John Fischer, MassDEP
April 8, 2014
1
Policy Framework and Goals
 Solid Waste Master Plan
 Overall goal – reduce disposal by 2 million tons (30 %)
annually by...
Why focus on food waste/organics?
 Food waste and other organics >25% of disposal in
Mass. > 1 million tons per year
 20...
Benefits
 Opportunity to digest for energy and/or compost to
produce soil amendments/fertilizers
 Management solutions f...
Organics Action Plan Overview
 Comprehensive, integrated set of strategies
 Developed working with stakeholders
 Focuse...
Current Status/Progress to Date
 Estimate baseline 100,000 tons of food waste diversion
 Composting – farms and small co...
Improved Data
 Food waste density mapping study – updated 2011
 Waste characterization studies – food waste summary
avai...
Building Collection Infrastructure
 Guidance on food waste reduction/donation
 Best management practices guidance
 By b...
Food Waste Collection BMPs
 Cover:
 Kitchen (back of the house) separation
 Hauler collection practices/frequency
 Out...
Technical Assistance to Generators
 RecyclingWorks in Massachusetts
 Website
 Service provider database
 Guidance/fact...
Growing Processing
Capacity/Markets
 Solid waste regulations siting changes
 Promulgated November 2012
 Clarify require...
Market Development
 Financial assistance matrix available online
 MassDEP Recycling Loan Fund
 MassDEP Municipal Grants...
13
What are the “waste bans” ?
 Waste bans are restrictions on the disposal, or transfer
for disposal, of certain hazardo...
14
What are the “waste bans” cont…
Purpose:
 Conserve capacity at existing disposal facilities
 Minimize the need for ne...
15
What are the “waste bans” cont…
Who do they apply to?
310 CMR 19.017(3)(a): “No person shall dispose,
transfer for disp...
MassDEP Waste Ban Compliance
Strategy
 Increased inspections and enforcement
 101 enforcement actions through January 20...
17
Banned Material Categories *
 Zero Tolerance Items
 Lead Acid Batteries
 Cathode Ray Tubes
 White Goods (large appl...
18
Banned Materials –
Action Level Items
- Recyclable Paper (20% or more) – will change to 10%
- Glass, Metal, Plastic Con...
Cardboard
Paper
Bottles and Cans
Leaves and Yard Waste
Commercial Organics Waste Ban
 Will take effect October 1, 2014
 Food waste and vegetative material
 Does not apply to ...
Food Waste Generators
24
Waste Ban Development
 Waste bans monitored/enforced @ solid waste
facilities
 Would update/modify waste ban guidance fo...
Contact Information
www.mass.gov/dep/public/committee/swacorg.htm
www.mass.gov/dep/recycle/reduce/commorg.htm
http://www.m...
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POLICY2 Organics Waste Ban Action Plan, John Fischer

Presentation by John Fischer, MassDEP, on the coming MA Commercial Waste Ban on Organic Waste, as well as other changes to Waste Ban Regulations.
Published on: Mar 4, 2016
Published in: Government & Nonprofit      Business      Technology      
Source: www.slideshare.net


Transcripts - POLICY2 Organics Waste Ban Action Plan, John Fischer

  • 1. John Fischer, MassDEP April 8, 2014 1
  • 2. Policy Framework and Goals  Solid Waste Master Plan  Overall goal – reduce disposal by 2 million tons (30 %) annually by 2020  Reduce disposal by 80% by 2050  Primary Goal – Divert additional 350,000 tons per year of organic materials from disposal by 2020  Clean Energy Results Program  Support the development of renewable energy in Mass.  Goal to have 50 MW of anaerobic digestion in place by 2020 2
  • 3. Why focus on food waste/organics?  Food waste and other organics >25% of disposal in Mass. > 1 million tons per year  2011 MSW disposal = 4.9 million tons  Food waste estimated 15% of MSW disposal  Compostable paper 6 % of MSW disposal 3
  • 4. Benefits  Opportunity to digest for energy and/or compost to produce soil amendments/fertilizers  Management solutions for dairy manure & wastewater residuals  Opportunity to generate energy at farms, waste water plants, other locations  Cost effective materials management for businesses/institutions  Reduced reliance on disposal capacity 4
  • 5. Organics Action Plan Overview  Comprehensive, integrated set of strategies  Developed working with stakeholders  Focused on 2020 goal – 350 K tons additional diversion annually  Data Analysis  Collection Infrastructure  Processing Capacity/Market Development  Regulatory Reform/Waste Ban 5
  • 6. Current Status/Progress to Date  Estimate baseline 100,000 tons of food waste diversion  Composting – farms and small commercial sites – about 30 locations  Pig farms/animal feed  On-site systems  Estimated 1,400 businesses/institutions now diverting food waste – includes 300 supermarkets  Growth in organics hauling services 6
  • 7. Improved Data  Food waste density mapping study – updated 2011  Waste characterization studies – food waste summary available online – 2013 data available this spring  Completed survey of food waste management at state facilities  Sector based estimates on RecyclingWorks web site 7
  • 8. Building Collection Infrastructure  Guidance on food waste reduction/donation  Best management practices guidance  By business sector  For local health departments/haulers  Recycling Loan Fund – haulers eligible  Residential/small business collection pilot programs 8
  • 9. Food Waste Collection BMPs  Cover:  Kitchen (back of the house) separation  Hauler collection practices/frequency  Outside storage practices  Expect to change and update over time as needed  Available on RecyclingWorks web site 9
  • 10. Technical Assistance to Generators  RecyclingWorks in Massachusetts  Website  Service provider database  Guidance/fact sheets/case studies  Site specific TA  WasteWise and other workshops  Assistance to targeted sectors  Supermarkets  Hotels/large restaurants  Colleges/universities  State facilities  Food manufacturers/processors 10
  • 11. Growing Processing Capacity/Markets  Solid waste regulations siting changes  Promulgated November 2012  Clarify requirements, reduce siting barriers  Exempt very small operations/activities  Facilities taking source separated materials do not require solid waste facility site assignment  Either general permit or facility permit based on type & size  Required best management practices  Allow waste water plants to accept food waste to AD w/o being solid waste facility 11
  • 12. Market Development  Financial assistance matrix available online  MassDEP Recycling Loan Fund  MassDEP Municipal Grants  Mass Clean Energy Center Organics to Energy program  Recent net metering changes  Other funding sources can be leveraged  Siting facilities on state property  Use state contracts as opportunity to build demand  Marketing workshops 12
  • 13. 13 What are the “waste bans” ?  Waste bans are restrictions on the disposal, or transfer for disposal, of certain hazardous and recyclable wastes at solid waste facilities in Massachusetts  Started in 1991  A cornerstone of Massachusetts solid waste policy 310 CMR 19.017(3)(a): “No person shall dispose, transfer for disposal, or contract for disposal of the restricted material…”
  • 14. 14 What are the “waste bans” cont… Purpose:  Conserve capacity at existing disposal facilities  Minimize the need for new facility construction  Support the recycling industry by ensuring that large volumes of material are available on a consistent basis
  • 15. 15 What are the “waste bans” cont… Who do they apply to? 310 CMR 19.017(3)(a): “No person shall dispose, transfer for disposal, or contract for disposal of the restricted material…”  Permitted Facilities  Haulers  Generators
  • 16. MassDEP Waste Ban Compliance Strategy  Increased inspections and enforcement  101 enforcement actions through January 2014  More than 50 in February and March 2014  Using facility and third party data  Now in place at municipal waste combustors  Will expand to landfills and transfer stations  Lowering action levels – more facility data  Outreach and targeting inspections  RecyclingWorks resources and assistance 16
  • 17. 17 Banned Material Categories *  Zero Tolerance Items  Lead Acid Batteries  Cathode Ray Tubes  White Goods (large appliances)  Materials with Action Levels  Recyclable Paper  Glass, Metal, Plastic Containers  Leaf and Yard Waste  Asphalt Pavement, Brick, Concrete, Metal and Clean Gypsum Wallboard * Tires and Wood can be accepted at the discretion of MWC facilities
  • 18. 18 Banned Materials – Action Level Items - Recyclable Paper (20% or more) – will change to 10% - Glass, Metal, Plastic Containers (20% or more) – will change to 10% - Leaves and Yard Waste (10%) - Construction & Demolition Materials (20%) - Asphalt pavement, brick, concrete, metal, wood, and clean gypsum wallboard
  • 19. Cardboard
  • 20. Paper
  • 21. Bottles and Cans
  • 22. Leaves and Yard Waste
  • 23. Commercial Organics Waste Ban  Will take effect October 1, 2014  Food waste and vegetative material  Does not apply to management in wastewater  Commercial/institutional organics – dispose > 1 ton/week  Estimate – 1,700 businesses/institutions subject to the ban 23
  • 24. Food Waste Generators 24
  • 25. Waste Ban Development  Waste bans monitored/enforced @ solid waste facilities  Would update/modify waste ban guidance for facilities  would require revised facility plan  Propose action level threshold of 10% by volume  Q&A for generators/haulers  Resources on how to comply on RecyclingWorks web site 25
  • 26. Contact Information www.mass.gov/dep/public/committee/swacorg.htm www.mass.gov/dep/recycle/reduce/commorg.htm http://www.mass.gov/dep/cleanenergy.htm http://www.mass.gov/eea/agencies/massdep/service/energy/ anaerobic-digestion/anaerobic-digestion-financing-and- technical-.html www.recyclingworksma.com John Fischer, MassDEP John.fischer@state.ma.us 617-292-5632 26

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