By:
DrMadhumita Sen
Learning Objectives
 In this lesson the student will learn the basic
components of a natural healthy diet,
 Rules of ...
Medicine?
 Consider the Webster's definition of medicine:
 "The science and art dealing with the maintenance
of healt...
Basic Guidelines
 Natural nutrition begins with assessing which
foods cause harmful reactions in the digestive
system....
The Food Chain
How Does Food Impact Health?
 The food we eat gives our bodies the materials they
need to function properly.
 If we d...
Why has Nutrition Advice Changed?
We can't isolate a nutrient's effect.
 Until recently, nutrition research emphasized...
 A 2003 study published in the American Journal of
Clinical Nutrition found that the beneficial effects of
whole grains...
Dietary Advice
 1. Eat a variety of foods.
 Studies show that people who eat a variety of
food are healthier, live lo...
 Variety also means including an array of foods
within each of these categories.
 For instance whole grains can be who...
 2. Increase fruits and vegetables.
 Scientific data from several studies show that the
higher the consumption of frui...
 Fruits and vegetables are not only full of vitamins
and minerals, but they contain beneficial
phytonutrients.
 A pla...
 Fresh versus frozen?
 Fruits and vegetables processed for freezing tend to be
flash-frozen at their peak ripeness and...
 3. Choose whole grains.
 Data from the Nurse's Health Study shows whole
grains reduce the risk of diabetes and heart ...
 4. Include beneficial fats.
 Our bodies need a balance of two types of fatty acids:
omega 3 and omega 6, but we tend ...
 5. Drink water.
 When concocting a recipe for health, one of the
most important ingredients is water.
 The body is ...
Water keeps skin smooth and
soft, serves as a solvent for
waste, reduces toxicity, and
flushes toxins and excess salt ...
 Include green tea.
 The healthful properties of green tea are primarily
attributed to its potent antioxidant activity...
 A 2008 study published in the American Journal of
Clinical Nutrition found that the green tea
increased fat burning, a...
 7. Control portions.
 While calories are not the whole picture, it has long
been shown that moderate calorie restrict...
 8. Avoid trans-fatty acids.
 Trans-fatty acids are man-made fats, created by
adding hydrogen to vegetable oil in a pr...
 Fats are powerful modulators of cell function, but
because hydrogenation alters the chemistry of the
vegetable oil, it...
 9. Avoid corn syrup and other
artificial sweeteners.
 Evidence is mounting that corn syrup has negative
impacts on h...
 When we eat ordinary sugar, the body produces an
important signaling hormone called leptin that
tells the brain that t...
 10. Limit processed foods.
 A common recommendation for healthy eating is
to shop around the perimeter of the superma...
How nutrients interact
with genes
 One of the breakthrough concepts from the Human
Genome Project is that "genes in an...
 An advancing area of study called Nutrigenomics
looks at how different foods may interact with
specific genes to modif...
Epigenetics
 One study showed that participants who consumed a
diet of whole rye (low-insulin-response) experienced
ch...
 Issues of mercury contamination
 In Eat Drink and be Healthy, Walter Willett
discusses issues of contamination in cer...
Changes in Food
 "To fight a disease after it has occurred is like
trying to dig a well when one is thirsty or
forging...
The eight principles of food and health
 1. Nutrition represents the combined activities of
countless food substances. ...
 5. Nutrition can substantially control the adverse
effects of noxious chemicals.
 6. The same nutrition that prevents...
Mindful Matters
 Besides breathing and sleeping, eating is life's most
vital activity.
 We cannot sustain ourselves w...
We seem to have forgotten that eating is
necessary to our body functions.
 Food gives us energy, and allows us to thin...
Why is mindfulness important?
 If we begin to pay attention to how specific foods
impact our body, we can start to make...
Stress Impacts our Digestion
 When our bodies perceive a threat, our bodies
move into a state of readiness, a chemical ...
 Pupils dilate, Blood pressure rises,
 Digestion is suppressed
 Immunity is suppressed, Detoxification is suppressed ...
 When the body is in the midst
of fighting or fleeing, it
essentially puts the digestive
system on hold.
 After all,...
Mindful eating
 Paying attention while eating assures full
digestion as well as full nutritional benefit.
 There is a...
 In this phase, the brain informs the stomach that it
should prepare for a meal by initiating a number of
digestive act...
How to eat mindfully
 Eating a mindful meal means completely focusing
your mind on the 'process' of eating.
 When you...
 Strategy 1
 Choose a specific location to eat,
such as your table or the lunchroom
at work.
 Sit quietly. Don't ge...
 Strategy 2
 Slow down the process of eating is to challenge the
way you have always done it.
 For example, try eati...
Food and the Environment
 Are we killing the environment or
is it killing us?
 When we look at what we eat and
how w...
 All humans demand cheap food, so our
agricultural policy for the past 50 years has focused
on providing large amounts ...
The impact of environmental toxins
 Pesticides and herbicides are environmental
toxins, known as xenobiotics.
 Xenobi...
 One group of xenobiotics is made up of
environmental estrogens, referred to as
xenoestrogens, which mimic animal hormo...
 A 2006 study of these environmental
xenoestrogens showed male fish that express
female characteristics, turtles that a...
 In humans, xenoestrogens mimic the effect of
human estrogens because they have a chemical
structure that allows them t...
How does the environment
impact our food?
 The US Department of Agriculture has been tracking
the nutritional quality ...
 The Environmental Protection Agency's Report on
Environmental Pollution and Disease indicates that
some common disease...
How our bodies handle
toxins
Humans are at the top of the
food chain.
 Because of this, we are generally
not expos...
How you can feed the
detoxification system
 You can increase the ability of the body to convert
toxins to non-toxic su...
 Eat celery-an "unassuming" but powerful
detoxifying food that provides phytonutrients that
benefit the liver's ability...
Add legumes, such as black beans,
chickpeas, and lentils as soluble fiber to aid
in elimination.
 Increase protein in...
 Foods to avoid or minimize as they add to the
toxic load or burden of the detoxification
system:
 Avoid processed fo...
Discretionary Calories
 Keeping to a healthy eating plan means
accommodating individual tastes, likes and
dislikes so ...
 These calories are the “extras” that can be
used on luxuries like solid fats, added
sugars, and alcohol, or on more fo...
Physical Activity
 Physical activity and nutrition work together for better
health. Being active increases the amount o...
Key Points
 A healthy eating plan is easy to make so long as the
following points are considered:
 Fresh, local and s...
Homework
 Make a diet chart for a 12 year old girl who is
mostly sedentary but not overweight.
 Mention calcium and i...
Thank You!
Natural nutrition
Natural nutrition
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Natural nutrition

Nutrition is one of the most important health and lifestyle factors in the determination of health and disease today. This slideshow is about a forgotten way to approach nutrition.
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Healthcare      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - Natural nutrition

  • 1. By: DrMadhumita Sen
  • 2. Learning Objectives  In this lesson the student will learn the basic components of a natural healthy diet,  Rules of recommending diets  How diets affect the body and mind.
  • 3. Medicine?  Consider the Webster's definition of medicine:  "The science and art dealing with the maintenance of health and the prevention, alleviation, or cure of disease."  FOOD acts as medicine, to maintain, prevent, and treat disease.
  • 4. Basic Guidelines  Natural nutrition begins with assessing which foods cause harmful reactions in the digestive system.  A diet based on whole, natural foods is advised.  Natural nutrition encourages eating locally grown organic foods and foods lowest on the food chain, as well as eating slowly to improve digestion.  The food should also be enjoyed – mindfulness in eating is as important as the nutrition in the food.
  • 5. The Food Chain
  • 6. How Does Food Impact Health?  The food we eat gives our bodies the materials they need to function properly.  If we don't get the right nutrition, our metabolic processes suffer and our health declines. 1. Meet the needs for vitamins, minerals and other nutrients. 2. Reduce risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, certain types of cancer and osteoporosis. 3. Contribute to overall health and vitality.
  • 7. Why has Nutrition Advice Changed? We can't isolate a nutrient's effect.  Until recently, nutrition research emphasized the role of single nutrients acting as a magic bullet to miraculously prevent disease or, conversely, as the sole agent responsible for the development of disease.  During the past five years, however, research is uncovering the concept of food synergy; which is the additive influence of multiple nutrients or food patterns.
  • 8.  A 2003 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that the beneficial effects of whole grains might be more profound than any single nutrient contained therein.  A 2007 study published in Circulation found that it was the synergy of fish, fruits, and vegetables that led to a reduced risk of blood clots.  In other words, it is not the effect of one nutrient that leads to health, but a person's overall diet.
  • 9. Dietary Advice  1. Eat a variety of foods.  Studies show that people who eat a variety of food are healthier, live longer, and have a reduced risk of diseases, such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes.  Food variety means including foods such as fruit, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, meat, fish, seafood, nuts and seeds, and dairy products.
  • 10.  Variety also means including an array of foods within each of these categories.  For instance whole grains can be whole wheat, wild rice, oats, rye, or barley.  Because certain nutrients are present in particular foods, eating a variety of different foods allows you to get a variety of nutrients.  Variety means that you will include protein, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals, phytonutrients, and fiber in the diet.
  • 11.  2. Increase fruits and vegetables.  Scientific data from several studies show that the higher the consumption of fruit and vegetables, the lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease, including stroke (American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2008).  Naturopathy recommends five to thirteen servings of fruits and vegetables a day, depending on caloric intake.  A serving is one piece of fruit, ½ cup of vegetable, 1 cup of salad greens, or ½ cup of juice.
  • 12.  Fruits and vegetables are not only full of vitamins and minerals, but they contain beneficial phytonutrients.  A plant cannot flee or fight so it is equipped with "phyto," or plant, “nutrients” that can defend against disease, blight, radiation, weather, insects, and anything that may threaten its survival.  When we eat these plants, we also benefit from the protection of the phytonutrients.  Phytonutrient content is indicated by the colour of the food. To get a variety of phytonutrients, aim for five colours a day.
  • 13.  Fresh versus frozen?  Fruits and vegetables processed for freezing tend to be flash-frozen at their peak ripeness and nutrient density. Freezing locks in plant nutrients.  Fresh fruits and vegetables that are transported to other states are generally picked before they are ripe, which gives them less time to develop optimal levels of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.  The solution is to buy locally grown fruits and vegetables that have travelled the least amount of distance to the table whenever possible and supplement that with frozen products.
  • 14.  3. Choose whole grains.  Data from the Nurse's Health Study shows whole grains reduce the risk of diabetes and heart disease and improve the health of the gastrointestinal tract.  Whole grains contain multiple nutrients.  60% of calcium, 85% of magnesium, 77% of potassium, 78% of zinc  75% of vitamins  95% of fatty acids  95% of fiber
  • 15.  4. Include beneficial fats.  Our bodies need a balance of two types of fatty acids: omega 3 and omega 6, but we tend to get too much omega 6.  Omega 6: Omega 3 = 1:1.  Plant oils, such as avocado, olive oil, canola oil, flaxseed oil, oils from nuts and seeds, and fats from fish whose diet is made up of algae contain a predominance of omega 3 and 6 fatty acids and have an anti-inflammatory effect on the body.
  • 16.  5. Drink water.  When concocting a recipe for health, one of the most important ingredients is water.  The body is made up of up to 65 percent water. The brain is composed of 70 percent water and the lungs are 90 percent water.  A whopping 83 percent of the blood is water. Water is needed for the digestion, absorption, and transportation of nutrients.
  • 17. Water keeps skin smooth and soft, serves as a solvent for waste, reduces toxicity, and flushes toxins and excess salt from the body.  It also regulates body temperature and is useful in managing hunger.  Sometimes the cue for thirst is confused as a cue for food.
  • 18.  Include green tea.  The healthful properties of green tea are primarily attributed to its potent antioxidant activity and polyphenols called catechins. The most active of these polyphenols in green tea is called epigallocatechin (EGCG).  Numerous studies have shown an association between green tea and protection against cancer, including breast, colon and esophageal cancer.  Green tea has also been used for improving mental alertness, aiding in weight loss, protecting skin from sun damage, and lowering cholesterol.
  • 19.  A 2008 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that the green tea increased fat burning, as well as improved insulin sensitivity and glucose control during moderate exercise.  Generally, two to three cups of green tea daily is the recommended intake for the most benefit.  When steeping green tea, it is recommended that you use hot water (185 degrees) rather than boiling hot water (212 degrees).  Boiling water will "cook" the tea leaves and create a bitter tasting tea.
  • 20.  7. Control portions.  While calories are not the whole picture, it has long been shown that moderate calorie restriction is a way to slow the aging process.  A 2006 Clinical Interventions in Aging article on delaying age-related disease recommended, on the basis of current research, a diet low in calories and saturated fats and high in whole grains, legumes, and fruits and vegetables - all of which maintain lean body weight.
  • 21.  8. Avoid trans-fatty acids.  Trans-fatty acids are man-made fats, created by adding hydrogen to vegetable oil in a process called hydrogenation.  Hydrogenation is favoured by manufacturers because it increases shelf-life and adds stability to foods.  When a trans-fat is eaten, the body recognizes it as a fat and uses the trans-fat for function just like any other fatty acid.
  • 22.  Fats are powerful modulators of cell function, but because hydrogenation alters the chemistry of the vegetable oil, it is less effective as a fat.  Trans-fatty acids can affect function and responses of many cell types.  They have been shown to cause endothelial dysfunction, raise LDL, lower HDL, increase triglycerides, and promote inflammation (New England Journal of Medicine, 2006).
  • 23.  9. Avoid corn syrup and other artificial sweeteners.  Evidence is mounting that corn syrup has negative impacts on health.  Researchers, from Rutgers University, found "astonishingly high" levels of reactive compounds (called carbonyls) in the soft drinks containing high fructose corn syrup.  The compounds, associated with "unbound" fructose and glucose molecules, are believed to trigger cell and tissue damage.
  • 24.  When we eat ordinary sugar, the body produces an important signaling hormone called leptin that tells the brain that the body is full and hence controls our eating.  But when we eat high fructose corn syrup, we don't produce leptin and don't get a signal to stop.  It is best to avoid or limit soft drinks, including diet soda.  A study published in Circulation (2008) found a 34 percent increase in risk for metabolic syndrome in subjects who consumed diet soda.
  • 25.  10. Limit processed foods.  A common recommendation for healthy eating is to shop around the perimeter of the supermarket, where the fresh, natural, non-processed foods tend to be.  A farmers' market is the best place for fresh produce.  Other options are food co-ops, natural food stores, or farm shares.
  • 26. How nutrients interact with genes  One of the breakthrough concepts from the Human Genome Project is that "genes in and of themselves do not create disease.”  Only when they are plunged into a harmful environment unique to the individual do they create the outcome of disease.
  • 27.  An advancing area of study called Nutrigenomics looks at how different foods may interact with specific genes to modify the risk of common chronic diseases such as Type II diabetes, obesity, heart disease, stroke and certain cancers.  Nutrigenomics also seeks to identify the molecules in the diet that affect health by altering the expression of genes. (For example, by triggering the genes that start the onset of Type II diabetes.)
  • 28. Epigenetics  One study showed that participants who consumed a diet of whole rye (low-insulin-response) experienced changes in their gene expression that reduced their risk of developing diabetes.  Participants who consumed a wheat-potato (high insulin response) diet experienced the opposite-a change in their gene expression that increased their risk.  We cannot change our genes, but we can change the environment which impacts how our genes manifest.  One important component of this environment is food.
  • 29.  Issues of mercury contamination  In Eat Drink and be Healthy, Walter Willett discusses issues of contamination in certain fish.  He says that farm-raised fish are less likely to be contaminated by mercury and other toxins, but they may not be as high in omega 3 fatty acids, depending on what they have been fed.  "If the fish are fed other fish or algae they will have a higher content of omega 3 fatty acids, but if they are fed wheat and corn they won't contain much."
  • 30. Changes in Food  "To fight a disease after it has occurred is like trying to dig a well when one is thirsty or forging a weapon once a war has begun." The Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine, The Nei Ching, c. 1000 B.C.  In The China Study, T. Colin Campbell and Thomas M. Campbell present a clear and concise message: if you want to be healthy, change your diet.  The authors summarize their findings in the Eight Principles of Food and Health.
  • 31. The eight principles of food and health  1. Nutrition represents the combined activities of countless food substances. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.  2. Solely taking vitamin supplements is not the way to good health.  3. There are virtually no nutrients in animal-based foods that are not better provided by plants.  4. Genes do not determine diseases on their own. Genes function only by being activated or expressed, and nutrition plays a critical role in determining which genes, good and bad, are expressed.
  • 32.  5. Nutrition can substantially control the adverse effects of noxious chemicals.  6. The same nutrition that prevents disease in its early stages (before diagnosis) can also halt or reverse disease in later stages (after diagnosis).  7. Nutrition that is truly beneficial for one chronic disease will support health across the board.  8. Good nutrition creates health in all areas of our existence. All parts are interconnected.
  • 33. Mindful Matters  Besides breathing and sleeping, eating is life's most vital activity.  We cannot sustain ourselves without eating.  In hunter-gatherer times, finding and eating food was a matter of survival.  Many hours of the day were spent in the pursuit and eating of food.  In the modern world, much of the hunting and gathering is done for us. Very few hours (or, for some people, minutes) are spent gathering, preparing, or eating food.
  • 34. We seem to have forgotten that eating is necessary to our body functions.  Food gives us energy, and allows us to think, move, and prosper.  But we are no longer attentive to the impact of food on our functioning. The idea of being consumers of food has switched to that of being food "consumers," in a marketing sense. We don't always pick foods based on what our bodies need for optimal wellness. We eat for convenience, not health.
  • 35. Why is mindfulness important?  If we begin to pay attention to how specific foods impact our body, we can start to make better choices about what foods to buy and eat.  For example, we are tempted in the supermarket to buy one of the sweet cereals for breakfast.  But with this, we may become hungry a few hours after breakfast.  On the other hand, eating eggs and toast for breakfast will mean we are not so hungry later, and don't crave sugar.
  • 36. Stress Impacts our Digestion  When our bodies perceive a threat, our bodies move into a state of readiness, a chemical version of "code red."  This is called the "fight or flight response," also known as the stress response. In this state, the following processes occur:  Sympathetic nervous system stimulated  Parasympathetic nervous system is over-ridden
  • 37.  Pupils dilate, Blood pressure rises,  Digestion is suppressed  Immunity is suppressed, Detoxification is suppressed  Long term, it also causes:  Gradual demineralization of bone  Impairment of fatty acid metabolism, Glucose released, Cholesterol released, Hormones deranged  Decreased energy , Mood fluctuations,  Inflammatory mediators stimulated
  • 38.  When the body is in the midst of fighting or fleeing, it essentially puts the digestive system on hold.  After all, if you are being chased by a saber-toothed tiger, it isn't really the time to stop and eat.  Because the digestive system is shut down, fewer digestive enzymes are released.
  • 39. Mindful eating  Paying attention while eating assures full digestion as well as full nutritional benefit.  There is an initial phase of digestion called the cephalic phase that occurs before we actually start to eat.  An example of the cephalic phase happens when you smell bread baking.  Anticipating the delicious flavor of the freshly baked bread causes the mouth to water, preparing one to eat the bread.
  • 40.  In this phase, the brain informs the stomach that it should prepare for a meal by initiating a number of digestive activities.  The body begins to prepare for the breaking down and absorption of nutrients.  Salivation is activated and pancreatic enzymes and stomach acids are released.  The conveyer belt that is the digestive tract begins its rhythmic movement so that nutrients can be absorbed and moved along.  It is estimated that as much as 30 to 40 percent of the total digestive response to any meal is due to the cephalic phase.
  • 41. How to eat mindfully  Eating a mindful meal means completely focusing your mind on the 'process' of eating.  When you take time to experience your food through all your senses; taste (flavor), smell (aroma), sight (presentation) sound (of surroundings), and touch (movement of utensils and the feel of the food)," they suggest, "you are likely to be truly nourished.”
  • 42.  Strategy 1  Choose a specific location to eat, such as your table or the lunchroom at work.  Sit quietly. Don't get up, and don't answer the phone.  Have all the food you intend to eat on the table in front of you before starting.  To be mindful you must give your full attention to your eating.  You must focus on the process of eating and enjoying your meal.
  • 43.  Strategy 2  Slow down the process of eating is to challenge the way you have always done it.  For example, try eating using a pair of chopsticks/fork instead of your customary utensils.  This will force you to take smaller portions, eat more slowly, and look at your food more closely.
  • 44. Food and the Environment  Are we killing the environment or is it killing us?  When we look at what we eat and how we grow it, we find extensive evidence for damage both to our food (from pollution and soil depletion) and to our environment (from the toxicity of growing foods industrially).
  • 45.  All humans demand cheap food, so our agricultural policy for the past 50 years has focused on providing large amounts of inexpensive calories.  Two of the cheapest sources of calories are rice and soy, which make up a large percentage of our caloric intake today.  But growing just one crop consistently (a monoculture) depletes the soil and forces farmers to use greater amounts of pesticides and fertilizers.
  • 46. The impact of environmental toxins  Pesticides and herbicides are environmental toxins, known as xenobiotics.  Xenobiotics include not only pesticides and herbicides, but plastics (bisphenol A), surfactants used in food packaging, household chemicals, industrial chemicals (PCBs and dioxins), and heavy metals (lead, mercury, and cadmium).  These products have been shown to have a negative impact on animal health.
  • 47.  One group of xenobiotics is made up of environmental estrogens, referred to as xenoestrogens, which mimic animal hormones and act as endocrine system disrupters  They are in our food, our water, and our air.  Once in our body, they are not easily broken down.  Xenoestrogens have been associated with developmental issues and reproductive health problems in wild life and laboratory animals.
  • 48.  A 2006 study of these environmental xenoestrogens showed male fish that express female characteristics, turtles that are sex reversed, and male frogs with multiple ovaries.  Researchers have also documented seals with an excess of uterine fibroids and salmon with enlarged thyroids.
  • 49.  In humans, xenoestrogens mimic the effect of human estrogens because they have a chemical structure that allows them to fit into estrogen receptor sites.  But once there, they cause issues. According to a 2006 study, they can prevent normal hormone binding to hormone receptors, influence cell signaling pathways, and increase cell division.  Xenoestrogens are just one example of how pesticides and other toxins that humans use in food production are impacting our environment and our health.
  • 50. How does the environment impact our food?  The US Department of Agriculture has been tracking the nutritional quality of produce since the 1950s and has seen a steady decline.  According to Brian Halwell, a researcher, vitamin C has declined by 20 percent, iron by 15 percent, riboflavin by 38 percent, and calcium by 16 percent.  So we are now getting less nutrition per calorie in our foods. In essence, we have to eat more food to get the same vitamin and mineral content.
  • 51.  The Environmental Protection Agency's Report on Environmental Pollution and Disease indicates that some common diseases and conditions may be strongly linked to environmental exposure:  asthma, autism, breast and other cancers,  lung disease,  Parkinson's disease, and  conditions associated with reproductive health.
  • 52. How our bodies handle toxins Humans are at the top of the food chain.  Because of this, we are generally not exposed to a single toxin at a time, but to a complex mixture of toxins.  It is largely unknown how these multiple toxins interact with one another and what their cumulative effects might be.
  • 53. How you can feed the detoxification system  You can increase the ability of the body to convert toxins to non-toxic substances and to eliminate toxins by doing the following:  Drink extra water.  Consume a balanced diet of whole foods, colourful fruits and vegetables, such as broccoli, squash, blueberries, citrus, beets, artichokes, pomegranate, and carrots.  These foods are filled with phytonutrients and have been shown to boost detoxification.
  • 54.  Eat celery-an "unassuming" but powerful detoxifying food that provides phytonutrients that benefit the liver's ability to detoxify.  Include the foods containing antioxidants (vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and selenium)  Add whole grains, such as brown rice, quinoa, and oats to aid elimination.
  • 55. Add legumes, such as black beans, chickpeas, and lentils as soluble fiber to aid in elimination.  Increase protein intake from sources like soy, eggs, nuts, and seeds. Proteins make enzymes which also help in digestion and detoxification.  Include adequate B vitamins. B-vitamins are needed for the initiation of the detoxification system.  Include probiotics to promote gut health.
  • 56.  Foods to avoid or minimize as they add to the toxic load or burden of the detoxification system:  Avoid processed foods containing additives and preservatives  Avoid artificial sweeteners and corn syrup  Avoid hydrogenated vegetable oil  Minimize red meats, sugar salt, caffeine, and nicotine.  Reduce refined or non-whole grain products  Reduce alcohol consumption and tobacco.
  • 57. Discretionary Calories  Keeping to a healthy eating plan means accommodating individual tastes, likes and dislikes so that healthy eating doesn't become tiresome.  MyPyramid says a certain amount of discretionary calories can be moved around to accommodate individual snacks and off-plan items so the eating plan won't be sabotaged by any one variant.
  • 58.  These calories are the “extras” that can be used on luxuries like solid fats, added sugars, and alcohol, or on more food from any food group. They are “discretionary calories.”  Most discretionary calorie allowances are very small, between 100 and 300 calories, especially for those who are not physically active.  Remember, discretionary calories provide you with extra calories, but nothing else. Taking in extra calories and not offsetting them by being more physically active, will result in weight gain.
  • 59. Physical Activity  Physical activity and nutrition work together for better health. Being active increases the amount of calories burned. Inactivity makes it difficult to reach and maintain a healthy body weight.  Most adults need at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each day. This is in addition to your usual daily activities.  Children and teenagers should be physically active for at least 60 minutes every day, or most days.
  • 60. Key Points  A healthy eating plan is easy to make so long as the following points are considered:  Fresh, local and seasonal foods  More fresh fruits and vegetables  Variety in the diet  Happiness and mindfulness while eating  Include exercise in the diet plan!  Discretionary calories to prevent craving.
  • 61. Homework  Make a diet chart for a 12 year old girl who is mostly sedentary but not overweight.  Mention calcium and iron rich foods.  Include an exercise plan in your dietary advice.
  • 62. Thank You!

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