9 Simple Steps for Volunteers to ‘Stay in the Loop’
What is preservation?
broader term concerned with the environment with which the artefact
or record is held, and its ong...
P&C is crucial to all information professions and professionals
To assist in its successful application we need the help ...
Three major environmental effects are:
high temperature and relative humidity levels
advances chemical changes in materi...
Handling and storage is the biggest issue with records of all types
We preserve materials so they can be used, but, parad...
The first thing to work out is what are you trying to preserve?
preservation of artefact
storage environment
conservati...
Decisions can be made about which environmental factors are the most
important to attempt to control for a specific colle...
Funding is always an issue – there is nothing cheap in preservation
This can particularly be an issue when dealing with s...
Education represents a relatively low-cost preservation activity
Information professionals must now acknowledge that pres...
A perfect environment is not achievable
However, providing an environment that is achievable in relation to
a building’s...
Bankole, O.M. (2010, January 15). A review of biological deterioration of
library materials and possible control strategi...
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Preservation and conservation in your local museum

Preservation and conservation in your local museum. 9 Simple Steps for Volunteers to ‘Stay in the Loop’
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Preservation and conservation in your local museum

  • 1. 9 Simple Steps for Volunteers to ‘Stay in the Loop’
  • 2. What is preservation? broader term concerned with the environment with which the artefact or record is held, and its ongoing management What is conservation? narrower term involving a more intensive and direct approach on the material itself Why do we need them? the main reason is simply because things deteriorate – and depending on the material and storage / handling, this can take place very rapidly The ‘preservation balancing act’ allowing users maximum access to information while minimising deterioration inherent in providing this access
  • 3. P&C is crucial to all information professions and professionals To assist in its successful application we need the help of volunteers and the public too By halting the effects of deterioration we can preserve important information and heritage for future generations Also imperative for issues of authenticity, evidence, and integrity It is important to remember that: everything we use has built-in deterioration factors rate of deterioration is dependent on the type of material deterioration is dependent on housing / handling conditions
  • 4. Three major environmental effects are: high temperature and relative humidity levels advances chemical changes in materials can weaken and compromise structure of materials damage from light sources UV light whether from the sun or artificial biological agents moulds insects vermin We must also remember that these effects are not necessarily mutually exclusive; i.e. high temperature and RH produce conditions where biological agents flourish
  • 5. Handling and storage is the biggest issue with records of all types We preserve materials so they can be used, but, paradoxically, use results in damage We typically do not have much control over how objects in the collections of cultural institutions are made and what they are made from – intrinsic factors We do have more control over how objects are stored and how they are handled – extrinsic factors Extrinsic factors intensify intrinsic factors Enclosures protect objects from the normal wear and tear of being handled and stored
  • 6. The first thing to work out is what are you trying to preserve? preservation of artefact storage environment conservation treatments training and awareness preservation of content conversion With preservation you can implement different techniques: preventative primarily concerned with good housekeeping and looking after the environment housing materials restorative repairing damage that has already occurred to an artefact proactive maintaining artefacts
  • 7. Decisions can be made about which environmental factors are the most important to attempt to control for a specific collection An important aspect is also disaster preparedness Collections can be more easily managed by dividing them into their broad component characteristics: organic inorganic composite or mixed Objects made from inorganic materials are relatively unreactive to the environmental conditions in which they are stored Other relevant issues include: risk of natural or mechanical disaster vandalism or theft
  • 8. Funding is always an issue – there is nothing cheap in preservation This can particularly be an issue when dealing with small or locally funded museums Museums typically undertake long-term preservation of its items and therefore this is an ongoing and ultimately costly undertaking Decisions have implications for the management of the institution, for its budgetary needs and commitments, for the services which it can provide to its users, and for its need for facilities and systems There are, however, a number of simple and cost-effective measures that can be applied: implement preventative and proactive preservation where possible undertake preservation actions which address large quantities of material it is essential to set priorities for resource allocation
  • 9. Education represents a relatively low-cost preservation activity Information professionals must now acknowledge that preservation is a responsibility they all share, whatever their role in an organisation In addition to the training of staff and volunteers, education programs can be offered to the wider public and not only cover handling and preservation methods, but create interest in the museum Preservation is the responsibility of all, from the creators of the object to the users of the object All parties must advocate for preservation, including government The costs of staff and volunteer training in minor repairs are minimal, especially in comparison with full conservation techniques that may be needed if damage is not prevented or left untreated
  • 10. A perfect environment is not achievable However, providing an environment that is achievable in relation to a building’s structure, the local climate in which the building is located, and available resources is highly desirable Sustainability in museums is a pertinent topic and the need to reduce the environmental impact of buildings also saves on running costs A new initiative is to create or convert structures into ‘positive energy buildings’ Programs such as the harnessing of solar energy via solar cells is a good place to stat
  • 11. Bankole, O.M. (2010, January 15). A review of biological deterioration of library materials and possible control strategies in the tropics. Library Review, 59(6), 414-429. Collections Trust. (2014). The opportunity for museums in going green. [Web Page]. Retrieved August 22, 2014, from http://www.collectionstrust.org.uk/energy-efficiency/the-opportunity-formuseums-in-going-green Gorman, G.E. & Shep, S.J. (eds.) (2006). Preservation Management for Libraries, Archives and Museums. London: Facet Publishing. Harvey, D. R. & Mahard, M. R. (eds.) (2014). Preservation Management Handbook: A 21st-century guide for libraries, archives, and museums. Lanham: Rowan & Littlefield Publishers. Ling, T. (1994). Silver Linings: Purpose Built Repositories – The Last 25 Years. Archives and Manuscripts, 22(2): 361-382. State Records Office of Western Australia. (2009). Directions for keeping hardcopy State archives awaiting transfer to the State Records Office. State Records Office of WA, Perth: Western Australia.