2
It has been said that a college
diploma is like a share of stock: as
a college or university’s academic
programs, facult...
3
our strategic objectives and shared
the importance of the “Four Pillars”
that serve as a foundation for a
Woodbury educa...
44
It’s the 1960s and Tom Jones (no, not
that Tom Jones) is a freshman at the
University of Arizona. Things aren’t
going a...
55
second—but a close second. “If you’re
not happy at home, you’re not happy
at work and vice versa,” he recounts.
“Make s...
6
Brand loyalty, that reflex of buying repeatedly from the
same manufacturer, can rightly be seen as the ‘holy grail’ of
m...
7
It’s not always easy to keep dreams
alive, but it tends to be worth the
effort. And when the pursuit of a
quality educat...
8
A critic once wrote that artist and Woodbury associate
professor Patrick Nickell’s sculptures seem to be inspired by
“th...
9
Following a 2002 solo exhibition at Solway Jones Gallery in
Los Angeles, Nickell’s work was featured in “Patrick Nickell...
10
Woodbury’s Norman Millar,
AIA, Dean of the School of
Architecture, has quietly
emerged as one of the
nation’s leading a...
11
readies students for the cultural,
economic and physical challenges
of contemporary practice in the
global economy.”
Be...
12
Statements of Financial Position
at June 30, 2014 and 2013
2014 2013
ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents $ 313,136 $ 1,579...
13
Statements of Activities
Year Ended June 30, 2014
Unrestricted
Temporarily
Restricted
Permanently
Restricted Total
Reve...
14
Henry M. Anding, CPA
Anonymous (2)
Samuel Armstrong ‘73
Prof. Sydney Lawrence
Balbes ‘60
Edward W. Blazer ‘59
Lowell K....
15
Chairman
David J. St. Amant
President & Chief Operating Officer
Econolite Group, Anaheim
Vice-Chair & Chair-Elect
Lawre...
7500 North Glenoaks Boulevard • Burbank, California 91504-1052
2212 Main Street • San Diego, California 92113-3641
woodbur...
President_Report-2014
of 16

President_Report-2014

Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - President_Report-2014

  • 1. 2 It has been said that a college diploma is like a share of stock: as a college or university’s academic programs, faculty and alumni become known and grow over time, so does the long-term value of that institution’s name on a graduate’s resume. This year’s President’s Report provides an update on Woodbury University’s financial performance for 2014 and outlines the progress we’ve made toward building the reputation and lifelong value of a Woodbury University education. The report also pays tribute to the extraordinary accomplishments and contributions of several Woodbury University alumni and faculty members, recognizing those who have so generously supported Woodbury and helped to increase the value of every graduate’s share of Woodbury “stock” [see related article, “Funding Woodbury’s Future Growth”]. Recognized Among the Best Woodbury University “shareholders” can take pride in the recognition the university is receiving and in its growing reputation in Southern California and across the nation: • In July, Money magazine ranked Woodbury No. 15 on their list of the nation’s “25 Colleges That Add the Most Value.” Woodbury was among 1,500 four-year colleges evaluated in three categories: educational quality, affordability, and alumni career earnings. Addressing challenges in these and other areas will continue to be high on our agenda in 2015 and beyond. • Woodbury also received top marks from U.S. News & World Report in its annual listing, ranking No. 56 among 125 Western regional universities, No. 2 in the percentage of international students we serve (No.1 among our California-based peers), and No. 18 in a relatively new category—–best colleges in the West for veterans of the armed services. • Woodbury also was named to the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for 2014, which acknowledges colleges and universities that play an active role in solving community problems, achieve measurable outcomes in the communities they serve, and motivate students to pursue a lifelong path of civic engagement. The list of publications and organizations that have recognized Woodbury, its faculty, students and alumni during 2014 goes on and on. This recognition does not come by accident. Rather, it is proof that Woodbury is making tangible progress toward achieving our long-range goals. One of these goals has been to increase the percentage of freshmen who complete a degree and ultimately obtain gainful employment. I am pleased to report that the percentage of first-time freshmen who graduated from Woodbury has increased from 53 percent in 2011-12, to 59 percent in 2013-14. What’s more, post-graduation employment rose from 84 percent for the Class of 2011, to 88 percent for the Class of 2013. Mean earnings also have improved from $45,000 for the Class of 2011 to $53,000 for the Class of 2014. Strategy Into Action In the past two reports, I described President’s MessageLuís María R. Calingo, Ph.D. Woodbury alumni can take great pride in the progress made toward the achievement of the university’s long-term strategic goals. Here are some of the ways the value of a Woodbury education continued to grow during 2014.
  • 2. 3 our strategic objectives and shared the importance of the “Four Pillars” that serve as a foundation for a Woodbury education—design thinking, entrepreneurship, transdisciplinarity and civic engagement. Since I last reported to you, we have taken a number of important steps toward their achievement. In 2014, Woodbury formally introduced the College of Transdisciplinarity, which provides a distinctive curriculum that challenges students to utilize critical thinking and problem-solving to discover new ways their talents and skills can benefit the greater community. We also took action to implement the Woodbury Integrated Student Experience, or “WISE.” Under this program, by the time a student graduates, he or she will have compiled a portfolio of enriching educational experiences, including an internship, study-away or -abroad experience, student leadership development, community service engagement, and faculty-mentored scholarship. At a time when colleges and universities are struggling to remain relevant to their students, Woodbury University will differentiate itself from its peer institutions by offering students the opportunity to enjoy and benefit from a liberal arts- based professional education that will make a difference in their lives, as well as in the lives of others. Investing in Woodbury’s Future Of course, none of this can be achieved without a Board of Trustees and an administration with the courage and discipline to carry out this long-term vision, a talented and committed faculty and staff to inspire our students academically, students who challenge us to create ever more innovative programs, and alumni who mentor our students and share the fruits of their success so that Woodbury University can continue to thrive. In this President’s Report, we salute Arthur Zenian (Class of 2002), whose entrepreneurial skills and commitment to civic engagement have helped him succeed in biomedical engineering and hospital IT management. We also celebrate Tom Jones (Class of 1968), principal with Gamble Jones Investment Counsel in Pasadena and Portland, who explains how Woodbury’s personal touch had a positive impact on his career and the careers of several family members who also are Woodbury alumni. Finally, there’s Cesar Foglio (Class of 1964), a leader in Tijuana’s manufacturing community who turned to Woodbury for the specialized skills he needed to establish an export- import business and succeed both south and north of the border. Then, as now, Woodbury has helped open the door to multinational relationships and encourage transdisciplinarity across borders through the development of Woodbury University’s San Diego campus. A Fond Farewell As you may know, I recently announced my decision to step down as Woodbury’s president, effective June 30, 2015. Late last fall, I advised the leadership of our Board of Trustees of my intention not to seek an extension of my contract, which expires at the end of this year. I did so after a thorough reflection of the accomplishments that Woodbury has had during my presidency. The Board hired me three years ago to develop and execute a strategic plan that would bring Woodbury to the next level of competitiveness, distinction, and excellence. The first phase of that strategic plan is our ongoing capacity-building in preparation for a period of growth. Not only is that period of capacity-building substantially complete, we have also achieved in less than three years what I originally thought we would accomplish in five years. Leading Woodbury University has been the highlight of my career in educational administration. Woodbury is rich in both challenges and opportunities, all of which have been addressed in an environment of respectful dialogue and collegial relationships. We all share a common objective: taking students from a diversity of academic and socioeconomic profiles—the majority of them the first in their families to go to college—completing their studies with the Four Pillars of Woodbury education, and transforming them into graduates with highly valued degrees that enable them to compete and thrive in almost any environment. One of the keys to increasing the value of Woodbury “stock” is obtaining the financial resources needed to translate the university’s strategic vision into real achievements by attracting “investors” like the late Ted Kirkendall (Class of 1949). The Kirkendall estate’s $1.5 million unrestricted gift, given in honor of the “Pop” Whitten Heritage Society, is an example of how investment by Woodbury alumni will enable the university to implement a key strategic objective: to transform Woodbury into an important regional university. Over time, this will encompass an expanded presence for Woodbury in the cross-border San Diego/Tijuana metropolitan area. We anticipate programs that will, by 2025, reach some 3,000 students from greater Los Angeles to San Diego and into Latin America. It’s an ambitious vision that promises benefits to the university and to the entire region— one that the Kirkendall estate is helping bring to fruition. Funding Woodbury’s Future Growth
  • 3. 44 It’s the 1960s and Tom Jones (no, not that Tom Jones) is a freshman at the University of Arizona. Things aren’t going as he anticipated. He returns home to Pasadena to develop an alternate plan. His dad’s friend suggests a college in downtown Los Angeles. An institution known as Woodbury that specializes in business administration and design, and from which that friend graduated in the 1930s. Classes are led by professionals in their fields. A practical curriculum and a well-grounded faculty. More action, less theory. That clicks for Tom. And sure enough, after transferring to Woodbury, things started to fall into place. “What I really loved about Woodbury was that my professors worked in the fields in which they taught,” Tom recalls. “They were not academicians. They had a trade and they were passionate about it.” He earned his bachelor’s degree in business from Woodbury in 1968. That collegiate mid-course correction soon paid off. Not long after graduation, Tom was working as a stockbroker for Dean Witter and took a prospective client to meet Jim Gamble, a respected investment advisor, to discuss professional money management. At the end of the meeting, Jim took Tom aside and said he was looking for a bright, industrious young man to join his firm. Tom said he didn’t know how bright he was, but “…40 years later, I’m still here.” So James N. Gamble Investment Counsel became Gamble Jones Investment Counsel and now employs 22 people in offices in Pasadena and Portland, Ore. In time, Tom had three children, Alison (Gamble), T.J., and Ashley (Guerra). Each chose a different university, major, and career, but when their respective careers didn’t pan out as they had hoped, they were given an option to try out Gamble Jones Investment Counsel as a potential workplace. To avoid the kinds of problems that can occur when hiring family members, Jones created a policy. “I said, ‘you can work at Gamble Jones for six months. If, at the end of that time, you decide you don’t like the work or we decide it’s not a good fit, no harm, no foul, we gave it a shot,’” he recalls. All three tried it and it clicked for each of them. “Nepotism has worked very well in our firm,” Jones admits. “All three of my kids left college with different goals and objectives. After working here for six months, they loved it. And here’s the best part: now, I’m the employee and they’re running the company.” Alison has been with the firm for 20 years and is the current president, Ashley for 18, and T.J. for 15. “As it happens, almost all the people who work here had a connection with me or my kids before we interviewed them,” the elder Jones says. “Each is a known quantity before coming on board.” Creating a successful transition from a company founder to the next generation can be a tricky business. According to the Harvard Business Review, 70 percent of family-owned businesses fail or are sold before the second generation gets a chance to take over. Just 10 percent remain active into the third generation. Tom says one key to Gamble Jones’ success is Jim Gamble’s philosophy that family comes first and career comes A Woodbury University Legacy Across the Generations “What I really loved about Woodbury was that my professors worked in the fields in which they taught.” TOM JONES
  • 4. 55 second—but a close second. “If you’re not happy at home, you’re not happy at work and vice versa,” he recounts. “Make sure things are going the way you want them to at home because you can’t make work an excuse for not doing the things you want to with your family.” Tom encouraged his children to try Woodbury as well. Ashley earned her MBA from the School of Business in 2003, and T.J. also attended Woodbury. Alison took a few classes at the university. Alison’s husband, Mark Gamble (who isn’t related to Jim Gamble), earned his MBA at the school in 2003 while Ashley was there. Coincidentally, Mark’s father, Stephen Gamble, was also a Woodbury alumnus. He was student body president in 1955-56, graduated with a degree in journalism in 1956, and was a long-time trustee. As a trustee, Stephen called Woodbury President Wayne Miller in 1985 to say he heard that the Burbank Lutheran High School campus (Villa Cabrini Academy) was for sale. At the board retreat the following day, the Board of Trustees embraced the idea of making the purchase. Thus, Woodbury University moved from downtown Los Angeles to Burbank. After graduating from Woodbury, Tom Jones continued his relationship with the university as a member of the President’s Executive Council. “I’ve always been impressed with what the university has accomplished since it went from a four-story building downtown to a former high school in Burbank,” Jones says. “The growth has been significant, and I’ve always admired the work the Board has done.” T.J. says Woodbury came along in his and his father’s lives at just the right time. “We both had similar struggles, trying to decide who we were as young people,” he recalls. “Woodbury focused us and molded us into who we are and what our family has achieved.” from left to right: T.J. Jones, Ashley Guerra, Tom Jones, Alison Gamble and Mark Gamble. above from left to right: 1. Mark Gamble ‘03, Dr. Kenneth Nielsen, and Harvey Cova 2. Stephen Gamble as a Woodbury student 3. The Jones children: Alison, TJ and Ashley 4. Stephen W. Gamble ‘56 at graduation 5. Alison Jones Gamble and Tom Jones ‘68
  • 5. 6 Brand loyalty, that reflex of buying repeatedly from the same manufacturer, can rightly be seen as the ‘holy grail’ of marketing. But does what works for cars and consumables apply to people—especially entrepreneurs—as well? In Arthur Zenian’s case, perhaps so. Zenian—summa cum laude Business and Management, Class of 2002, former member of the Board of Trustees and current member of the School of Business Advisory Board—embodies a very Woodbury-esque blend of dedication and work ethic. Creating a personal brand has served him well, indeed. Zenian, who also earned a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Cal State Northridge, worked his way through Woodbury as an entrepreneur. He formed his first biomedical company, Strategic Clinical Engineering, in December 1999 with a partner. While at the company, he met a new potential partner, ultimately dissolved Strategic Clinical Engineering, and segued to this new venture. He co- founded that company, Binovia, LLC, in March 2004, which he ran for three and a half years before deciding to move on. In December 2008, he formed enBio Corp., which provides comprehensive biomedical engineering and IT management services for leading hospitals—but this time, without a partner. “I can proudly say this was the best thing I could have done,” Zenian says. “We are a nationwide company based in Burbank, and have a satellite office in Denver. We currently have more than 65 employees and growth is robust.” enBio does business in 11 states and counting: Idaho, Texas, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Alaska, Washington, Florida and Arizona, in addition to California and Colorado. The killer postscript: just about all the clients who knew Zenian from his previous ventures have returned, thanks to his work ethic and “personal brand.” “Personal branding is about making a full-time commitment to define yourself as a leader and recognizing how this will shape the manner in which you serve others,” he says. “Personal branding must be managed with the intention of helping others benefit from having a relationship with you, or by being associated with your work and the industry you serve. It’s a combination of your beliefs, values, talents, and skills.” An inveterate tinkerer, Zenian agrees that what goes around comes around. “Since I was a kid, I loved taking things apart and putting them back together,” he recalls. “I wanted to be a doctor, and I liked both electronics and physiology. So where I’ve ended up is the perfect medium. I get to deal with patients, nurses and doctors. That intense curiosity is what got me into biomed. And then I went on to Woodbury to figure out how to build a business from my passion.” As to which of Woodbury’s Four Pillars—design thinking, entrepreneurship, transdisciplinarity and civic engagement— are most central to his growth, Zenian doesn’t hesitate: “It’s got to be entrepreneurship. Woodbury taught me how to manage, organize, operate a business more effectively and, most of all, how to be a great leader.” Zenian is especially grateful for the chance he got to apply the lessons from a few of his professors’ side businesses to help Binovia and enBio grow. “Learning from the best and being able to use their talent outside of a classroom setting is priceless,” he says. Sometimes, of course, it’s not only what you know but who you know. The connections made on campus can be vital in myriad ways. Case in point: Zenian reconnected three years ago with Michael Murray, a former Woodbury classmate, who is now enBio’s executive vice president. Competing with large players in the biomed equipment management service space—enterprises like GE and Philips—is a challenge, but Zenian contends that customer service is fundamental to carving out a viable niche for his company. “Being there for the customer is key,” he says. “When clients email or call, respond quickly and get it resolved right away, don’t let it linger. That’s what sets us apart from our competitors. Customers know that, at the end of the day, if my team doesn’t take care of business, they can reach me, and they know that I will make sure everything is taken care of. It’s about trust and, yes, personal brand loyalty.” The bond between Zenian and his alma mater remains deep and vibrant: “Woodbury makes you feel like family, not a number, not just a student,” he says. “The university wants you to succeed, prosper and feel right at home.” Arthur Zenian Bringing ‘Personal Brand Loyalty’ to Life “Personal branding is about making a full-time commitment to define yourself as a leader and recognizing how this will shape the manner in which you serve others.” ARTHUR ZENIAN
  • 6. 7 It’s not always easy to keep dreams alive, but it tends to be worth the effort. And when the pursuit of a quality education is behind those dreams, reshaping one’s world is more than possible. That was certainly the case for Cesar Foglio (Woodbury Class of 1964), successful international business executive, a leader in Mexico’s manufacturing sector, and author of the autobiographical memoir, Niccollo Briefly. The son of a Mexican government bureaucrat and engineer, Cesar moved around Mexico with his family throughout the 1940s, eventually settling in Tijuana in the 1950s. The now-bustling border city was a sleepy little town during Foglio’s youth. Cesar was raised in the shadow of the city’s bullring and dreamt of being a bullfighter. Foglio attended high school in nearby San Diego and later studied at San Diego City College. Growing up in a border town, he felt a natural affinity for the import/export business, but realized he needed a more specialized education to get his own venture started. That’s when he learned that Woodbury, then located in downtown Los Angeles, offered a foreign trade major. Cesar Foglio was all in. “What was great about going to Woodbury,” he says, “is that the university helped me get a job while I was studying. I was done with my classes at 1 p.m. and was able to work at the Consulate of Panama. They had a department in charge of export shipping for the Port of San Pedro. I liked working there, and I was getting amazing practical experience on a daily basis.” Still, childhood dreams die hard, and, after graduating from Woodbury in 1964, Foglio, for a time, followed his muse, becoming an apprentice matador, an aficionado practico. It proved not to be quite as glamorous as he’d imagined; as he says, “the difference is that an aficionado practico does not wear a ‘traje de luces’ [suit of lights] as a bullfighter he wears a ‘traje campero’ [country bullfighting suit].” Life took another turn when, soon after, his father passed away. “I had to begin working right away and there were companies in L.A. that offered me a job and a green card as well,” he recalls. “But I never wanted to live in Los Angeles or the United States. I like Mexico even with all its problems. Yet I appreciate the U.S. culture because I had the opportunity to live it as if I was an American. “Unfortunately, I did see discriminatory practices in companies and knew that it was going to be difficult to move up the corporate ladder [in the U.S.],” he says. “At the same time, I never felt discriminated against at Woodbury because it was such a diverse community.” After a brief stint in Mexico City, Foglio took advantage of an opportunity at the first manufacturing company based in Tijuana, which processed and packaged women’s hair products and sent them back to City of Industry. He subsequently worked in Tijuana in the manufacture of transistors, toys, TVs and musical instruments. “Thanks to Woodbury, so many doors opened for me,” he says. “Because of my education, I realized I could go to any company and get the job I wanted. If for some reason, it did not happen, I could always leave to look for another opportunity. “ He swiftly seized those opportunities and became a leader in Tijuana’s manufacturing industry. He emerged as founder and president of the city’s first association of manufacturing industries, which later became a national association. “As the city grew, there were necessities and opportunities for all,” Foglio recounts. “Today, the opportunity is for the bicultural and bilinguals like me. I can say that now after so many years! Being bilingual and bicultural absolutely helped my progress.” And he’s proud of how his alma mater helped him focus his multinational entrepreneurial vision. Says Foglio with satisfaction: “Woodbury is a seminal place to understand what you are studying in relation to other countries and cultures.” Cesar Foglio Transcending Borders - and Manufacturing Success “Thanks to Woodbury, so many doors opened for me. Because of my education, I realized I could go to any company and get the job I wanted.” CESAR FOGLIO
  • 7. 8 A critic once wrote that artist and Woodbury associate professor Patrick Nickell’s sculptures seem to be inspired by “the absent-minded form of drawing called a doodle.” Thanks to an award from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Nickell will have some well-earned time this spring and summer to “doodle” his way to even greater creative heights, and to discover new ways to inspire creativity in the classroom. Nickell enjoys teaching students to apply the fundamental principles and tools of art and design to their chosen field of study. A member of the Design Foundation Department of Woodbury’s School of Media Culture & Design since 2012, Nickell is the first Woodbury faculty member to be selected as a Guggenheim scholar—one of only 178 American scholars, artists and scientists selected from nearly 3,000 applicants to receive the coveted cash award for 2014. Since 1925, the Foundation has granted more than $315 million in fellowships to almost 17,700 individuals—Nobel and poets laureate, Pulitzer Prize winners, and Fields Medal recipients among them. “The resources provided through the Guggenheim Foundation will enable me to take the time I otherwise would not have to explore new directions as a sculptor,” says Nickell, who credits MCD Chairman Edward Clift, Ph.D., and Design Foundation Department chair Doug Post with making it possible for him to use the Guggenheim award to take a temporary leave of his teaching and other duties to study art abroad. “As a teacher, anytime you invest yourself in creative activity, there is bound to be a positive impact in the classroom.” “Patrick is passionate in his belief that a foundation in the arts provides a platform on which Woodbury students can achieve lifelong success, no matter which direction their career may take them,” says Clift. “This is a tremendous opportunity for Patrick, and we look forward to reaping the benefits of his continued contributions as both an artist and an educator.” A native of Van Nuys and resident of Los Angeles, Nickell received a bachelor’s degree in art from Linfield College in 1983 and a master’s in fine arts in sculpture from Claremont Graduate University in 1985. His professional career began with solo exhibitions at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE) in 1988 and Sue Spaid Fine Art in 1991. Throughout the 1990s, his work was exhibited at the Michael Kohn and Kohn Turner galleries in Los Angeles, and with national and international group exhibitions at The Krannert Art Museum (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Curt Marcus Gallery (New York), Galerie Markant (The Netherlands), Galleri Tommy Lund (Odense, Denmark) and the Seattle Center on Contemporary Art. In the late 1990s, Nickell curated two group exhibitions: “Hooked on a Feeling” for the Kohn Turner Gallery and “Blast Off” for Fred Hoffman Fine Art in Santa Monica. A Guggenheim to Woodbury’s Patrick Nickell 8 “As a teacher, anytime you invest yourself in creative activity, there is bound to be a positive impact in the classroom.” PATRICK NICKELL
  • 8. 9 Following a 2002 solo exhibition at Solway Jones Gallery in Los Angeles, Nickell’s work was featured in “Patrick Nickell: built for speed: a sculpture survey,” which chronicled his early work as a sculptor. Initially exhibited at the Luckman Gallery at California State University, Los Angeles, the exhibition traveled to the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art at Utah State University and The University of Texas at San Antonio. The exhibition was nominated by the International Association of Art Critics (AICA) USA Division in the category of “Best University Gallery Exhibition.” In 2004, Nickell was awarded an Artist Resource Completion Grant from the Durfee Foundation. More recently, his work has been featured at Acme Gallery, Los Angeles; the Hales Gallery in London; the University of California at Santa Barbara; the Dust Gallery in Las Vegas; and the Rosamund Felsen Gallery in Santa Monica, which currently represents him. His artwork is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles; the Luckman Fine Arts Gallery; the Laguna Beach Museum of Art; the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art; the Santa Barbara Museum of Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA); and the Berkeley Art Museum at the University of California at Berkeley. Prior to joining Woodbury as a full- time faculty member, Nickell was an adjunct professor at both Woodbury and Otis College of Art and Design and studied at the Rodin Museum in Paris and Meudon, France. Patrick Nickell’s most recent sculpture exhibition was Nov. 22, 2014 – Jan. 3, 2015 at the Rosamund Felsen Gallery in Santa Monica. His drawings will be featured at the Suburban Gallery in Chicago in the fall of 2015. 9 “Patrick is passionate in his belief that a foundation in the arts provides a platform on which Woodbury students can achieve lifelong success, no matter which direction their career may take them.” EDWARD CLIFT
  • 9. 10 Woodbury’s Norman Millar, AIA, Dean of the School of Architecture, has quietly emerged as one of the nation’s leading architectural educators. As if to drive that point home, the Los Angeles Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA|LA) recently honored Millar with its Educator of the Year Award for 2014. Known locally, nationally, and abroad as an innovative practitioner and leading educator in the field of architecture, Millar has been a licensed architect in California, Washington, and Hawaii since 1983. In 1985, he founded Los Angeles-based Norman Millar Architects and has headed architecture programs at Woodbury since 1999. During that period, enrollment has nearly tripled within a host of programs that enable both undergraduate and graduate students to develop technical, theoretical and communications skills while realizing their unique personal design vision. Millar currently serves as outgoing President of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), and his work in partnership with the University of Oregon’s Judith Sheine recently was featured in DWELL Magazine. “Throughout his career at the university, Norman’s talent and experience as a practitioner and vision as an educator has helped literally thousands of young people achieve success in the field of architecture,” said Woodbury president Luís Ma R. Calingo, Ph.D., who announced the award. “His many years of service to the architecture community both at home and abroad make him richly deserving of this recognition.” “Having spent the better part of my career in a part of the country that is replete with fine architecture education programs and talented architects, I am deeply honored to receive this award,” said Millar, who, prior to joining Woodbury, taught at several Los Angeles institutions, including the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), USC, Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, and UCLA. “I look forward to continuing to push the limits of practice and to exploring the endless possibilities of architecture in collaboration with students, faculty and other practitioners.” When Norman Millar, AIA, was asked to become dean of the School of Architecture at Woodbury University a decade ago, the school was small— about 250 students. The program was young and unknown, he recalls, “so we were free to experiment, and I could apply what I had learned from the approaches of other schools.” As Millar recently recounted at professional gatherings in Brussels and Panama City, Woodbury’s approach has succeeded, and then some: the program has more than doubled in size and the quality of graduates is reflected in their jobs, awards, and the graduate schools Woodbury alums attend. Today, the School consists of five undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Architecture & Interior Architecture; five centers and institutes, all incubated within the School of Architecture (two of which have grown beyond it to serve other universities, as well); and three gallery spaces, curated by faculty and students to host local and international designers for exhibitions, workshops, and symposia. The School of Architecture’s curriculum epitomizes a progressive approach to architectural education. Its focus on Criticism, Visualization, Building, Design and Practice has had a transformative effect, creating an environment in which experimentation, competition, collaboration and inspiration coexist. “We take students out of the studio and into the real world through a dedicated program of fieldwork,” Millar says. “Fieldwork takes place both within the complex and fertile region right outside our doors and at diverse locations all around the world—anywhere from Nanking to Istanbul to Buenos Aires. Fieldwork Visionary Leadership in Architecture Education Earns AIA|LA Honors for Dean Norman Millar A Different Way to Build Architectural Education “I look forward to continuing to push the limits of practice and to exploring the endless possibilities of architecture in collaboration with students, faculty and other practitioners.” NORMAN MILLAR
  • 10. 11 readies students for the cultural, economic and physical challenges of contemporary practice in the global economy.” Behind his School’s growth is a philosophy about the profession that is simultaneously aspirational and practical. Aspirational, in that it imbues the undergraduate and graduate experience with exposure to disciplines outside the strict confines of traditional architecture degree programs; practical, in that Woodbury thoughtfully prepares the estimated 50 percent of graduates who choose not to practice architecture once they leave school. “We ask students to write and to argue,” Millar says. “We’re moving beyond architecture as master. We’re now talking about transdisciplinarity, which is where our various centers enter the discussion. Our Arid Lands Institute, which deals with dry land designs and the potential of architects to be a bridge between the science of climate change and policy-making, enables us to demonstrate to cities and states that certain laws need rethinking. We support the infiltration of architects into civic positions where they can affect policy through our Urban Policy Center, or teach architects how to be developers, as in our Real Estate Development for Architects program. The goal is to have a direct and beneficial effect on the built environment.” For Millar, this broader mandate for architecture is part of a lifelong attempt to help more people find their voice—and find joy—in the profession. “I exited architecture school with the intention of making good buildings, and discovered that teaching expanded my passion by fostering it in students,” he says. “Running a school and influencing curriculum expands it even more. Getting involved on the national level and engaging in international conversations magnifies that passion exponentially.” Millar graduated with a Bachelor of Environmental Design degree from the University of Washington and earned a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. He also earned a certificate from The Ross Minority Program at the Lusk Center for Real Estate at USC’s Marshall School of Business. His academic interests include critical practice, alternative practice and urban forestry, and everyday urbanism. In addition to serving on the ACSA board, he has served as a member of several National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) visiting teams, the National Council of Architects Registration Board (NCARB) Licensure Task Force, and is on the executive committee of the California Architectural Foundation. Locally, he serves on the Hollywood Design Review Advisory Board, and the advisory board for the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design.
  • 11. 12 Statements of Financial Position at June 30, 2014 and 2013 2014 2013 ASSETS Cash and cash equivalents $ 313,136 $ 1,579,991 Cash restricted for bond reserve 1,712,592 1,712,658 Investments 20,896,047 18,184,273 Tuition receivable, net 1,918,945 1,722,621 Student loans receivable 1,954,407 1,681,363 Grants receivable 928,442 1,029,181 Pledges receivable, net 461,584 786,522 Other receivables 98,833 74,665 Prepaids, deposits and other assets 2,511,142 2,370,011 Property and equipment, net 43,830,237 44,953,728 Total Assets $ 74,625,365 $ 74,095,013 LIABILITIES AND NET ASSETS Accounts payable $ 419,074 $ 599,707 Accrued expenses and other liabilities 4,843,279 5,998,044 Tuition advances 1,347,394 1,227,698 Student funds payable and student deposits 414,499 347,593 Loans payable 346,447 641,726 Bonds payable 23,140,000 23,710,000 Total liabilities $ 30,520,693 $ 32,524,768 Net Assets Unrestricted Undesignated 1,917,591 2,305,828 Investment in property and equipment 20,086,452 20,602,002 Board-designated endowment 18,612,297 15,947,256 Pension-additional minimum provision (4,973,231) (5,766,127) Total unrestricted 35,643,109 33,088,959 Temporarily restricted 2,669,864 3,469,270 Permanently restricted 5,791,699 5,012,016 Total net assets 44,104,672 41,570,245 Total liabilities and net assets $ 74,625,365 $ 74,095,013
  • 12. 13 Statements of Activities Year Ended June 30, 2014 Unrestricted Temporarily Restricted Permanently Restricted Total Revenues, investment income and reclassifications: Revenues: Tuition and fees $ 48,201,326 - - $ 48,201,326 Less: Institutional student aid (10,959,556) - - (10,959,556) Funded scholarships (354,144) - - (354,144) 36,887,626 - - 36,887,626 Federal and state grants 942,550 - - 942,550 Private gifts and grants 439,903 403,441 750,303 1,593,647 Auxiliary enterprises 1,900,972 - - 1,900,972 Realized and unrealized gains on investments 2,324,158 14,847 - 2,339,005 Interest and dividends 252,209 35,332 26,264 313,805 Other 948,003 - 3,116 951,119 Total revenues and investment income $ 43,695,421 $ 453,620 $ 779,683 $ 44,928,724 Reclassifications: Net assets released from restrictions and redesignated 1,253,026 (1,253,026) - - Total revenues, investment income and reclassifications $ 44,948,447 $ (799,406) $ 779,683 $ 44,928,724 Expenses: Instruction 19,364,473 - - 19,364,473 Academic support 821,955 - - 821,955 Library 1,362,200 - - 1,362,200 Registrar 382,373 - - 382,373 Student services 1,786,119 - - 1,786,119 Institutional support 4,521,760 - - 4,521,760 Campus operations and maintenance 3,730,758 - - 3,730,758 Admissions 1,715,203 - - 1,715,203 University marketing 2,784,131 - - 2,784,131 Data processing 1,123,675 - - 1,123,675 Auxiliary enterprises 1,051,404 - - 1,051,404 Depreciation and amortization 2,879,066 - - 2,879,066 Other 1,664,076 - - 1,664,076 Total Expenses $ 43,187,193 - - $ 43,187,193 Change in net assets before change in additional minimum pension liability 1,761,254 (799,406) 779,683 1,741,531 Change in additional minimum pension liability 792,896 - - 792,896 Change in net assets 2,554,150 (799,406) 779,683 2,534,427 Net assets at beginning of year 33,088,959 3,469,270 5,012,016 41,570,245 Net assets at end of year $ 35,643,109 $ 2,669,864 $ 5,791,699 $ 44,104,672
  • 13. 14 Henry M. Anding, CPA Anonymous (2) Samuel Armstrong ‘73 Prof. Sydney Lawrence Balbes ‘60 Edward W. Blazer ‘59 Lowell K. Bokelman ‘50 Brian and Linda Bowman Roa Brand, VCA ‘62 Donald and Laura Butler Dr. Ellen M. Campbell Gary 1956 and Collene Campbell Mrs. Marilyn L. Cova Drs. James and Hannah Dean Michael Doyle and Dorothy Lucas Doyle Donald A. ‘59 and Joyce Droesch Evelyn Ducoff Mary R. Evry Raymond and Maxine Frankel Theodore J. Fuller ‘71 Patricia A. Gamble Christine A. Gamboa ‘85 Rickey P. Gamore ‘49 Joan Geisbush Russell and Norma Hanlin Carroll H. Hudson ‘38 Frederick P. Hutchirs ‘74 Lynni S. Hutton ‘77 Patricia Barham Inman and James Russell Inman George E. Isaacs ‘52 Joel and Robin Jaffe Dr. Richard and Carol King Ted Kirkendall ‘49 Richard W. Knowles ‘63 Roger L. Kringen Robert and Barbara Kummer Barry and Beverly Kurtz Gregory N. Lippe ‘67 Anna M. McCoach 1964 Linda L. Meinert Mr. Frank T. Murphy, CPA Sandra and Louis Naidorf Richard M. Nordin Myron W. ‘48 and Beth Reed Michael W. Saba ‘71 Dr. Robert A. Schultz Gisela Von Huene Slonneger, VCA ‘63 Ronald E. Soderling ‘57 Jack Solomen ‘56 C. Edward Spiegel ‘60 Mr. and Mrs. Hugo J. Standing Michael J. Sultan ‘70 Judith D. Tamkin ‘49 The Tamkin Foundation William R. ‘69 and L. Elaine Thomas Carolee Toon James ‘64 and Susan Whiting “Pop” Whitten Heritage Society 2014 Fidelem Society 2014 “Pop” Whitten Heritage Society is so named after Woodbury’s sixth President, Ray Howard “Pop” Whitten, known as an innovative educator who left a lasting mark on the University. Friends of Woodbury can share in Pop Whitten’s legacy by leaving gifts from their estates, be it through a will or other planned giving vehicles. If you would like to be included, or if you already include Woodbury University in your will or trust, please contact Michael Seymour, Executive Director of University Relations, for information regarding membership at 818-252-5248. Fidelem is Latin for “faithful friend.” Woodbury University recognizes and honors these most loyal donors. We bring distinction to these individuals and organizations that continuously support Woodbury through sustained annual giving. Membership in the Fidelem Society is granted to donors who have made gifts, at any level, consecutively for at least 5 years or more through December 31, 2014. George K. Aba ‘83 Elsie S. Aromin ‘99 Peter and Hadley Arnold Dr. and Rev. Robert L. Bjorklund Tamara Blok Brian and Linda Bowman Roa Brand Cory Buckner Don A. Carpenter ‘47 Stephen ’68 and Susan Chandler William Y.T. Chow ‘70 Kristy A. Christ Dr. Edward M. Clift George A. Cousins ‘68 Mauro Diaz ‘95 Gertrude A. Dionne Donald C. Dondanville ‘72 John Duffy ‘72 Econolite Control Products, Inc. Anne R. Ehrlich Miguelita V. Fabiosa C. Damon Griffin Burks L. Hamner Marjorie Heller ‘75 Roberta Hyman ‘80 Eddie and Verletta Jackson Seta Javor Liana Jindaryan Crystal E. Johnson ‘08 The Fletcher Jones Foundation Oscar D. Jones ‘07 Takouhie Kabayan Dr. John E. Karayan and Mrs. Anne Karayan James D. ’49 and Jane King Barry and Beverly Kurtz Larsen Fund / Rafina Yussuff Larsen ‘94 Gregory N. Lippe ‘67 Donald R. Loster ‘69 Mabel Wilson Richards Scholarship Foundation Cesar A. Magallon ‘09 Juan R. Martin 1964 Armando Martinez ‘59 Marc E. Martinez Pegi Matsuda ’07 and Larry Haworth Lori McCall Norman R. Millar Danielle E. Miller ‘11 Myron H. Miller ‘76 Kathleen A. Mitchell James A.F. Morse ‘09 John W. Myers, CPA Sandra and Louis Naidorf Jay W. and Rita I. Nickels Richard M. Nordin Patricia Quigley Alexandra Saba Elisabeth Sandberg and Astrid Virding Kathleen H. Schmitt ‘74 Ronald E. Soderling ‘57 Pamela J. Spiszman ‘94 David and Katherine St. Amant Randall Stauffer and Marc Castagnola Jane A. 1956 and Gene F. Swygard Richard S. Takata ‘61 Judith D. Tamkin William R. ’69 and L. Elaine Thomas James R. ‘61 and Valerie J. Urquhart Dr. Andre B. van Niekerk Susan D. Vessella Ingalill Wahlroos-Ritter Charles L. Ward ‘02 Towers Watson Jeanne R. Woodbury Trust Earl C. Wooden ‘56 John E. ’58 and Barbara A. Wortmann
  • 14. 15 Chairman David J. St. Amant President & Chief Operating Officer Econolite Group, Anaheim Vice-Chair & Chair-Elect Lawrence N. Hurwitz Chief Executive Officer Lawrence Financial Group, Los Angeles President Luis Ma. R. Calingo, Ph.D. Woodbury University Chair Emeriti Robert W. Kummer, Jr. Chairman & Chief Executive Officer (retired) Mellon 1st Business Bank Richard King Chairman/Founder King International Group, Pasadena Vice Chair Emeritus Lawrence G. Shoaf, Ph.D. Sr. Vice President Aon Risk Solutions, Newport Beach Members at Large David Blitz President Nebo Capital, Los Angeles Brian B. Bowman Chairman of the Board (retired) Ryan Herco Products Corporation, Burbank Stephen Chandler (Class of 1969) President Chandler Properties, Walnut David F. Cronenbold, Jr. Senior Vice President Lawyers Title Insurance Co., Burbank R. Joseph De Briyn, Esq. Managing Partner Musick, Peeler & Garrett LLP, Los Angeles Jason A. Earnhardt (Class of 2013) Business Management Professional Recent Graduate Trustee Yolanda J. Gorman, Ph.D. President Phillips Graduate Institute, Chatsworth Grace Kim Director of Strategy & Partnerships Goodcorps, Los Angeles Scott Kohno President & Managing Partner Retail Element Consulting, Santa Fe Springs Barry Kurtz, Esq. Attorney at Law Lewitt Hackman, Encino Gregory N. Lippe (Class of 1967) President Gregory N. Lippe Accountancy Corp., Simi Valley Pegi Matsuda (Class of 2007) Senior Vice President Valley Presbyterian Hospital, Van Nuys Malcolm S. McNeil, Esq. Partner Arent Fox LLP, Los Angeles Ilse Metchek President California Fashion Association, Los Angeles WalterW. Mosher, Jr., Ph.D. Founder/Director Precision Dynamics Corp., San Fernando Bruce C. Munster Managing Director & Senior Portfolio Manager Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. Louis M. Naidorf, FAIA Dean Emeritus School of Architecture Curt S. Pringle Former Mayor of Anaheim President Curt Pringle & Associates Ronald E. Soderling (Class of 1957) Owner/Senior Partner RESCO Properties, Newport Beach C. Edward Spiegel (Class of 1960) Chairman Emeritus Managing Partner Cast & Crew Management Corp., Burbank Judith D. Tamkin (Class of 1949) Vice President The Tamkin Foundation, Los Angeles Carl R. Terzian Chairman Carl Terzian Associates, Los Angeles William R. Thomas (Class of 1969) President Thomas Motors, Torrance Eddie S. Y. Wang, AIA President GLC Enterprises LLC, Diamond Bar BOARD OFTRUSTEES
  • 15. 7500 North Glenoaks Boulevard • Burbank, California 91504-1052 2212 Main Street • San Diego, California 92113-3641 woodbury.edu

Related Documents