Naming Ionic Compounds
Part 1: Cations, Anions, and Ionic Bonds
By Shawn P. Shields, Ph.D.
This work is licensed by Shawn ...
What are Ionic Bonds?
Ionic bonds are formed by electrostatic
attractions between oppositely-charged ions
Cations are fo...
Recall: Identifying Metals and Nonmetals
on the Periodic Table
Main Group Metals
Alkali (group 1) and alkaline
earth (group 2) metals
Other main group metals
Hydrogen (H) is
considered ...
Main Group Metals
Metals form cations (positively-charged ions).
Examples:
Sodium cation (Na+) in Group 1
Magnesium ca...
Transition Metals
Transition metals are located in the
center portion of the periodic table
(also called the “d-block”)
Transition Metals
Transition metals form cations (positively-charged
ions).
Most have more than one possible charge for ...
Nonmetals
Nonmetals are generally
found on the right hand
side of the table
Nonmetals in Ionic Compounds
Nonmetals generally form anions (negatively-
charged ions) when in ionic compounds.
Example...
Identifying Metals and Nonmetals on the
Periodic Table
Metalloids
Metalloids
Metalloids (generally) form covalent as opposed to
ionic bonds in compounds.
In particular, compounds compose...
Summary
Metals form cations in ionic compounds.
Cations are positively-charged ions.
When a cation is formed, the atom ...
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Naming ionic compounds intro

Naming ionic compounds intro
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Education      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Naming ionic compounds intro

  • 1. Naming Ionic Compounds Part 1: Cations, Anions, and Ionic Bonds By Shawn P. Shields, Ph.D. This work is licensed by Shawn P. Shields-Maxwell under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
  • 2. What are Ionic Bonds? Ionic bonds are formed by electrostatic attractions between oppositely-charged ions Cations are formed when an atom loses electrons to form a positively-charged ion. (Xn+) Anions are formed when an atom gains electrons to form a negatively-charged ion. (Xn) Ionic bonds are generally formed between metals and nonmetals. +  Recall:
  • 3. Recall: Identifying Metals and Nonmetals on the Periodic Table
  • 4. Main Group Metals Alkali (group 1) and alkaline earth (group 2) metals Other main group metals Hydrogen (H) is considered a nonmetal, even though it is in group 1. H usually forms H+ ions.
  • 5. Main Group Metals Metals form cations (positively-charged ions). Examples: Sodium cation (Na+) in Group 1 Magnesium cation (Mg2+) in Group 2 Aluminum cation (Al3+) in Group 3 Main group metal cations have a positive charge equal to the group number. Hydrogen (H) is considered a nonmetal, even though it is in group 1. H usually forms H+ ions, except when bonded to metals.
  • 6. Transition Metals Transition metals are located in the center portion of the periodic table (also called the “d-block”)
  • 7. Transition Metals Transition metals form cations (positively-charged ions). Most have more than one possible charge for the cation. Examples: Iron: Fe2+ and Fe3+ Copper: Cu+ and Cu2+ Gold: Au+ and Au3+
  • 8. Nonmetals Nonmetals are generally found on the right hand side of the table
  • 9. Nonmetals in Ionic Compounds Nonmetals generally form anions (negatively- charged ions) when in ionic compounds. Examples: Chloride anion (Cl) Oxide anion (O2) Sulfide anion (S2) Nonmetals form covalent, as opposed to ionic, bonds when bonded to other nonmetals. Noble gases (group 8) do not form ions.
  • 10. Identifying Metals and Nonmetals on the Periodic Table Metalloids
  • 11. Metalloids Metalloids (generally) form covalent as opposed to ionic bonds in compounds. In particular, compounds composed from a nonmetal and a metalloid contain covalent bonds.
  • 12. Summary Metals form cations in ionic compounds. Cations are positively-charged ions. When a cation is formed, the atom loses electrons. Nonmetals form anions in ionic compounds. Anions are negatively-charged ions. When an anion is formed, the atom gains electrons. Ionic compounds form between metals and nonmetals. An ionic bond is an electrostatic attraction between oppositely-charged particles (ions).