? A: Seasonal allergies are accompanied by sneezing; runny nose; itchy eyes, ears or throat; and watery eyes. A cold includes some of these symptoms, but may also involve fever, body aches and sore throat. Allergies last as long as pollen counts are high – days to weeks; a cold or the flu usually only lasts five to seven days. Q: Do allergies change according to the season? A: Yes. Seasonal allergies are most common during the spring and fall when pollen counts are the highest. In the spring, tree pollen is the biggest culprit for allergy suffers. Summer grasses cause many people misery; followed by severe allergies in the fall caused by weeds, especially ragweed. Some people suffer allergies all year due to mold, dust, pet dander and a handful of other allergens. Q: Why are allergies so bad in Arizona? A: Many people move to Arizona’s dry climate to help alleviate their allergies and asthma. However, Arizona’s dry climate worsens allergies caused by plants. Dry air increases the dehydration and buoyancy of pollen, so it can travel great distances. Some wind-borne pollen may rise to 40,000 feet and travel more than 50 miles. This means that even though you don’t live in the desert or in the pines, you may still be exposed to pollens from these areas. Q: What are some tips for decreasing allergy symptoms? A: Here are some ways to decrease exposure to misery-causing allergens: • Stay indoors on windy days and when the pollen count is high. • Keep doors and windows closed and use air conditioning to stay cool. • Clean all air filters and use air purifiers. • Vacuum often, including floors and furniture; use a vacuum with a HEPA filter. • Don’t hang clothes outside to dry. • Use a humidifier to decrease air movement of pollens. • Shower and wash hair immediately after being outside for extended periods of time. Q: What are some natural or homeopathic remedies to treat allergies? A: Once your body builds a tolerance to an allergen, the symptoms will decrease. One way to help build a tolerance is to consume honey from local bees. These bees use local pollens to make the honey. Ingesting a tablespoon a day will help you build a tolerance to local pollens. Also, many people use a Neti pot of lukewarm salt water every day, especially when pollen counts are high. A Neti pot helps flush pollen and other allergens from your sinuses. And of course, eating a healthy diet rich in nutrients and vitamins will boost overall immunity. For instance, Vitamin C is a natural antihistamine. Q: Are there medications that can help decrease symptoms? A: Most allergies can be treated with over-the-counter medications. Antihistamines reduce sneezing, sniffling and itching. Decongestants help keep nasal passages clear and reduce inflammation. Eye drops relieve itchy, watery eyes. When over-the-counter medications are not enough, your healthcare provider can prescribe stronger medications, such as nasal steroids and prescription eye drops. Be sure to talk with your healthcare provider before starting any medication. Q: When is it time to see an allergist? A: If symptoms persist for more than two months with no relief, then seeing an allergist – a provider who specializes in treating people with allergies – might be recommended. The allergist may suggest allergy testing, which involves blood or skin testing, to identify specific allergies. If other treatments haven’t worked, allergy shots may be given to help build up a tolerance to specific allergies. To make an appointment with Elaine Laemmrich, call 928-913-8800. “Like” Team Health on Facebook at facebook.com/TeamHealth. M DID YOU KNOW? About one in five Americans suffers from seasonal allergies, and that statistic includes Arizonans. Elaine Laemmrich
  • 15. New and innovative at NAH s part of its ongoing commitment to offer patients the best care available, Northern Arizona Healthcare continues to invest in some of the most advanced medical imaging technologies on the market. New 3T MRI at Verde Valley Medical Imaging Center At Verde Valley Medical Imaging Center in Cottonwood, a new 3T magnetic resonance imaging scan, or MRI, machine coming this summer will make the procedure much more comfortable for patients. Its cutting-edge technology will deliver faster, higher quality images to help doctors make informed, accurate diagnoses. Older MRI equipment often causes patients to feel claustrophobic, but the new machine is larger, designed to accommodate patients of all sizes, from small children to adults up to 550 pounds. An MRI machine uses an electromagnetic field and radio waves to create detailed images of the human body. In MRI lingo, 3T stands for “three Tesla,” which means the machine’s magnet is among the strongest in the world. As a result, the 3T MRI creates remarkably clear, high-resolution pictures of internal anatomy with a significant level of accuracy, so your doctor can see exactly what is wrong and where. “This is an excellent addition to the NAH MRI fleet. Because it is state- of-the-art, the 3T delivers superb image quality and results in increased physician satisfaction. More importantly, it decreases patients’ claustrophobic fears when undergoing an MRI,” said Liz Palomino, NAH Medical Imaging Services director. A Investing in advanced technologies for higher quality medical imaging New interventional radiology lab at Flagstaff Medical Center Northern Arizona Healthcare’s Flagstaff Medical Center is building a new interventional radiology laboratory scheduled to open this summer, which will feature a new angiography machine. Physicians often rely on angiography to view images of blood vessels and organs of the body, which help them determine whether blood vessels are narrowed or blocked. With the ability to take live x-rays and rotate 360 degrees, this new machine gives physicians highly detailed images of patients’ blood vessels during diagnostic and treatment procedures – and is designed to expose patients to the lowest possible radiation dose. “FMC will be the only facility in Northern Arizona to have this angiography technology,” Palomino said. “Patients will no longer have to travel to Phoenix for their interventional radiology needs.” by Sophia Papa “FMC will be the only facility in Northern Arizona to have this angiography technology.” — Liz Palomino, NAH director of Medical Imaging Services Northern Arizona Healthcare • 15
  • 16. This issue was made possible by the Shirley K. Sullivan Trust

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