11/15/15, 9:02 PMA look at comics past, present and future on National Comic Book Day - The University Daily Kansan: Arts ...
11/15/15, 9:02 PMA look at comics past, present and future on National Comic Book Day - The University Daily Kansan: Arts ...
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National comic book day

A look at comics on National Comic Book Day
Published on: Mar 3, 2016
Published in: Art & Photos      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - National comic book day

  • 1. 11/15/15, 9:02 PMA look at comics past, present and future on National Comic Book Day - The University Daily Kansan: Arts And Culture Page 1 of 2http://www.kansan.com/arts_and_culture/a-look-at-comics-past-present-and-f…-on-national/article_91687730-63d2-11e5-ad18-d706acda1131.html?mode=print A look at comics past, present and future on National Comic Book Day Madi Schulz l @Mad_Dawgg | Posted: Friday, September 25, 2015 5:12 pm Before Spiderman was swinging across movie theater screens, before Batman and the Joker’s rivalry was brought to life, before the Avengers were among the highest grossing movies of all time, the characters started out with stories told in bright colors in small boxes. Sept. 25 is National Comic Book day, and it's safe to say that comics have provided the world with some of the most well known stories of all time. Superman, perhaps the most famous superhero, was created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in 1938. Other popular superheroes followed including Captain Marvel and Captain America, who gained popularity during the Second World War, according to .PBS Tanner Willbanks, employee at Lawrence’s Astrokitty Comics & More, located on 7th and New Hampshire streets, said there are multiple reasons why people love comic books. “If you’re talking about the superhero [comics], they’re what kids grow up on,” he said. “They’re these great overarching metaphors for all sorts of things. You get the bright colors; they tell stories in a way that you can’t really get in any other medium.” But that’s not to say Willbanks overlooks the other genres. “You are able to tell stories that maybe wouldn’t be accepted in any other media, but can be told in other ways that defy expectations,” he said. Willbanks gave the example of a comic titled “Bitch Planet,” in which women subverting the social expectation of society are sent to a prison planet — a concept that might not be picked up for television and would lack the colorful visuals in a traditional book. A recent exciting addition to comic books is Ms. Marvel. Released in 2015, this comic is about a 16-year- old Pakistani girl named Kamala Khan who, because she is Muslim, chooses to remain covered even when she transforms into her superhero alter ego. This follows Marvel’s efforts to diversify the comic books in its line-up. "[Marvel] has said she's going to be the Peter Parker for the new generation, which is huge that both Marvel is putting a lot of publicity behind a female-led book, plus it's about a female, person of color, who also happens to be a religious minority," Willbanks said.
  • 2. 11/15/15, 9:02 PMA look at comics past, present and future on National Comic Book Day - The University Daily Kansan: Arts And Culture Page 2 of 2http://www.kansan.com/arts_and_culture/a-look-at-comics-past-present-and-f…-on-national/article_91687730-63d2-11e5-ad18-d706acda1131.html?mode=print — Edited by Rebeka Luttinger

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