Trailer Analysis
Kerry Pether
Pride (2014)
Short takes showing montages of old, real footage of protestors on
strike which imply the narratives content. This adds an...
The wide/establishing shot highlights how isolated the groups
location is, and also shows the juxtaposition between the gr...
The intertitles which show the audience that the film is based on a
true story make the film more real, engaging the audie...
Short takes are used throughout the trailer, again to emphasise the
violence which is taking place, and showing the audien...
The intertitles which show the films awards and reviews encourage
the audience to go and watch it by giving it a good repu...
The name of the film is shown in bright colours, again adhering the its
positive message and representing the word “Pride”...
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Pride (2014) ppt

Pride (2014) Trailer Analysis
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Social Media      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Pride (2014) ppt

  • 1. Trailer Analysis Kerry Pether Pride (2014)
  • 2. Short takes showing montages of old, real footage of protestors on strike which imply the narratives content. This adds an element of verisimilitude to the scene, as the audience is allowed to see the context of the film and some historical background. The voiceover/non-diegetic sound of a radio broadcast discussing the strikes which can be seen taking place on screen which represents what can be seen on screen. Intertitles help the audience to understand what is happening within the trailer, whilst putting the film into context, whilst the diegetic music shows that the issues that the town is facing due to the conflicts that are taking place. The black and white intertitles show that the beginning of the trailer is negative, whilst also adding a serious tone to the trailer. Slow zoom into the male subjects face, highlighting both his serious expression and the message which appears on the newspaper that he is holding. He is wearing traditional clothing which is seen often in social realist films, which have connotations of the character being violent. Diegetic dialogue discussing the conflicts that are occurring, putting the audience into context and also could be showing that the male character wants to get involved in the conflicts, although it is later shown that he wants to protest peacefully. This could adhere to Earp & Katz ‘All men are violent’ theory.
  • 3. The wide/establishing shot highlights how isolated the groups location is, and also shows the juxtaposition between the group (bright, yellow) and their dull surroundings. This highlights the binary opposites (Strauss) between the community that the characters are visiting, and themselves as they look quite loud and bright, contrasting against the dull surroundings. Synchronous slow music emphasises the seriousness of the group’s trip, and also matches their dull surroundings. The low angle shot makes the group look menacing, highlighting the seriousness of their visit but juxtaposing the following lines/shots which are more comedic. This could adhere to Earp & Katz theory, and also highlights how the other female characters are stood in the background, making them look subordinate. The sound cuts off suddenly, emphasising the line from the older female subject - [“Guy, your gays are here.”] The short takes which follow allow the audience to see the different responses that the group get from the public, mainly negative. The wide shot allows us to see more of their costume, again adhering to common representations of youth in social realist films, and in the media, as they all look quite scruffy and untidy. (O’Sullivan et al). The diegetic music returns, this time upbeat which matches the inspirational message that the group are trying to portray, and emphasises the comedic lines of some of the characters.
  • 4. The intertitles which show the audience that the film is based on a true story make the film more real, engaging the audience and adhering the social-realist conventions. The house colours of the trailer are used here (yellow and red), which show positive connotations, linking in with the word “inspirational” which is used within the intertitles. Long take focusing on the older female subject to emphasise her speech which juxtaposes the common representations of older people being homophobic, as she is showing her support for the group – this could be controversial for an older audience (Oppositional audience).The female highlights binary opposite characters (Strauss) as she is wearing clean, upper class clothing whilst the youth look quite untidy in comparison, however it juxtaposes most social realist films as the younger and older characters are working together. Long take of the two opposing groups shaking hands to show the unity between them, adding an element of hope to the trailer and showing the impact that the group had on the community Slow zoom into the two hands, again to emphasise the unity between the two groups. The mise-en-scene appears to be in a bar or a pub, which is a common setting for most social realist films, and is often shown in a negative way however this juxtaposes that as they are getting along.
  • 5. Short takes are used throughout the trailer, again to emphasise the violence which is taking place, and showing the audience what the group was trying to change whilst adhering to the genres conventions. A-synchronous dance music starts to play, juxtaposing the action which is taking place on the screen but perhaps representing the young group and their lives which is a common convention for most social realist films. Throughout the numerous short takes, this male subjects speech can be heard over the top (as a voiceover) who is discussing the group in a positive way, again adding an element of hope to the trailer and showing the positive message that the group are trying to portray. This juxtaposes typical conventions of social realist films, as usually the groups and gangs that are shown have a negative message with themes such as racism or drug abuse. The wide, long take of the group highlights the juxtaposition of the older group and the younger group (Strauss, binary opposites), which is unusual within the film industry as they are working together. It also emphasises the comedic elements of the scene whilst the older subject tries to understand the younger group. We are also able to see the different character types (Propp) as the older characters are seen to be the helpers, or donors, for the younger youth.
  • 6. The intertitles which show the films awards and reviews encourage the audience to go and watch it by giving it a good reputation, whilst the bold, yellow writing emphasises the positive message of the film. This encourages audiences to watch the film as it gives it a positive reputation. The bright colours and positive background image have connotations of hope and inspiration, highlighting one of the key themes to the film and again encouraging audiences to view it. ^^^ The background images that are used for the intertitles also represent the group and what they stand for, showing the support that they have gained from the public, and a stage show which they performed Although the scene should be emotional and thought provoking, the diegetic dialogue [“Where are my lesbians?”] juxtaposes this, adhering to the films upbeat message and showing the unity between the older characters and younger characters. This also highlights the binary opposite characters (Strauss) as it is unusual for the youth and older characters to get along in social realist films, as they are usually seen to be fighting against each other.
  • 7. The name of the film is shown in bright colours, again adhering the its positive message and representing the word “Pride” in a literal sense as it has connotations of being proud, and happy, whilst the fast dance music (SOUND) is synchronous and helps to portray the films positive message as well, and encourages a younger audience to go and watch it as it is similar to the type of music that they are likely to be listening to. (Preferred audience) The final medium shot highlights once more the unity between the older and younger group as binary opposite characters (Strauss), whilst their promiscuous dialogue adds an element of comedy to the scene, ending the trailer in a positive way and creating an image that is likely to stick in the audiences mind. The differences in the characters costumes also highlights the differences in the characters, as the older people again look quite tidy and clean, whilst the younger people look quite rough and unclean – a dominant ideology of youth. The final intertitles, again in the bright colours which run throughout the trailer which has positive connotations, allows the audience to know when the film can be viewed in a cinema, whilst also increasing the chance of an active audience by adding social media links, such as their website which encourages social interaction between the audience and the film.

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